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Bato Kannon

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Background Information

Employment History

Horse Headed

Hase Dera Temple


Protector

Animals


Horse Head


Web References(4 Total References)


Kannon Bodhisattva (Bosatsu) - Goddess of Mercy, One Who Hears Prayers of the World, Japanese Buddhism Art History

onmarkproductions.com [cached]

Bato Kannon (Horse Headed)
Bato Kannon = Horse-Headed Kannon Bato Kannon (Japanese) Also spelled Bato or Batou Bato Kannon = Horse Headed Kannon, Manifestation of Kannon Bodhisattva, Treasure of Hase Dera Temple, Kamakura One of 33 Kannon presented to Bato Kannon, Heian period, 12th century, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Painting on Silk, H = 166.1, W = 82.7 cm Courtesy: The AMICA Library spacer Bato Kannon ???? Horse-Headed Kannon. Protector of Animals. Bato Kannon appears in the Mahavairocana Sutra (Jp. = Dainichikyo ???; composed sometime in the 6th / 7th century AD) and other tantric texts. He is thus a member of the esoteric pantheon. Bato is also one of the Six Kannon. In this latter role, Bato protects those reborn in the animal realm (chikushodo ???), a realm characterized by stupidity and servitude. Effigies of the Six Kannon began appearing in Japan in the early-mid 10th century onward and were prayed to for the welfare of the dead. The scriptural basis for the six can be traced back to a late 6th-century Tendai text from China, although Bato was not part of the original six but rather inserted some four centuries later. See Six Kannon for details. Bato Kannon is also one of the Myo-o ?? (Skt. = Vidyaraja), the warlike and wrathful deities of Esoteric Buddhism. In this role, the deity is known as Bato Myo-o ???? and included in a grouping known as the Hachidai Myo-o ???? (lit. Eight Great Myo-o; Chn. = Ba Dà Míngwáng). In Japan, farmers pray to Bato Kannon for the safety and preservation of their horses and cattle. Bato Kannon is not only said to protect dumb animals, particularly those who labor for mankind, but extends those powers to protecting their spirits and bringing them ease and a happier life than they experienced while on earth. (Source: Myths and Legends of Japan, by F. Hadland Davis, 1913) In esoteric traditions, Bato Kannon appears in the Taizokai (Womb World) Mandala in the Lotus Court (Rengebu-in ????), also known as the Kannon-in ???. Says the Digital Dictionary of Buddhism (abridged; sign in with user name = guest): "In Japan, from the beginning of the Tokugawa period, steles of Bato Kannon were dedicated to a deceased horse, as attested by numerous roadside steles bearing its figure and the inscription ??? uma kuyo. In the Japanese Shingon tradition, Bato Kannon is the strong protector of the bodhima??a (Skt. = awakening seat; the place where one attains enlightenment). Bato Kannon is invoked during the Juhachido ??? practice when closing the vajra net to seal the sacred space. Juhachido means eighteen paths. In the two mandala of the esoteric sects, each has nine principal objects of worship. Practitioners devote themselves to meditating on one of these eighteen each day. Says JAANUS (abridged): Bato Kannon. Kannon in an angry (funnu ??) form. Bato is also considered to be the angry form of the Buddha Muryoju (Muryoju) ???. He is distinguished by the white horse's head that he wears like a crown. The horse is one of the symbols of dominion of the "Ideal King" (Kyoryorinjin ???? or Kyoryojo-o ????), known as Chakravartin in Sanskrit. There are many different forms of Bato having one to three faces and two to eight arms, and he holds different attributes in different images. In the Kannon Section of the Taizokai Mandala ??????, he has three faces and two arms, is red in color, and makes the komponin ??? hand gesture (mudra) in front of his chest. However, in art forms, he appears most commonly with three faces and eight arms. The cult of Bato appears not to have been as popular as those of the other esoteric Kannon, although it is recorded that an image of Bato was enshrined in Saidaiji Temple ??? in Nara in the late 8th century. Bato is sometimes found in sets of the Six Kannon, but independent images dating from the Heian period (794-1185) are rare. Well-known examples dating from the Kamakura and Muromachi periods include the standing statues in Kanzeonji Temple ???? in Fukuoka