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2014-07-14T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Billy Yeargin?

Billy Yeargin Jr.

U.S. History Teacher

Vance-Granville Community College

HQ Phone: (252) 492-2061

Email: b***@***.edu

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Vance-Granville Community College

200 Community House Road

Henderson, North Carolina 27537

United States

Find other employees at this company (255)

Background Information

Employment History

U.S. History Teacher

Johnston Community College

Executive Director

North Carolina Sweet Potato Commission

Professor

The Mount Airy Museum of Regional History

Legislative Aide for Agriculture

U.S. Senate

Education

Fork Union Military Academy

Oak Ridge Military Academy

Oak Ridge Military Institute

European history and politics

University of Oxford

M.A.

Liberal Studies

Duke University

Web References (15 Total References)


Museum Hosts Lecture On Tobacco And Culture

www.online-cigarettes-shop.com [cached]

With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about cheap cigarettes and American culture.

Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the discount cigarette online industry, was the guest speaker for the October "History Talks" program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobacco's impact on Amerian society over the years.
Though the event was originally scheduled to be held inside the museum, organizers decided to move it outside to the courtyard where many festival-goers sat throughout the weekend to eat and socialize. Some people who visited the courtyard on Sunday were surprised to find that a lecture was taking place there, and they stopped to listen while they ate festival treats.
Yeargin said prior to the event, "I love the festival atmosphere.
...
Yeargin said that up until the French and Indian War, tobacco was used as a currency in North America. He said many of the founding fathers were tobacco farmers.
"Tobacco was the backbone, not just of the economy, but of culture and society," he remarked.
Yeargin also talked about different types of tobacco and techniques that were developed over the years. He then spoke about the tobacco industry in Surry County and what it still means today. According to Yeargin, there were 21 plants for tobacco production in Surry County in 1893, and that grew to 45 in 1927, which employed 2,875 people here.
"Tobacco ruled the roost in the county," he said. Tobacco is still a multi-million dollar industry in the county, he noted, though tobacco culture has declined.
...
Yeargin spoke a little bit about the history of the chant and gave a short demonstration.
...
According to information provided by the museum, Yeargin teaches U.S. history at Johnston Community College and Vance-Granville Community College and teaches Southern culture for Osher Lifelong Learning program at Duke University. He was former executive director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, was a spokesman for the U.S. Tobacco Growers, was agriculture liaison to former N.C. Governor James Hunt Jr., and created and directed the World Tobacco Auctioneers Championship for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He has also been executive director of the N.C. Sweet Potato Commission. He graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy, holds an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Duke University and has studied European history and politics at the University of Oxford. He has published two books on N.C. tobacco culture: North Carolina Tobacco, a History and Remembering North Carolina Tobacco.
...
With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about cheap cigarettes and American culture.Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the discount cigarette online industry, was the guest speaker for the October "History Talks" program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobacco's impact on Amerian society over the years.


www.online-cigarettes-shop.com - tobacco-news

www.online-cigarettes-shop.com [cached]

With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about cheap cigarettes and American culture.Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the discount cigarette online industry, was the guest speaker for the October History Talks program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobaccos impact on Amerian society over the years. hough the event was originally scheduled to be held inside the museum, organizers decided to move it outside to the courtyard where many festival-goers sat throughout the weekend to eat and socialize. Some people who visited the courtyard on Sunday were surprised to find that a lecture was taking place there, and they stopped to listen while they ate festival treats. Yeargin said prior to the event, I love the festival atmosphere.

