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Wrong William DiMichele?

William A. DiMichele

Department of Paleobiology

Smithsonian Institution

Direct Phone: (202) ***-****direct phone

Email: d***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Smithsonian Institution

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Web References(43 Total References)


botany.org

2005 - Dr. William DiMichele, Smithsonian Institution


www.palaeobotany.org [cached]

The programme is now available and includes a great range of speakers with keynote presentations from Martin Gibling (Dalhousie University, Canada) and Bill DiMichele (Smithsonian Institution); full details of speakers and titles are available in the draft programme.


www.westernpaleo.org [cached]

William DiMichele, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian


www.survivor-online.co.uk [cached]

That's when they called paleobotanist Howard Falcon-Lang from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom and William DiMichele, a curator of fossil plants at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.


www.miningconnection.com

William DiMichele studies part of the Springfield coal fossilized forest in southern Illinois. (Photo: Scott D. Elrick/NY Times)
William DiMichele studies part of the Springfield coal fossilized forest in southern Illinois. (Photo: Scott D. Elrick/NY Times) "It's a botanical Pompeii, buried in a geological instant," said William A. DiMichele, a paleobiologist and curator of fossil plants at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington and one of the forest's discoverers. He believes it was gently entombed by floods that successively washed through a swamp. DiMichele and colleagues have explored a 5-mile path, or transect, starting at the ancient riverbank and arrowing through the swamp. Just as if this were a living forest, they have stopped along the route to identify individual leaves or study fallen trunks. Moving away from the river, a dense thicket of seed ferns gives way to tree ferns and low ground cover. Farther out, tree ferns are dwarfed by forest giants called scale trees. "It was a Dr. Seuss world," Johnson said of the scale-tree forests: sun-washed quagmires studded with giant green stalks like asparagus spears, hundreds of feet tall. (Scale trees did not unfurl spreading crowns until the very end of their life cycle.) DiMichele has followed a fallen scale tree for 100 feet, before it disappeared behind coal not yet mined away. "Bill DiMichele realizes he has an entire industry digging for him, creating a tunnel into an ancient world."


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