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Wrong Benjamin Beck?

Benjamin B. Beck

Partner

Earthpark

HQ Phone:  (515) 243-9300

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Earthpark

1533 Linden Street Ste 200

Des Moines, Iowa,50309

United States

Company Description

Earthpark is organized as a not-for-profit entity, governed by a 20-person board of directors chaired by former Iowa Governor Robert Ray. Business leaders, educators, scientists, philanthropists, and former state government leaders serve on the Earthpark Board... more.

Find other employees at this company (6)

Background Information

Employment History

Associate Director and Curator

the Smithsonian Institution


Director of Conservation

Great Ape Trust of Iowa


Coordinator of Reintroduction

AMLD


Vice President of Life Sciences

Indianapolis Zoo


Associate Director

National Zoological Park


Co-chair

Association of Zoos and Aquariums


Research Curator and Curator of Primates

Brookfield Zoo


Affiliations

GLT

Board Member


World Conservation Union

Member of the Primate Specialist Group


Associação Mico Leão Dourado

Founding Member


SGLT

Board Member


Management Committee

Member


International Lion Tamarin Conservation

Member


Primate Specialist Group

Position, Executive Committee


Aquarium

Advisor


American Zoo

Advisor


Thirteen Gold Monkeys

Founder


Education

MA

Boston University


PhD

University of Chicago


Web References(199 Total References)


Earthpark - USA | Earthpark Development Team

www.earthpark.org [cached]

Ben Beck
Dr. Ben Beck Conservation Programming A noted scientist and widely published author, Ben is Director of Conservation for Great Ape Trust of Iowa. He also directs the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, which is creating the first national conservation park in Rwanda. A comparative psychologist by training, Ben was a research curator at Chicago's Brookfield zoo for more than a decade and later associate director and curator of the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, D.C. for another 20 years. During that latter period he served on the negotiating committee that brought giant pandas to the zoo from China. Ben also coordinated the successful reintroduction of golden lion tamarins into the Atlantic rainforest in Brazil.


Great Ape Trust | Gishwati Forest to Become Rwanda National Park, Great Ape Trust Concludes Successful Initiative

www.greatapetrust.org [cached]

Great Ape Trust and Earthpark Founder, Ted Townsend tours Gishwati Forest in late 2007 with Rwandan officials and Dr. Benjamin Beck, the Trust's conservation director.
GACP's Dr. Ben Beck said, "you can't save chimpanzees without helping people and you can't help people without saving chimpanzees." Here, GACP's first meeting with Gishwati area villagers. "To a conservationist, nothing can be more satisfying than the restoration of a damaged ecosystem and its designation as a national park that will secure its biodiversity in perpetuity," said Dr. Benjamin Beck, conservation director of Great Ape Trust, which directs and supports GACP. Beck, Clay and Trust director of communications Al Setka will continue to provide advice. It's bigger, richer and better understood than it was just four years ago," Beck said.


'Forest of Hope' teaches Rwandan youths about great ape conservation

www.iowagreatapes.com [cached]

The futures of the students and the chimpanzees are closely tied, according to Dr. Benjamin Beck, director of conservation at Great Ape Trust, a partner with Earthpark and the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, an ambitious reforestation project and ecological research effort in what was once Rwanda's second-largest forest.
"We cannot save the chimpanzees and their habitat without also helping the local people living near the forests," Beck said. "She has become a heroine, a role model, and some of the students have said they want to be her assistants," Beck said. Located near the equator, Rwanda is "breathtakingly beautiful," Beck said. The Gishwati Forest yields views of Lake Kivu, one of Great Lakes of Africa and the largest of numerous freshwater bodies in the valleys of Rwanda, and the mountains of Democratic Republic of Congo. Meeting the needs will cost about $250,000, expenses that were neither anticipated nor budgeted, Beck said. Great Ape Trust is seeking partners to assist in the school project, Beck emphasized. The birth of an infant chimpanzee, the first born since the beginning of the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, is encouraging on several fronts, according to Dr. Benjamin Beck, Great Ape Trust's director of conservation. The chimpanzee population in the small remnant forest has grown from 12 to 14; an adult female that had not been recognized before has been identified; the small population is actively reproducing, and the Gishwati Forest is once again a place where a female can raise a baby. Watch video here > The Ankeny students wrote a letter to the Kinihira students that Beck and Ted Townsend, founder of Great Ape Trust and Earthpark, also a partner along with the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, hand-delivered during a recent two-week trip to Rwanda to further the project's goals. Beck and Townsend brought back to Iowa letters to the Ankeny students and teachers expressing interest in solidifying the bonds of an international friendship. In discussing the differences, "the students just focused on the similarities in their lives and read about each other with interest and fascination," Beck said. "It's easy for adults to make more of the dramatic cultural contrasts than the kids do. For them, it's kids communicating with kids, with no value judgments or aspirations to become westernized." The relationship between the schools in Iowa and Rwanda is still informal, but Beck said there are many similarities that make a formal friendship between the schools possibility. Rwanda has adopted English as its official language, and the students speak English in the classroom and elsewhere, except for some use of the mother tongue, Kinya Rwanda, in casual conversations. The students are in class for 10 and one-half hours each day, Monday through Friday. "The big question is," Beck said, "where do we go from here?"


