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This profile was last updated on 1/25/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

William G. Seaton

Wrong William G. Seaton?

President and Chief Executive Off...

EmplawyerNet
2331 Westwood Boulevard #331
Los Angeles, California 90064
United States

Company Description: EmplawyerNet offers block pricing to law schools wishing to provide their students with EmplawyerNet services. In addition, our EmplawyerNet for Law Schools service...   more
Background

Employment History

Education

  • Law Degrees
    UCLA
  • Bachelors
    UCLA
9 Total References
Web References
Welcome to Ziskind Greene & Shea: Our Bios
www.ziskindgreene.com, 25 Jan 2014 [cached]
Gregg co-founded Emplawyernet in 1991 with fellow legal recruiter Bill Seaton, who continues as its CEO.
VitalCareers.com : About Us
www.vitalcareers.com, 10 Feb 2001 [cached]
William Seaton, Vice President & Publisher
William Seaton, Vice President & Publisher, is a respected innovator in the field of internet-based recruiting.The impetus behind and current Vice President & Publisher of Emplawyernet.com, the largest legal career website, Seaton recognized the potential for a similar service in the healthcare industry.With more than 20 years experience in legal recruitment Seaton is well versed in the unique demands of the industry.He received his Bachelors and Law Degrees from UCLA.
EmplawyerNet's Bill ...
au.vault.com [cached]
EmplawyerNet's Bill Seaton lends a helping hand. ... read more
Womble Carlyle - The National Jurist: Best Law Firms
www.womblecarlyle.com, 28 June 2001 [cached]
Bill Seaton, founder of EmplawyerNet, an Internet-based legal career Web site, doesn't think there is such a thing as a best law firm.
"I don't think there is a best firm, objectively," he said."There isn't any way to properly compare firms against one another.It really is a matter of what is the best firm for the individual involved."
That's what some associates who have made the choice already say.Many decided where to work by looking at more than figures in National Association of Law Placement guides or adding up the bonuses.In each case, they weighed those and other factors-and ended up choosing the firms where they thought they would be happiest.
...
But Seaton pointed out that when law students are selecting a firm fresh out of law school, they might not even be there long enough for partnership chances to matter.
"NALP has found out that the average lawyer is going to have three jobs in their first seven years," he said."Because there is quite a bit of movement, focusing on partnership chances in your first job is not the right approach.It's not the case that very many people are going to join a firm, become partner and retire from there.That's very rare these days."
It's my life
...
Some turnover is unavoidable, Seaton said.
"I don't think you are going to find a law firm that doesn't have a significant amount of turnover, but while 20 to 25 percent a year is common, anything over that should make you wonder," he said.
Seaton advised students to find out as much as they can about associate satisfaction and retention levels.Look at the statistics not just for the last year or two, but five or 10 years, and compare firms in the same city or practice area.If one firm shows spikes when the other firms are stable, it might be better to steer clear.Those associates probably left for a reason, he said.
Clocking in
Another criterion that can help students assess how happy they might be at a given firm is the amount of time they will be expected-or required-to work each week.
...
Seaton warned not to get lulled into a false sense of security if a firm's required hours seem low.
"They are all sweatshops," he said."All firms work very, very hard and all associates at those firms are expected to work extraordinarily hard."
...
It's no secret that with the exception of clinical programs, the typical law school does little to prepare students to actually practice law, Seaton said.That means it's important to consider how much time and money a firm is willing to invest in on-the-job training of new associates, he said.
"In your first few years of work the most important thing to you is to gain advanced training," he said."My questions would focus on what the training program is, and is there a formal training program.If there is not a training program, in my mind that would raise a red flag."
Seaton said students should look for a firm that will help them build a solid foundation in the law that they can use to their advantage.
"That buys you the ability to sell that expertise wherever you want to go," he said."You may work very long hours to get that, but it's the only way to get the freedom and that takes some sacrifice.Just make sure when you are working hard, you are building something for yourself."
Bill Seaton, founder of ...
www.nationaljurist.com, 10 July 2001 [cached]
Bill Seaton, founder of EmplawyerNet, an Internet-based legal career Web site, doesn't think there is such a thing as a best law firm.
"I don't think there is a best firm, objectively," he said.
...
But Seaton pointed out that when law students are selecting a firm fresh out of law school, they might not even be there long enough for partnership chances to matter.
"NALP has found out that the average lawyer is going to have three jobs in their first seven years," he said.
...
Some turnover is unavoidable, Seaton said.
don't think you are going to find a law firm that doesn't have a significant amount of turnover, but while 20 to 25 percent a year is common, anything over that should make you wonder," he said.
...
It's no secret that with the exception of clinical programs, the typical law school does little to prepare students to actually practice law, Seaton said.That means it's important to consider how much time and money a firm is willing to invest in on-the-job training of new associates, he said.
"In your first few years of work the most important thing to you is to gain advanced training," he said."My questions would focus on what the training program is, and is there a formal training program.If there is not a training program, in my mind that would raise a red flag."
Seaton said students should look for a firm that will help them build a solid foundation in the law that they can use to their advantage.
"That buys you the ability to sell that expertise wherever you want to go," he said.
...
After weighing all these factors, and deciding which are most important to them, there is still another step students should take, said Seaton - they should ask around about the firm.
"Ask your professors, career services department, attorney in the practice area or city," he said."Just find out what people think of the firms you are interested in."
But he warned that students need to be prepared to recognize bias.
"Be objective enough to realize that somebody is going to say something negative about every firm," he said.
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