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Wrong William Gittler?

William F. Gittler

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Chief Executive Officer

Catawissa Lumber & Specialty Co. , Inc.


President

The Wood Component Manufacturers Association


Web References(33 Total References)


newsitem.com

"My goal in the transaction was to preserve as many jobs as possible for my employees, who have been very loyal and dedicated through the years and stuck with me during these hard times," Catawissa Lumber CEO William Gittler Jr. said.
Maski is employing approximately 75 people. Gittler said there were 104 employees at Catawissa Lumber when the company was sold Jan. 29. Gittler said the new owner has kept the pay, benefits and work the same for the remaining employees. Facing bankruptcy Gittler said he regretfully had to give up the business because he was facing foreclosure and bankruptcy. The agreement left Gittler in charge of the remaining debt and other Catawissa Lumber properties, and did not require Catawissa Wood and Components to retain the same employees. Gittler added, "It's important to point out that this was not a sale of the company, but a sale of the operational assets." Gittler, who thanked his employees, stated, "We tried everything we could to survive in an hellacious environment for the past 2 1/2 years." Gittler said a changing market and bad economy hurt the company's revenues, and he was eventually instructed by the bank that held the deed to find a buyer. By 2008, Catawissa Lumber no longer had a line of credit, operating instead on a cash basis. During that time, the company was paying penalty fees in the tens of thousands of dollars to its bank, he said. Between 2008 and 2009, the company's revenue decreased from $18 million to $9 million. Gittler, who did not say how much Maski Hardwood paid to purchase the facility, will not realize any money from the transaction since it will all go to the bank to pay off outstanding debt. He said sale proceeds won't cover what the company owes on three loans. He said he plans to liquidate remaining assets, including the old Catawissa facility and a 35,000-square-foot warehouse.


www.prosalesonline.com

"My goal in the transaction was to preserve as many jobs as possible for my employees, who have been very loyal and dedicated through the years and stuck with me during these hard times," Catawissa Lumber CEO William Gittler Jr. said.
Maski is employing approximately 75 people. Gittler said there were 104 employees at Catawissa Lumber when the company was sold Jan. 29. Gittler said the new owner has kept the pay, benefits and work the same for the remaining employees. Facing bankruptcy Gittler said he regretfully had to give up the business because he was facing foreclosure and bankruptcy. The agreement left Gittler in charge of the remaining debt and other Catawissa Lumber properties, and did not require Catawissa Wood and Components to retain the same employees. Gittler added, "It's important to point out that this was not a sale of the company, but a sale of the operational assets." Gittler, who thanked his employees, stated, "We tried everything we could to survive in an hellacious environment for the past 2 1/2 years." Gittler said a changing market and bad economy hurt the company's revenues, and he was eventually instructed by the bank that held the deed to find a buyer. By 2008, Catawissa Lumber no longer had a line of credit, operating instead on a cash basis. During that time, the company was paying penalty fees in the tens of thousands of dollars to its bank, he said. Between 2008 and 2009, the company's revenue decreased from $18 million to $9 million. Gittler, who did not say how much Maski Hardwood paid to purchase the facility, will not realize any money from the transaction since it will all go to the bank to pay off outstanding debt. He said sale proceeds won't cover what the company owes on three loans. He said he plans to liquidate remaining assets, including the old Catawissa facility and a 35,000-square-foot warehouse.


www.prosalesmagazine.org

"My goal in the transaction was to preserve as many jobs as possible for my employees, who have been very loyal and dedicated through the years and stuck with me during these hard times," Catawissa Lumber CEO William Gittler Jr. said.
Maski is employing approximately 75 people. Gittler said there were 104 employees at Catawissa Lumber when the company was sold Jan. 29. Gittler said the new owner has kept the pay, benefits and work the same for the remaining employees. Facing bankruptcy Gittler said he regretfully had to give up the business because he was facing foreclosure and bankruptcy. The agreement left Gittler in charge of the remaining debt and other Catawissa Lumber properties, and did not require Catawissa Wood and Components to retain the same employees. Gittler added, "It's important to point out that this was not a sale of the company, but a sale of the operational assets." Gittler, who thanked his employees, stated, "We tried everything we could to survive in an hellacious environment for the past 2 1/2 years." Gittler said a changing market and bad economy hurt the company's revenues, and he was eventually instructed by the bank that held the deed to find a buyer. By 2008, Catawissa Lumber no longer had a line of credit, operating instead on a cash basis. During that time, the company was paying penalty fees in the tens of thousands of dollars to its bank, he said. Between 2008 and 2009, the company's revenue decreased from $18 million to $9 million. Gittler, who did not say how much Maski Hardwood paid to purchase the facility, will not realize any money from the transaction since it will all go to the bank to pay off outstanding debt. He said sale proceeds won't cover what the company owes on three loans. He said he plans to liquidate remaining assets, including the old Catawissa facility and a 35,000-square-foot warehouse.


www.wgrc.com

Catawissa Lumber CEO William Gittler Jr. tells the Press Enterprise the new owners have kept the pay, benefits, and work the same for the approximately 75 employees who are left.
Gittler regrets having to give up the company his family started in 1957 near Paxinos in Northumberland County. But he was facing foreclosure and bankruptcy.


www.woodcomponents.org [cached]

Contact: Mr. William Gittler, Jr.


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