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This profile was last updated on 3/20/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Executive Director, President, Co...

Phone: (212) ***-****  HQ Phone
Local Address: New York City, New York, United States
Theater Resources Unlimited
C/O The Players Theater Office Suite 115 Macdougal Street
New York, New York 10012
United States

Company Description: Over the years, TRU has developed a structured range of programs to address the needs of its members. TRU served as the umbrella organization for a co-production by...   more
Background

Employment History

125 Total References
Web References
Theater Resources Unlimited - TRU Officers
www.truonline.org, 20 Mar 2014 [cached]
Bob Ost , Executive Director, President, CEO, Co-founder
TRU Love Benefit 2001
www.truonline.org, 20 Mar 2014 [cached]
TRU President Bob Ost giving the TRU Volunteer of the Year Award to our Director of Special Events Courtney Sweeting.
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President Bob Ost presenting the 2001 TRU "Spirit of Theater" Award
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The Broadway Voices Choir sing Bob Ost's
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The cast and crew of the 1999 First Annual TRU LOVE Benefit . Back row (left to right): David Sabella, Paul Johnson (music director), Peter Kapetan, Steven Sandburg (music director), David Maiocco (music director), director Doug DeVita, Christiane Noll, Barry Ford . 3rd row: Heather MacRae, Mary Barto, Suzanna Bowling, Dottie Burman, Vickie Phillips, Vicki Shaghoian, Marcia Iris Feldman , TRU's Bob Ost.
The TRU Article
www.truonline.org, 20 Mar 2014 [cached]
At one point, moderator Bob Ost broached the current concern about getting young people to attend the theater in greater numbers.
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Bob Ost quipped, "that's your star."
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BOB OST, Founder and Executive Director of TRU, assembled and moderated a rich panel of industry people, including ERIC GOLDMAN (Entertainment Attorney/Producer), JAMIBETH MARGOLIS (Independent Casting Director/Stage Director) JOE CALARCO (Co-Artistic Director Breaking Bread Theatre) FRANK & ELIZA VENTURA (CAP21 Theatre and Conservatory), JOHN CHATTERTON (Executive Director, Midtown International Theatre Festival and Off-Off Broadway Review creator) and TIFFANI GAVIN (Producer and General Manager).
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Toward the end of the evening moderator Bob Ost brought up the conversation we didn't have, "What are the markets for new works that aren't commercially viable?
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Bob Ost, executive director of TRU, moderated.
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Ost explained the rationale behind these laws: "The government does not want you [as a donor] to strengthen the product with an eye towards profiting from it."
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As a psychological tip, Ost advised that "The key to effective asking is asking with the full understanding that people have the right to say no."
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Ost summed up by saying, "This is not a time to be shy about asking; it's a time to be honest, open and empathetic."
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As TRU executive director Bob Ost noted, commercial/not-for-profit partnerships sometimes hit the shoals when commercial producers' concerns over marketability clash with not-for-profits' worries over the sullying effect enhancement dollars might have on their creative mission.
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Ost started the discussion by pointing out that, when it comes to electronic media, there are "a lot of caveats because of Equity" when it comes to photography or videotaping.
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Ost agreed: "If your content isn't strong, you're better not to send it out ­- you could kill your show.
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Also, Ost pointed out, it's counterproductive for your video to become a nuisance to the people you're trying to reach.
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Ost did voice skepticism over the idea that electronic media is a magical, cheap solution to the expense of traditional marketing strategies: "It hasn't been demonstrated conclusively that youtube videos translate into ticket sales. However, Cutter pointed out, "We have no idea if subway ads sell shows," and Ost agreed that "It does all add to your multiple impressions.
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Going back to Frushtick's earlier comment, Ost asked what the uses are for video, other than ticket sales.
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Ost particularly recommended that you "think ahead in terms of segmenting, if you're putting together a mailing list;" you may not want to mail everything to every person on your list, so it's important to decide early on what categories you want to divide them into.
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Bob Ost moderated.
