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Wrong Blair Jobe?

Blair A. Jobe

Professor of Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery

University of Pittsburgh

HQ Phone:  (412) 647-5800

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Pittsburgh

3459 Fifth Avenue

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,15213

United States

Company Description

We are a theoretical & computational chemistry group at the University of Pittsburgh. We develop and apply electronic structure approaches to help guide discoveries in catalysis, spectroscopy, and materials chemistry. Our research areas include: (1) Developi...more

Background Information

Employment History

Physician Chair

Allegheny Health Network


Director of Esophageal Research and Esophageal Diagnostics and Therapeutic Endoscopy

UPMC


Clinical Investigator

BARRX Medical , Inc.


Affiliations

NinePoint Medical , Inc.

Clinical Advisory Board Member


EndoStim Inc

Scientific Advisor


Barrett

Founder


Barrett’s Esophagus Risk Consortium

Founder


Education

Bachelor of Science degree

Loyola Marymount University


M.D.

McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine


M.D.

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine


bachelor’s degree

Loyola Marymount University


medical degree

Creighton University


Web References(94 Total References)


Acid Reflux Treatment Problem? The Warning On the Pill's Label Says Use for 14 Days - RefluxMD -

www.refluxmd.com [cached]

According to a study by Dr. Blair Jobe at the University of Pittsburg, PPI-treated GERD patients, who have mild or absent symptoms while on the medication, were 60 percent more likely to have Barrett's esophagus, a precancerous condition, than those with more severe symptoms while on the medication. [2] Disappointedly, a good response to the medication does not eliminate the risk of cancer.


The four things your doctor will never tell you about reflux disease

www.refluxmd.com [cached]

According to a study by Dr. Blair Jobe at the University of Pittsburg, PPI-treated GERD patients, who have mild or absent symptoms while on the medication, were 60 percent more likely to have Barrett's esophagus, a precancerous condition, than those with more severe symptoms while on the medication.


Medical First: Targeted Therapy Prevents Esophageal Cancer in Local Study

www.guidetogoodhealth.com [cached]

Led by Blair Jobe, MD, one of the nation's foremost esophageal disease experts and Director of the Institute for the Treatment of Esophageal and Thoracic Disease at the West Penn Allegheny Health System (WPAHS), the groundbreaking pre-clinical study is the first to demonstrate the potential of a targeted drug therapy for preventing esophageal cancer in a high risk population.
Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when the amount of gastric fluid (acid and bile from the stomach) that refluxes into the esophagus (the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach) exceeds the normal limit, causing a variety of possible symptoms, such as heartburn, chest pain and pulmonary distress. It is estimated that 25-40% of healthy adult Americans experience symptomatic GERD on a monthly basis and approximately 10-20% suffer from it daily. In some cases, chronic GERD causes mucosal injury to the inner lining tissues of the esophagus, which can lead to a premalignant condition called Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's is a potentially serious complication in which the squamous cells that normally line the esophagus are replaced by gland cells that resemble those found in the linings of the stomach and small intestine which are more resistant to the harsh gastric fluids. "The abnormal presence and proliferation of these gland cells in the esophagus substantially increases the risk of developing an invasive cancer called adenocarcinoma, so our current strategy is to perform surveillance endoscopy, treat more advanced Barrett's with ablation procedures or remove diseased tissue with an endoscopic procedure," Dr. Jobe said. "What we have shown in this study is that there may ultimately be a better way to prevent esophageal cancer using a targeted medical therapy that simply disables the molecular switch that puts the process of developing this condition into motion," he said. Dr. Jobe and his team focused their investigation on a molecular pathway - called the hedgehog pathway - that is associated with the growth of epithelial tissues in the stomach and upper digestive tract during development of the foregut. It is believed that Barrett's is an aberrant expression and activation of this pathway that takes place in the esophagus in response to excessive exposure to gastric juices. To disrupt the hedgehog pathway, the team used an investigational drug developed by Bristol Meyers Squibb that inhibits a protein central to the pathway's function - called smoothened (Smo). After surgically inducing GERD in a large sampling of rats, the Smo inhibitor drug was administered orally to half of them over a period of 28 weeks. Among subjects randomized to receive the drug, there was a 36% lower risk of Barrett's esophagus and a 62% relative risk reduction for developing esophageal cancer compared to the control group. "Overexpression of Smo with resultant activation of the hedgehog pathway has been identified previously as a factor in several cancer types, including esophageal cancer. In our study, there was a highly significant risk reduction in the development of both Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer in animals treated with the Smo inhibitor, indicating that this therapy may have the potential to prevent cancer associated with reflux disease," Dr. Jobe said. "To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma in an in vivo [living organism] model of this cancer type." Dr. Jobe said the next step is to further evaluate the hedgehog pathway in both the preclinical and clinical setting to more definitively prove the preventive effect of Smo inhibition and better understand the precise mechanism of action. Editors Note: This research was conducted by Dr. Jobe while he was on staff at the University of Pittsburgh.


animedream.org

Many end-stage lung disease patients, particularly those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or cystic fibrosis have GERD, and the reflux problem is very common after lung transplantation, said Blair Jobe, M.D., professor of surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pitt School of Medicine.
Also, GERD has been associated with bronchiolotis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is a progressive impairment of air flow that is a leading cause of death after lung transplantation. Its cause is not yet known. "It's possible that reflux, which is due to a weak sphincter between the stomach and esophagus, allows acid and other gastric juices to leak back not only into the esophagus, but also to get aspirated in small amounts into the lungs," Dr. Jobe said. "That micro-aspiration could be setting the stage for the development of BOS." Lead author Toshitaka Hoppo, M.D., Ph.D., research assistant professor, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pitt School of Medicine, stressed the importance of esophageal testing for reflux in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease. He noted that "almost one-half of the patients in our series did not have symptoms but were having clinically silent exposure to gastric fluid. Based on this finding, there should be a very low threshold for esophageal testing in this patient population." For the study, Dr. Jobe's team reviewed medical charts of 43 end-stage lung-disease patients with documented GERD, 19 of whom were being evaluated for lung transplant and 24 who had already undergone transplantation. "The surgery appeared to benefit even those who hadn't yet had a transplant," Dr. Jobe noted.


www.accesssurgery.com

Blair A. Jobe, MD, FACS
Professor of Surgery Division of Thoracic and Foregut Surgery Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery University of Pittsburgh


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