Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

Last Update

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong William Pretzer?

William S. Pretzer

Supervisory Museum Curator

the Smithsonian Institution

HQ Phone:  (202) 357-2700

Direct Phone: (202) ***-****direct phone

Email: p***@***.edu

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

the Smithsonian Institution

1000 JEFFERSON DR SW

Washington, D.C., District of Columbia,20560

United States

Company Description

Since its founding in 1846, the Smithsonian Institution has been committed to inspiring generations through knowledge and discovery. The Smithsonian is the world's largest museum and research complex, consisting of 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoolog... more.

Find other employees at this company (5,105)

Background Information

Employment History

Senior Curator for History

the Smithsonian Institution


Curator of Political History

Ford


Museum Director

Central Michigan University


Curator and Educator

Henry Ford Museum


Affiliations

Lawrence W. Levine Award for the Best Book

Member of the Selection Committee


Michigan Museums Association

Board Member


Allen Park Public Schools

Board Member


Michigan Council for History Education

Board Member


National Commission for Technology Education

Board Member


National Museum of American History

Historian


Education

BA

Stanford University


Web References(131 Total References)


www.tweentribune.com

"It's a day's wages," explains William Pretzer.
He is the museum's senior history curator. "You're asking someone to pay a day's wages in order to be able to vote." Pretzer says the museum accepted the donation of the receipt from Carr's family in 2012. He said the receipt is a vivid example of the way that voting rights were denied to African Americans. "After the 1870s, particularly in the southern states, there was an effort to restrict any kind of political power for African Americans," Pretzer says. In the immediate post-Civil-War era, voting rights were accorded to African Americans in the south. Thousands registered. Smithsonian curator Bill Pretzer sees similarities. "You have to have a particular kind of ID," he explains. That includes identification offered through the state or federal government, military IDs, a state handgun license, a U.S. citizenship certificate, or a U.S. passport. "The kinds of documentation that's needed for this voter ID costs money," Pretzer says. Pretzer says such artifacts are important because they make real something that is hard to imagine.


www.tweentribune.com

"It's a day's wages," explains William Pretzer.
He is the museum's senior history curator. "You're asking someone to pay a day's wages in order to be able to vote." Pretzer says the museum accepted the donation of the receipt from Carr's family in 2012 as a vivid example of the way that voting rights were denied to African Americans. "After the 1870s, particularly in the southern states, there was an effort to restrict any kind of political power for African Americans," Pretzer says. Smithsonian curator Bill Pretzer sees similarities. "You have to have a particular kind of ID," he explains. That includes identification offered through the state or federal government, military IDs, a state handgun license, a U.S. citizenship certificate, or a U.S. passport. "The kinds of documentation that's needed for this voter ID costs money," Pretzer says. Pretzer says such artifacts are important because they make real something that is hard to imagine.


www.tweentribune.com

"It's a day's wages," explains William Pretzer, the museum's senior history curator.
"You're asking someone to pay a day's wages in order to be able to vote." Pretzer says the museum accepted the donation of the receipt from Carr's family in 2012 as a vivid example of the way that voting rights were denied to African Americans. "After the 1870s, particularly in the southern states, there was an effort to restrict any kind of political power for African Americans," Pretzer says. Smithsonian curator Bill Pretzer sees similarities. "You have to have a particular kind of ID," he explains. That includes identification offered through the state or federal government, military IDs, a state handgun license, a U.S. citizenship certificate, or a U.S. passport. "The kinds of documentation that's needed for this voter ID costs money," Pretzer says. Pretzer says such artifacts are important because they make real something that is hard to imagine.


www.tweentribune.com

William Pretzer was 5 years old when Rosa Parks was arrested.
The full import of the event did not register with Pretzer. After all, he was so young and lived more than 2,000 miles away in Sacramento, California. "Within the African American community, it is seen as an opportunity for progress to be made, for attention and pressure to be brought to bear on the white power structure," says Pretzer. Pretzer studied Parks' story in detail in the early 2000s. That is when he helped Detroit's Henry Ford Museum, where he worked for more than 20 years, acquire the retired bus in which the incident occurred. Explore an analysis of Rosa Parks' arrest records, based on a conversation with Pretzer and information conveyed in Parks' 1992 autobiography Rosa Parks: My Story.


www.tweentribune.com

William Pretzer was 5 years old when Rosa Parks of Montgomery, Alabama, was arrested.
The full import of the event did not register with Pretzer. After all, he was so young and lived more than 2,000 miles away in Sacramento, California. "Within the African American community, it is seen as an opportunity for progress to be made, for attention and pressure to be brought to bear on the white power structure," says Pretzer. Pretzer studied Parks' story in detail in the early 2000s, when he helped Detroit's Henry Ford Museum, where he worked for more than 20 years, acquire the retired GM bus in which the incident occurred. Explore an analysis of Rosa Parks' arrest records, based on a conversation with Pretzer and information conveyed in Parks' 1992 autobiography Rosa Parks: My Story.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory