Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 6/17/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Bonnie Morris?

Bonnie J. Morris

Professor of Women's Studies

George Washington University

HQ Phone:  (202) 715-4000

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

George Washington University

900 23rd Street, NW

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20037

United States

Company Description

In the heart of the nation's capital, with additional programs in Virginia, the George Washington University, or GW, was created by an Act of Congress in 1821. Today, GW is the largest institution of higher education in the District of Columbia. The university...more

Background Information

Employment History

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Women's Studies

Georgetown University


Affiliations

Rainbow History Project

Board Member


Kentucky Seminole Club

Board Member


Mothertongue

Board Member


Lubavitcher Women

Women's Studies Professor, Historian and Author


White Rock Church of Christ

Member


Education

Carolina Friends School


Davis High School


B.A.

Jewish history

American University


Ph.D.

women's history

Binghamton University


Ph.D.

women's history

State University of New York at Binghamton


Web References(99 Total References)


Welcome to Military Partners

militarypartners.com [cached]

The program also showcased three women who have reached high positions in DoD and in the civilian sector: Sue Payton, deputy undersecretary of defense for advanced systems and concepts, Office of the Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics; Bonnie Morris, author and professor of womens studies at George Washington University and Georgetown University, Washington; and Debra Knopman, vice president and director of RAND Infrastructure, Safety and Environment, Arlington.


Eifrig Publishing | Bonnie Morris

www.eifrigpublishing.com [cached]

Bonnie Morris
BONNIE J. MORRIS, Ph.D., is a women's history professor on the faculty of both Georgetown University and George Washington University. She has contributed essays, poems and stories to over fift y anthologies of women's writing. BIG AND STRONG is her eighth book. Books by Bonnie Morris


Eifrig Publishing | Authors

www.eifrigpublishing.com [cached]

Bonnie Morris
BONNIE J. MORRIS, Ph.D., is a women's history professor on the faculty of both Georgetown University and George Washington University. She has contributed essays, poems and stories to over fift y anthologies of women's writing. BIG AND STRONG is her eighth book.... Full Bio


College Quarterly - Review - Revenge of the Women's Studies Professor

collegequarterly.ca [cached]

Bonnie J. Morris
In Revenge of the Women's Studies Professor, Bonnie J. Morris challenges most of these perceptions. Morris is a Women's Studies professor at George Washington University in the District of Columbia. She is, by accident of birth, part of the Third Wave. It is not her fault that she wasn't born a century ago when she could have been a Suffragette. It is not even her fault that she's too young to have contributed an article to the inaugural issue of Ms. magazine. She is what she is, and she is when she is-and she is determined to make the best of it as a Women's Studies teacher in the first decade of the 21st century. She also knows that criticism from her seniors in the women's movement is by no means the biggest problem. Just as in past battles to win the vote or to be able to sign legal contracts as persons in their own right, it is patriarchy that is the fundamental obstacle. Bonnie Morris is well aware of the legacy of previous phases of feminism, and she is not about to betray her heritage. Instead, she intends to build on it. Instead of looking for a few female examples to flesh out man's story, Morris directly confronts the backlash against feminism that is so visible in contemporary culture by defending Women's Studies in the curriculum not as an adjunct or a frill, but as both an intellectual and a political necessity. She does so in book that is an update of her 1993 one-woman play (with the same title). A performance artist in addition to being a writer and an educator, she contradicts critics of Women's Studies both in style and in substance. Revenge of the Women's Studies Professor is divided into ten chapters that document chronologically Bonnie Morris's personal journey. Each is based on the ten scenes from her play, which begins in her youth and continues through the experience of being among the first students of Third Wave feminists in the early days of formal Women's Studies programs and on to her life as an adult and an academic. She remembers the way in which her emerging field was ridiculed by traditional scholars who, of course, were the same type of historians and social scientists that mocked social history, trade union history, Black history and other forms of "history from the bottom up. She also offers advice on how to deal with those critics, who may be a little quieter now, but whose basic attitudes have not changed very much. Dr. Morris's advice is offered cheerfully; and that advice is, in essence, to stay cheerful! It is also to make sure that the critics who scoff at Women's Studies as an ideological dead-end and a retreat for second-rate scholars who are interested only in a culture of complaint and only want to talk (or gossip) with one another while disregarding the challenges of real research, writing and teaching. Women's Studies, she insists, is not a forum for male-bashing. It is not a place where malcontents can gather and get an easy "A" or, for that matter, an easy degree in an undisciplined discipline. Dr. Morris, it turns out, is committed to academic rigor, and she has two qualities that are not expected in the dominant stereotype of Women's Studies professors. First, she is an astute academic politician. She understands that Women's Studies is generally considered as second-rate. It is often stuck in "interdisciplinary" studies with few, if any, tenured faculty of its own. It is even worse in colleges, where whole programs are rare and Women's Studies is most often isolated electives in an undifferentiated roster of "general education" subjects that are mainly taught by English teachers, psychologists or sociologists who have other commitments. She is realistic. She raises and no great but improbable expectations. Working in the field, she knows, will mean years (or decades) of fighting just to make ends meet (personally and professionally). Women's Studies is not a place for sissies! Yet, through it all, she steadfastly remains in good spirits. Professional diligence and personal restraint (especially when goaded by the misogynistic and unrepentant males) is, she is convinced, necessary for survival. Second, she is eminently practical. Eager to bring Women's Studies into the mainstream of education and of society, Dr. Morris not only offers helpful hints about how to cope with insults, anger and maybe jealousy, but she also explains why Women's Studies not only merits a legitimate place in education, but in the so-called real world as well. These are times in which students appear to be motivated more by the vocational relevance of their studies than by intellectual curiosity or the drive for social justice. "Will this course help me get a job," they ask; Dr. Morris tells them that Women's Studies definitely will.


loolwa.com

Bonnie J. Morris
Professor of Women's Studies George Washington University


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory