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Bill Briggs

Direct Phone: (503) ***-****       

Email: b***@***.biz

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Oil Re-Refining Company

4150 N. Suttle Road

Portland, Oregon 97217

United States

Company Description

Oil Re-Refining Co. offering petroleum recycling since 1979. ... more

Find other employees at this company (8)

Background Information

Employment History

Chief Executive Officer Correct Company Oil Re-Refining Inc

Azzawiya Oil Refining Co. Inc (Refinery, Lube Oil Blending Plant & Asphalt Plant)

Web References (36 Total References)


"We don't think we're guilty," said ...

www.oregonlive.com [cached]

"We don't think we're guilty," said Bill Briggs, president of Oil Re-Refining in North Portland.


Portland Eco-Friendly Transportation, Sustainable Commuter Practices, Business Shuttle Services, BRUNELL: Bill Briggs can teach a lesson or two on recycling

www.ecoshuttle.net [cached]

BRUNELL: Bill Briggs can teach a lesson or two on recycling

...
Bill Briggs lives by the axiom that one person's trash is another's treasure.
Before "going green" became fashionable and recycling was a household word, Briggs collected dirty motor oil, filters, lubricants and coolant from factories, auto repair shops and quick lube centers. He re-refines the material and sells the refined products, often to his original suppliers.
For Briggs, it isn't just about the money. He wants to lessen our dependence on foreign oil, and he believes disposing of oil and metals in our landfills pollutes the environment and wastes resources that America needs.
While people can no longer dump used motor oil down storm drains, the Filter Manufacturers Council estimates that only half of all oil filters are recycled. The rest, along with oily rags, are tossed in the trash each day and end up in garbage dumps.
That's why Briggs purchased a fleet of tankers in 1984 and started Oil Re-Refining Co. (ORRCO). An Oregon native, he gave up a solid 17-year career with Chevron to start his company in northeast Portland's industrial section.
His risk paid off, and now the 73 year-old entrepreneur operates in seven western states, with re-refining plants in Portland, Klamath Falls, Reno, Salt Lake City, Billings and Great Falls.
His company provides 55-gallon drums to lube centers and repair shops to discard their used oil filters. When the drums are full, Briggs picks them up and leaves empty containers behind. According to ORRCO data, the average 55 gallon drum contains 250 filters which, when recycled, produce nine gallons of oil and 166 pounds of steel. Each used filter contains about five-eighths cup of oil, enough to contaminate 36,000 gallons of water if inappropriately handled. Once the oil is removed, the steel filters are crushed and sold as scrap.
"I have one goal," says Briggs. "Keep as much as we can out of landfills and reuse everything we can."
In the process, he keeps pollutants out of our water. In fact on his company Web site, there is a photo of a Great Blue Heron with the statement, "One gallon of oil spilled can contaminate 100,000 gallons of water."
Briggs lives by that mantra, and his business reflects his environmental principles. Some of his facilities are built on recovered Super Fund sites, he "scrubs" the air at his processing plants, and by using waste oil to power his operations, his facilities are nearly energy self-sufficient. He cleans and reuses his process water, and nothing harmful is dumped or allowed to seep into the ground.
In addition to recycling machine coolant, motor oil and used oil filters, Briggs collects wastewater, gasoline, emulsified wastewater and other oily solids, heavy bunker fuels, plastic oil bottles and barrels, asphalt, tires, antifreeze - even animal fats and the sludge from grease traps.
Those products are run through distillers, boilers, filters, traps and extruders at ORRCO's processing plants and emerge as "good as new" products. In some instances, Briggs believes they are better than new. The gunk is then reprocessed into asphalt to pave our roads. Just the beginning Despite his considerable success, Bill Briggs says he's just getting started. ORRCO is also a leader in biodiesel production and ships its re-refined fuel to Chevron.
In addition, Briggs is a pioneer in developing "renewable diesel" which relies on animal fats and spent cooking oils from restaurants.
In the future, Briggs also wants to find a way to strip petroleum products out of cars and trucks headed for the junk yard. He points out that everything from the dashboard to tires starts with crude oil and can be reused instead of wasted.
"One of these days we'll be mining our landfills to recover those materials," says Briggs. "Why not save the time and energy up front to re-refine it?"
While some states are rushing to impose regulations and mandates, we should focus instead on encouraging innovative entrepreneurs like Bill Briggs.
After all, he has the right idea: Educate business owners and motorists about the importance of recycling petroleum waste and oil filters and provide them with a convenient, and affordable way to change the world for the better.
...
One Response to "BRUNELL: Bill Briggs can teach a lesson or two on recycling"