...
Yeargin said that up until the French and Indian War, tobacco was used as a currency in North America. He said many of the founding fathers were tobacco farmers.Tobacco was the backbone, not just of the economy, but of culture and society, he remarked.Yeargin also talked about different types of tobacco and techniques that were developed over the years. He then spoke about the tobacco industry in Surry County and what it still means today. According to Yeargin, there were 21 plants for tobacco production in Surry County in 1893, and that grew to 45 in 1927, which employed 2,875 people here.Tobacco ruled the roost in the county, he said. Tobacco is still a multi-million dollar industry in the county, he noted, though tobacco culture has declined.
...
Yeargin spoke a little bit about the history of the chant and gave a short demonstration.
...
ccording to information provided by the museum, Yeargin teaches U.S. history at Johnston Community College and Vance-Granville Community College and teaches Southern culture for Osher Lifelong Learning program at Duke University. He was former executive director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, was a spokesman for the U.S. Tobacco Growers, was agriculture liaison to former N.C. Governor James Hunt Jr., and created and directed the World Tobacco Auctioneers Championship for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He has also been executive director of the N.C. Sweet Potato Commission. He graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy, holds an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Duke University and has studied European history and politics at the University of Oxford. He has published two books on N.C. tobacco culture: North Carolina Tobacco, a History and Remembering North Carolina Tobacco. he History Talks program is a series of history lectures at the museum that take place each third Sunday. The project is made possible in part by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit and affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. http://www.online-cigarettes-shop.com/tobacco-news/museum_hosts_lecture_on_tobacco_and_culture.html


Meghann Evans/The NewsProfessor ...

www.mtairynews.com [cached]

Meghann Evans/The NewsProfessor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.

...
Professor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.
slideshow Meghann Evans/The NewsMatt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Matt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Meghann Evans/The NewsBilly Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
...
Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
slideshow
With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about tobacco and American culture.
Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the tobacco industry, was the guest speaker for the October "History Talks" program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobacco's impact on Amerian society over the years.
Though the event was originally scheduled to be held inside the museum, organizers decided to move it outside to the courtyard where many festival-goers sat throughout the weekend to eat and socialize. Some people who visited the courtyard on Sunday were surprised to find that a lecture was taking place there, and they stopped to listen while they ate festival treats. Others came specifically to hear the presentation.
Yeargin said prior to the event, "I love the festival atmosphere.
...
Yeargin said that up until the French and Indian War, tobacco was used as a currency in North America. He said many of the founding fathers were tobacco farmers.
"Tobacco was the backbone, not just of the economy, but of culture and society," he remarked.
Yeargin also talked about different types of tobacco and techniques that were developed over the years. He then spoke about the tobacco industry in Surry County and what it still means today. According to Yeargin, there were 21 plants for tobacco production in Surry County in 1893, and that grew to 45 in 1927, which employed 2,875 people here.
"Tobacco ruled the roost in the county," he said. Tobacco is still a multi-million dollar industry in the county, he noted, though tobacco culture has declined.
...
Yeargin spoke a little bit about the history of the chant and gave a short demonstration.
...
According to information provided by the museum, Yeargin teaches U.S. history at Johnston Community College and Vance-Granville Community College and teaches Southern culture for Osher Lifelong Learning program at Duke University. He was former executive director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, was a spokesman for the U.S. Tobacco Growers, was agriculture liaison to former N.C. Governor James Hunt Jr., and created and directed the World Tobacco Auctioneers Championship for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He has also been executive director of the N.C. Sweet Potato Commission. He graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy, holds an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Duke University and has studied European history and politics at the University of Oxford. He has published two books on N.C. tobacco culture: North Carolina Tobacco, a History and Remembering North Carolina Tobacco.


Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco ...

www.mtairynews.com [cached]

Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History. Mount Airy News - Museum hosts lecture on tobacco and culture

