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This profile was last updated on 10/4/2012 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

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Wrong Benjamin Victor?

Benjamin C. Victor

Founder and President

Ocean Science Foundation Inc

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Background Information

Employment History

Photographer

Zipcode Zoo


Founder and President

Ocean Science Foundation Inc


Web References(15 Total References)


WHAT'S NEW

www.dynastymarine.net [cached]

Here is an interesting read on hamlets of the genus Hypoplectrus, written by Benjamin Victor with the Ocean Science Foundation.
Enjoy! Journal of the Ocean Science Foundation, 2012, Volume 5


FishBOL

www.FISHBOL.org [cached]

Benjamin Victor
Ocean Science Foundation


Reef Protection International - Board of Advisors

www.reefprotect.org [cached]

Benjamin C. Victor
Benjamin C. Victor, M.D. Ph.D. Founder and President Ocean Science Foundation Dr. Benjamin Victor has a variety of interests - fish biology, evolution, medicine, mycology (molds), geography, economics. His primary interest is in the larval ecology of coral reef fishes and its role in determining biogeography and population dynamics. Dr. Victor has worked in Panama, Galapagos, Baja California, Palau, Brazil and Bali with research concentration on the wrasse family (Labridae). He received his Ph.D. in population biology at the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1986, working on tropical reef fishes and the importance of recruitment and larval ecology to reef populations. After that, Dr. Victor continued his research on fishes, while graduating from medical school at The University of California at Irvine. This was followed by an internship at Stanford University Hospital in Palo Alto, California. Dr. Victor returned to Southern California to finish a residency in Anatomic and Clinical Pathology at UC Irvine. Since then he has worked as a consultant in medicine and ecology, and received an M.B.A. from UC Irvine. In 2001, Dr. Victor started the non-profit Ocean Science Foundation to facilitate coral reef research by providing a research vessel to conservation and academic NGOs. He is also the editor of CORALREEFFISH.COM, a website devoted to internet-speed scientific communication for coral reef fish biologists. With his wide-ranging experience,


www.underwatertimes.com

The fish was sent to Dr. Benjamin Victor of the Ocean Science Foundation in California, who used a new biochemical technique known as barcoding to match DNA from the larva to an adult fish Victor himself stumbled upon a quarter of a century earlier in Panama.Testing confirmed that the fish was in fact a new species, genetically different from its closest know relatives by about 25%.The specimen in Jones's trap turned out to be a Coryphopterus kuna, a new species of goby named after the indigenous people of Panama. This discovery marks the first vertebrate to have its genetic barcode included in its original species description, which was published by Victor in the July 2007 issue of Zootaxa.The process involves identifying and isolating a section of an organism's mitochondrial DNA to allow researchers a simple and definitive method of recognizing and categorizing existing species by assigning each a unique, searchable DNA barcode. "DNA barcoding allowed me to match the larva to the adult ... [and] prove to the other fish biologists that this was a new species," said Victor.


www.eurekalert.org

The fish was sent to Dr. Benjamin Victor of the Ocean Science Foundation in California, who used a new biochemical technique known as barcoding to match DNA from the larva to an adult fish Victor himself stumbled upon a quarter of a century earlier in Panama.Testing confirmed that the fish was in fact a new species, genetically different from its closest know relatives by about 25%.The specimen in Jones's trap turned out to be a Coryphopterus kuna, a new species of goby named after the indigenous people of Panama.This discovery marks the first vertebrate to have its genetic barcode included in its original species description, which was published by Victor in the July 2007 issue of Zootaxa http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2007f/zt01526p061.pdf.The process involves identifying and isolating a section of an organism's mitochondrial DNA to allow researchers a simple and definitive method of recognizing and categorizing existing species by assigning each a unique, searchable DNA barcode."DNA barcoding allowed me to match the larva to the adult ... [and] prove to the other fish biologists that this was a new species," said Victor.


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