Energy Matters Update - January 14, 2008 — NW Energy Coalition

www.nwenergy.org [cached]

Oregon HEAT executive director Roger Rees's search for another fuel-oil company led him to Oil Re-Refining Co. (ORRCO) and its CEO, Bill Briggs.

...
Rather than merely replicating the old program, Briggs and Rees examined its shortcomings and devised a new program that, even in its infancy, is receiving national attention.
...
And since the company can process any oil-related wastes, such as transmission or hydraulic fluid, Rees and Briggs were able to expand the program to include commercial and industrial donors: oil-change companies, garages, car dealers, municipal and school district motor pools, etc.


Home / Washington Business - Current ...

www.awb.org [cached]

Home / Washington Business - Current Issue / Profile: Bill Briggs: Got old oil? Don't dump it — call Bill!

Profile: Bill Briggs: Got old oil? Don't dump it — call Bill!
...
Bill Briggs truly lives by the axiom that one person's trash is another's treasure.
Before "going green" became fashionable and recycling was a household word, Briggs figured out that he could make a buck by collecting used motor oil, filters, lubricants and coolant from factories, auto repair shops and quick lube centers. He was right, and he makes a good living re-refining petroleum products and selling them back to some of the very same suppliers.
It's not just the money that drives him. To Briggs, it's about doing his part to lessen our dependence foreign oil. He believes landfills and oil incinerators waste resources America needs — oil and metals.
The Filter Manufacturers Council estimates that only half of all oil filters are recycled. Many used oil filters, along with oily rags, are tossed in the trash each day and make their way to garbage dumps.
That's why Briggs purchased a fleet of tankers and started the Oil-Re-Refining Co. (ORRCO) in 1984. An Oregon native, he spent 17 years on the fast track with Chevron. Rather than moving his wife and four children every year or so, he took a chance and started his company in northeast Portland's industrial section.
The 73-year-old entrepreneur now operates in seven western states with re-refining plants in Portland, Klamath Falls, Reno, Salt Lake City, Billings and Great Falls.
Avoiding landfills "I have one goal: Keep as much as we can out of the landfills and reuse everything we can," said Briggs. In the process, he keeps pollutants out of our water, is nearly energy self-sufficient and even scrubs the air at his facilities. On his company's Web site (www.orrco.biz) there's a photo of a Great Blue Heron with the statement: "One gallon of oil spilled can contaminate 100,000 gallons of water." Briggs lives by that mantra.
...
Based on what today would be called a "green philosophy," Briggs started his business with a tanker fleet, using siphon systems to pump dirty oil from tanks and collect used oil filters along the route. ORRCO's Washington collection terminals are located in Aberdeen, Seattle, Spokane and the Tri-Cities.
Briggs' company collects machine coolants and motor oils; used oil filters; wastewater; gasoline; emulsified wastewater and other oily solids; heavy bunker fuels; plastic oil bottles and barrels; asphalt; tires; antifreeze; and even animal fats and the sludge found in grease traps. These products are run through distillers, boilers, filters, traps and extruders at ORRCO's six processing plants and emerge as "good-as-new" products. (In some instances, Briggs believes they are better than new.) The gunk left after reprocessing then goes into asphalt to pave our roads.
Briggs estimates that about 20 million gallons of oil are reprocessed into usable products, which includes clean water as a byproduct. He believes the market is largely untapped: only about half of the motor oils are re-refined. Some are collected and then burned for heat or to run boilers in shops and plants.
Renewable diesel ORRCO is also a leader in biodiesel production and ships its re-refined fuel to Chevron. Briggs also has ventured into "renewable diesel," which relies on animal fats and spent cooking oils from restaurants rather than plant oils from corn, canola, sunflowers, soybeans, palm tree, sugar cane or switch grass. Currently, two rendering companies, Baker Commodities and Darling International — both AWB members, along with ORRCO — supply Briggs' refineries with renewable diesel fuel stock.
During a recent visit with Briggs, he proudly showed me seven pyramid-shaped bottles containing his finished products.
...
said Briggs.