Ost opened the panel by getting straight to the point: "Is internet marketing replacing all other kinds of marketing?"
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"It's also a repeat impression," Ost pointed out, "in addition to the e-blasts, etcetera."
But it is still vitally important to have an online presence. As Ost pointed out, though: "It's great to have a website, but how do you get people there?
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But Ost cautioned the audience not to make the opposite mistake by forgetting to brand the theater company at the same time as the show. He also pointed out that part of the way you reinforce the company's brand is to remember its mission when you're choosing shows.
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Overton and Glaub both sang the praises of behavioral targeting; Ost, meanwhile, seemed to have certain reservations about it, saying, "I understand it, I think it's great, and I think it's creepy.
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Regarding your mailing list, Ost told the audience that "You should be aspiring to at least a thousand names," and he advised new companies to think ahead in terms of list segmentation. ("List segmentation" is the process of dividing your list into certain categories, so that you can keep track of how people came to you and/or so that you can easily target your mailings to specific parts of the list, instead of mailing to the whole group at once.)
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Ost and Overton summed up by reminding the audience that, no matter what technological changes may have occurred or still be in store, effective advertising will remain a matter of putting an alluring message in the right context.
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As Ost put it, "Marketing is going to always come down to positioning.
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"Getting booked in the college circuit is not as slam-dunk as people think it is," Ost pointed out.
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The theatrical venue you get is determined by lottery. (If you're thinking of going further afield, Ost pointed out that "in Edinburgh you don't get accepted into the Fringe until you have actually booked a venue, which you have to negotiate.")
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According to Bob Ost, "You have to be able find the money or have the money; you have to put together a creative team; you have to be good at managing relationships.
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Ost agreed, saying that a lot of in-fighting in productions is due to insecurities translated from the producer to the company.
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These questions and more were covered by the panel, moderated by TRU president Bob Ost, and featuring Paul Bargetto, Managing Director of Public Affairs of the League of Independent Theater; Frances Black, Director of Member Services A.R.T.-New York; Martin Denton, Editor of nytheatre.com and nytheatrecast.com; Virginia Louloudes, executive director of A.R.T.-New York; and Stacey Cooper McMath, Associate Arts Program Specialist at the Department of Cultural Affairs.
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Ost phrased it this way: "It's negative because it brings to mind Broadway, a competitive market.
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Ost continued that train of thought, asking "Can something be indie if it's under Equity?," since Equity does, after all, impose restrictions.
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As a way to begin answering that question, Ost said that "I think 'indie' is useful if we attach an aesthetic to it."
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Ost agreed about the importance of off-off-Broadway, reminding us that last year there were "1100 off-off-Broadway shows, as opposed to maybe sixty Broadway and a hundred Off-Broadway.
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Towards the end of the panel, Ost indicated that he himself was somewhat surprised at the direction the discussion had taken, saying, "It's interesting that the conversation gets so entangled around Equity."
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Ost said that TRU itself, as a 501c3, is able to get hugely helpful funding from NYSCA and DCA, and Bargetto pointed out that many indie companies are umbrellaed by 501c3's.
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Ost started with the basics: how do the panelists decide what to produce, or who to represent?
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Ost asked Wreghitt what he liked about Impressionism; "I'm a sucker for romance," he said.
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Ost asked for times when the panelists had fallen in love with a play, but had decided not to produce or represent it.
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Ost asked, "Why is it so hard to read a play?
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Ost said, "I'm suspicious of a play that has fifteen locations;" it makes him think that perhaps what the writer really wants to create is a screenplay. And there might be other technical things that writers can do to improve their craft. "I do believe in dramaturgy," Ost said.
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In the case of our panelists, not very, although, as Ost pointed out, lots of producers and agents would feel differently.
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Ost added: "Sometimes people may not be interested in your play, but they can be interested in you.