'Forest of Hope' teaches Rwandan youths about great ape conservation

www.greatapetrust.org [cached]

The futures of the students and the chimpanzees are closely tied, according to Dr. Benjamin Beck, director of conservation at Great Ape Trust, a partner with Earthpark and the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, an ambitious reforestation project and ecological research effort in what was once Rwanda's second-largest forest.
"We cannot save the chimpanzees and their habitat without also helping the local people living near the forests," Beck said. "She has become a heroine, a role model, and some of the students have said they want to be her assistants," Beck said. Located near the equator, Rwanda is "breathtakingly beautiful," Beck said. The Gishwati Forest yields views of Lake Kivu, one of Great Lakes of Africa and the largest of numerous freshwater bodies in the valleys of Rwanda, and the mountains of Democratic Republic of Congo. Meeting the needs will cost about $250,000, expenses that were neither anticipated nor budgeted, Beck said. Great Ape Trust is seeking partners to assist in the school project, Beck emphasized. The birth of an infant chimpanzee, the first born since the beginning of the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, is encouraging on several fronts, according to Dr. Benjamin Beck, Great Ape Trust's director of conservation. The chimpanzee population in the small remnant forest has grown from 12 to 14; an adult female that had not been recognized before has been identified; the small population is actively reproducing, and the Gishwati Forest is once again a place where a female can raise a baby. Watch video here > The Ankeny students wrote a letter to the Kinihira students that Beck and Ted Townsend, founder of Great Ape Trust and Earthpark, also a partner along with the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, hand-delivered during a recent two-week trip to Rwanda to further the project's goals. Beck and Townsend brought back to Iowa letters to the Ankeny students and teachers expressing interest in solidifying the bonds of an international friendship. In discussing the differences, "the students just focused on the similarities in their lives and read about each other with interest and fascination," Beck said. "It's easy for adults to make more of the dramatic cultural contrasts than the kids do. For them, it's kids communicating with kids, with no value judgments or aspirations to become westernized." The relationship between the schools in Iowa and Rwanda is still informal, but Beck said there are many similarities that make a formal friendship between the schools possibility. Rwanda has adopted English as its official language, and the students speak English in the classroom and elsewhere, except for some use of the mother tongue, Kinya Rwanda, in casual conversations. The students are in class for 10 and one-half hours each day, Monday through Friday. "The big question is," Beck said, "where do we go from here?"


Great Ape Trust | 'Forest of Hope' teaches Rwandan youths about great ape conservation

www.greatapetrust.org [cached]

The futures of the students and the chimpanzees are closely tied, according to Dr. Benjamin Beck, director of conservation at Great Ape Trust, a partner with Earthpark and the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, an ambitious reforestation project and ecological research effort in what was once Rwanda's second-largest forest.
Gishwati once extended 1,000 square kilometers (approximately a quarter of a million acres, or 100,000 hectacres), but was reduced to about one-fourth that size by the late 1980s due to human encroachment, deforestation and small-scale farming. Further encroachment resulted with the resettlement of refugees after the civil war and genocide of the mid-1990s. The Gishwati program's aim is to protect and preserve the forest resources and, thus, the chimpanzees, now numbering 14, living there, as well as provide for sustainable use by the people living near the forest's edge. "We cannot save the chimpanzees and their habitat without also helping the local people living near the forests," Beck said. "She has become a heroine, a role model, and some of the students have said they want to be her assistants," Beck said. Located near the equator, Rwanda is "breathtakingly beautiful," Beck said. The Gishwati Forest yields views of Lake Kivu, one of Great Lakes of Africa and the largest of numerous freshwater bodies in the valleys of Rwanda, and the mountains of Democratic Republic of Congo. The school's needs - modest by American standards - include creating 12 classrooms in the long, narrow building housing the 650 Kinihira Primary School students, building two blocks of bathrooms, installing two rainwater collection systems, and developing one basketball and one volleyball playground. Equipment needs include 350 desks for students and 18 tables for teachers. Meeting the needs will cost about $250,000, expenses that were neither anticipated nor budgeted, Beck said. Great Ape Trust is seeking partners to assist in the school project. Beck emphasized The Ankeny students wrote a letter to the Kinihira students that Beck and Ted Townsend, founder of Great Ape Trust and Earthpark, also a partner along with the Rwandan government in the Gishwati Area Conservation Program, hand-delivered during a recent two-week trip to Rwanda to further the project's goals. Beck and Townsend brought back to Iowa letters to the Ankeny students and teachers expressing interest in solidifying the bonds of an international friendship. In discussing the differences, "the students just focused on the similarities in their lives and read about each other with interest and fascination," Beck said. "It's easy for adults to make more of the dramatic cultural contrasts than the kids do. For them, it's kids communicating with kids, with no value judgments or aspirations to become westernized." The relationship between the schools in Iowa and Rwanda is still informal, but Beck said there are many similarities that make a formal friendship between the schools possibility. Rwanda has adopted English as its official language, and the students speak English in the classroom and elsewhere, except for some use of the mother tongue, Kinya Rwanda, in casual conversations. The students are in class for 10 and one-half hours each day, Monday through Friday. "The big question is," Beck said, "where do we go from here?"


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