BRUNELL: Bill Briggs can teach ...

www.columbian.com [cached]

BRUNELL: Bill Briggs can teach a lesson or two on recycling

...
Bill Briggs lives by the axiom that one person's trash is another's treasure.
Before "going green" became fashionable and recycling was a household word, Briggs collected dirty motor oil, filters, lubricants and coolant from factories, auto repair shops and quick lube centers. He re-refines the material and sells the refined products, often to his original suppliers.
For Briggs, it isn't just about the money. He wants to lessen our dependence on foreign oil, and he believes disposing of oil and metals in our landfills pollutes the environment and wastes resources that America needs.
While people can no longer dump used motor oil down storm drains, the Filter Manufacturers Council estimates that only half of all oil filters are recycled. The rest, along with oily rags, are tossed in the trash each day and end up in garbage dumps.
That's why Briggs purchased a fleet of tankers in 1984 and started Oil Re-Refining Co. (ORRCO). An Oregon native, he gave up a solid 17-year career with Chevron to start his company in northeast Portland's industrial section.
His risk paid off, and now the 73 year-old entrepreneur operates in seven western states, with re-refining plants in Portland, Klamath Falls, Reno, Salt Lake City, Billings and Great Falls.
His company provides 55-gallon drums to lube centers and repair shops to discard their used oil filters. When the drums are full, Briggs picks them up and leaves empty containers behind. According to ORRCO data, the average 55 gallon drum contains 250 filters which, when recycled, produce nine gallons of oil and 166 pounds of steel. Each used filter contains about five-eighths cup of oil, enough to contaminate 36,000 gallons of water if inappropriately handled. Once the oil is removed, the steel filters are crushed and sold as scrap.
"I have one goal," says Briggs. "Keep as much as we can out of landfills and reuse everything we can."
In the process, he keeps pollutants out of our water. In fact on his company Web site, there is a photo of a Great Blue Heron with the statement, "One gallon of oil spilled can contaminate 100,000 gallons of water."
Briggs lives by that mantra, and his business reflects his environmental principles. Some of his facilities are built on recovered Super Fund sites, he "scrubs" the air at his processing plants, and by using waste oil to power his operations, his facilities are nearly energy self-sufficient. He cleans and reuses his process water, and nothing harmful is dumped or allowed to seep into the ground.
In addition to recycling machine coolant, motor oil and used oil filters, Briggs collects wastewater, gasoline, emulsified wastewater and other oily solids, heavy bunker fuels, plastic oil bottles and barrels, asphalt, tires, antifreeze - even animal fats and the sludge from grease traps.
Those products are run through distillers, boilers, filters, traps and extruders at ORRCO's processing plants and emerge as "good as new" products. In some instances, Briggs believes they are better than new. The gunk is then reprocessed into asphalt to pave our roads.
Just the beginning
Despite his considerable success, Bill Briggs says he's just getting started. ORRCO is also a leader in biodiesel production and ships its re-refined fuel to Chevron.
In addition, Briggs is a pioneer in developing "renewable diesel" which relies on animal fats and spent cooking oils from restaurants.
In the future, Briggs also wants to find a way to strip petroleum products out of cars and trucks headed for the junk yard. He points out that everything from the dashboard to tires starts with crude oil and can be reused instead of wasted.
"One of these days we'll be mining our landfills to recover those materials," says Briggs. "Why not save the time and energy up front to re-refine it?"
While some states are rushing to impose regulations and mandates, we should focus instead on encouraging innovative entrepreneurs like Bill Briggs.
After all, he has the right idea: Educate business owners and motorists about the importance of recycling petroleum waste and oil filters and provide them with a convenient, and affordable way to change the world for the better.
...
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