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Resources to Make Your Producing Life Easier," TRU's Bob Ost and BackStage's Sherry Eaker spoke to representatives from several companies who are working to make New York theater financially viable: Martin Denton, Executive Director of New York Theatre Experience; Lee Eagle, Senior Account Executive, and Victoria Gettler, Acount Executive, of Theatremania and Ovationtix; Ahmed Tigani, Direct Donations Coordinator of Materials for the Arts, Jon Reuning, co-founder of United Stages; Emily Watts, Director of Liability Insurance of Fractured Atlas; and Hal Hochhauser of Shakespeare Mailing Services.
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However, Ost cautioned, "Anything less than 10% off is not perceived as a meaningful discount.
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Ost agreed, pointing out that printed post cards remain visible for days, unlike just another one of the day's 150 emails.
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Ost introduced Jon Reuning, the last panelist, by saying "United Stages has been an incredibly good friend to TRU for years.
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And Reuning made the same sorts of observations as Ost about the value of paper marketing: "a lot of hands touch the programs, people tend to read them a second time, they tend to save them."
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"In many ways, the cabaret venue can allow producers to get a show up and running less expensively than a theater venue can and hopefully lead them to the possibility of expanding their audience later," Ost explained, setting the framework for the panelists to recount their exper
Editor: Bob ...
www.truonline.org, 20 Mar 2014 [cached]
Editor: Bob Ost
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• TRU's Bob Ost will help you clarify your goals, create your strategies, strengthen your pitch and execute your marketing materials.
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And we are proud that TRU member Daryl Sledge is the producer of this off-broadway hit! ~Bob Ost
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This wonderful play not only made me see Durang in a new light, it actually heightened my appreciation of the genuine humanity of Chekhov. ~Bob Ost
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You'll have a great time. ~Bob Ost
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Bob Ost of Theater Resources Unlimited is a client of mine and I was able to save his company money on their payroll and tax filing.
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TRU's Bob Ost and partner Gary Hughes will help you clarify your goals, create your strategies, strengthen your pitch and execute your marketing materials.
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Bob dis-plays the Palace ... Catherine the Great's Winter Palace, that is, in St. Petersburg.
TRU 2009 Panels & Events
www.truonline.org, 20 Mar 2014 [cached]
Above, left to right: Tom Polum, producer (The Toxic Avenger); Randy Adams, Junkyard Dog Productions (Vanities, Memphis);Ken Waissman, producer (original Broadway productions of Grease, Over Here!, Agnes of God, Torch Song Trilogy and the upcoming musical, Josephine); TRU's Bob Ost.
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Left to right, above: Shirley Faison, executive director, National Black Theatre; Tom Smedes, producer (Ace the Musical, [title of show], Naked Boys Singing, Dog Sees God), general manager (Altar Boyz, Musical of Musicals), company manager (Show Boat);Tiffani Gavin, Sr. Director of Licensing for Theatrical Rights Worldwide, former executive producer at Clear Channel Entertainment, former company manager (Blue Man Group); Sheila Speller, producer/general manager (Another Man's Poison); Jamillah Lamb, producer (Platanos and Collard Greens); TRU president Bob Ost
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Co-moderated bySherry Eaker, editor-at-large of Back Stage.Panel (at left, from left to right): TRU's Bob Ost; Emily Watts, Director of Liability Insurance of Fractured Atlas; Martin Denton, Executive Director, The New York Theatre Experience, Inc.; Ahmed Tigani, Direct Donations Coordinator of Materials for the Arts; Victoria Gettlerand Lee Eagle from Theatermania and OvationTix; Jonathan Reuning, co-founder of United Stages; Hal Hochhauser of Shakespeare Mailing Services.
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Featuring (above, left to right): Ken Davenport, producer (Altar Boyz, My First Time, Speed-the-Plow, Blithe Spirit); Hugh Hysell of HHC Marketing (Impressionism, Jersey Boys, 39 Steps, Irena's Vow, Rooms; plus BroadwayBox.com, LunchTix.com, TicketsThisWeek.com, BroadwayInsider.com and TheMenEvent.com); Thomas Adkins, Associate Director of Ticketing for the Theatre Development Fund (TDF); and Bob.
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