...
Meghann Evans/The NewsProfessor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.
...
Professor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.
slideshow Meghann Evans/The NewsMatt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Matt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Meghann Evans/The NewsBilly Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
...
Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
slideshow
With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about tobacco and American culture.
Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the tobacco industry, was the guest speaker for the October "History Talks" program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobacco's impact on Amerian society over the years.
Though the event was originally scheduled to be held inside the museum, organizers decided to move it outside to the courtyard where many festival-goers sat throughout the weekend to eat and socialize. Some people who visited the courtyard on Sunday were surprised to find that a lecture was taking place there, and they stopped to listen while they ate festival treats. Others came specifically to hear the presentation.
Yeargin said prior to the event, "I love the festival atmosphere.
...
Yeargin said that up until the French and Indian War, tobacco was used as a currency in North America. He said many of the founding fathers were tobacco farmers.
"Tobacco was the backbone, not just of the economy, but of culture and society," he remarked.
Yeargin also talked about different types of tobacco and techniques that were developed over the years. He then spoke about the tobacco industry in Surry County and what it still means today. According to Yeargin, there were 21 plants for tobacco production in Surry County in 1893, and that grew to 45 in 1927, which employed 2,875 people here.
"Tobacco ruled the roost in the county," he said. Tobacco is still a multi-million dollar industry in the county, he noted, though tobacco culture has declined.
...
Yeargin spoke a little bit about the history of the chant and gave a short demonstration.
...
According to information provided by the museum, Yeargin teaches U.S. history at Johnston Community College and Vance-Granville Community College and teaches Southern culture for Osher Lifelong Learning program at Duke University. He was former executive director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, was a spokesman for the U.S. Tobacco Growers, was agriculture liaison to former N.C. Governor James Hunt Jr., and created and directed the World Tobacco Auctioneers Championship for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He has also been executive director of the N.C. Sweet Potato Commission. He graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy, holds an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Duke University and has studied European history and politics at the University of Oxford. He has published two books on N.C. tobacco culture: North Carolina Tobacco, a History and Remembering North Carolina Tobacco.


Meghann Evans/The NewsProfessor ...

www.mtairynews.com [cached]

Meghann Evans/The NewsProfessor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.

...
Professor Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco culture at a lecture at the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History.
slideshow Meghann Evans/The NewsMatt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Matt Edwards, executive director of the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History, introduces Billy Yeargin, who delivered a lecture on tobacco culture on Sunday.
...
Meghann Evans/The NewsBilly Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
...
Billy Yeargin speaks about tobacco and culture in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard on Sunday.
slideshow
With the Autumn Leaves Festival as a backdrop, history buffs and festival attendees gathered in the Mount Airy Museum of Regional History courtyard Sunday afternoon to hear Billy Yeargin deliver a lecture about tobacco and American culture.
Yeargin, a professor with extensive knowledge of the history of the tobacco industry, was the guest speaker for the October "History Talks" program at the museum. He spoke at 2 p.m. on Sunday about tobacco's impact on Amerian society over the years.
Though the event was originally scheduled to be held inside the museum, organizers decided to move it outside to the courtyard where many festival-goers sat throughout the weekend to eat and socialize. Some people who visited the courtyard on Sunday were surprised to find that a lecture was taking place there, and they stopped to listen while they ate festival treats. Others came specifically to hear the presentation.
Yeargin said prior to the event, "I love the festival atmosphere.
...
Yeargin said that up until the French and Indian War, tobacco was used as a currency in North America. He said many of the founding fathers were tobacco farmers.
"Tobacco was the backbone, not just of the economy, but of culture and society," he remarked.
Yeargin also talked about different types of tobacco and techniques that were developed over the years. He then spoke about the tobacco industry in Surry County and what it still means today. According to Yeargin, there were 21 plants for tobacco production in Surry County in 1893, and that grew to 45 in 1927, which employed 2,875 people here.
"Tobacco ruled the roost in the county," he said. Tobacco is still a multi-million dollar industry in the county, he noted, though tobacco culture has declined.
...
Yeargin spoke a little bit about the history of the chant and gave a short demonstration.
...
According to information provided by the museum, Yeargin teaches U.S. history at Johnston Community College and Vance-Granville Community College and teaches Southern culture for Osher Lifelong Learning program at Duke University. He was former executive director of the Tobacco Growers Information Committee, was a spokesman for the U.S. Tobacco Growers, was agriculture liaison to former N.C. Governor James Hunt Jr., and created and directed the World Tobacco Auctioneers Championship for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. He has also been executive director of the N.C. Sweet Potato Commission. He graduated from Oak Ridge Military Academy, holds an M.A. in Liberal Studies from Duke University and has studied European history and politics at the University of Oxford. He has published two books on N.C. tobacco culture: North Carolina Tobacco, a History and Remembering North Carolina Tobacco.

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