prefecture and Joruriji (Joruriji) Temple ???? in Kyoto, as well as the painted image of seated Bato in the Boston Museum of Art. In the Edo period (1600-1868), Bato came to be worshipped as a protector of horses due to his iconography and his role as savior of those in the realm of animals. Many remaining stone statues (sekibutsu ??) of Bato were once set in place to protect travelers and their horses from injury on dangerous paths. It is also thought that Bato became conflated with a folk horse deity believed to be the vehicle of a Shinto deity (kami ?) who rides between this world and the sacred realm. Because of this identification, he became the protector of horses and the Buddhist counterpart (honjibutsu ???) of deities of common Komagata ?? (lit. "Horse-shaped") shrines, which are found all over Japan. . Nowadays you even find bicycles in front of the many stone votive statues to Bato on waysides. Gigantic effigies of Kannon are known as Dai-Kannon ???. Kannon who prevents dementia in the elderly. A modern form of Kannon. Writes scholar Mark R. Mullins: "Another new role for Kannon is connected to the 'graying' of Japanese society and the increasing concerns of the elderly about growing old, fears of senile dementia (and Alzheimer's disease), and long illnesses followed by an unpleasant death. Kannon's powers have been expanded to include the 'suppression of senility' (boke-fuji ????), and s/he has become a central figure in Pokkuri-Dera ?????, or temples where the elderly -- those lacking adequate family support -- go to pray for a sudden or painless death. What distinguishes this Kannon from others are a pair of elderly male and female figures kneeling at its feet in a gesture of supplication. An entirely new medical role is thus being attributed to Kannon, who is here called the Kannon Who Heals or Prevents Senility (Bokefuji Kannon). Bato Kannon (Horse-Headed Kannon), for example, an esoteric savior of those reborn in the realm of animals, was already well-known among the common folk in the Tokugawa period, when numerous farmers prayed to Bato Kannon for the safety and preservation of their horses and cattle. Innumerable stone steles of Bato Kannon were erected in the Tokugawa and Edo periods, for this deity was intimately connected with protecting dumb animals, particularly those who labored for mankind, and with protecting their spirits and bringing them ease and a happier life than they experienced while on earth. Says scholar Mark R. Mullins in his article The Many Forms and Functions of Kannon in Japanese Religion and Culture: "Kannon has become a favorite comforting figure used by the numerous pet cemeteries that have been built across Japan over the past two decades. In addition to the services offered for pets at these specialized cemeteries and temples, it is also possible to purchase online a Pet Kannon for 12,600 yen (US$120), which has a standing image of Kannon with several pets at his/her feet. Bato (Horse-Headed) Kannon Texts concerning Senju (1000-Armed) Kannon ????, Nyoirin (Omnipotent) Kannon ????? and Bato (Horse-Headed) Kannon ???? date from the same time. Images of Kannon were made as part of Emperor Shomu's ?? (701-56) effort to impose Buddhist structure on Japan. Temples dedicated to Kannon were founded, many following the apparition of the deity or the miraculous appearance of an image. A temple dedicated to Kannon was often built in a mountain, beside a rock formation, near a spring, or near some other remarkable landscape feature, suggesting that the site was already sacred and was adapted to Buddhist use. Animals, Bato Kannon, Horse-Headed Kannon, 173.3 cm NOTE 2:Bato Kannon was not part of the original six appearing in the Mohe Zhiguan ???? (circa 594 AD); according to the Hisho Mondo ???? by Raiyu ?? in the 13th century, Bato was inserted into the group by Ningai ?? (951-1046), replacing Shishimui Kanzeon ???????. ???? Of Lion Courage, Fearless (Bato Kannon, Horse-Headed Kannon) One of 33 Forms of Kannon in Japan. In Japanese paintings, Ryuzu Kannon (one of the 33 traditional forms of Kannon in Japan) is typically shown atop a dragon (a legendary member of the Vedic group of serpentine creatures known in Sanskrit as the Naga). Garuda (birdman) & Bato Kannon (Horse Head) are among these deities. A set of 33 was presented to Hase Dera by Shogun Yoshimasa (1449-1471 AD). More photos below. 33 Kannon & the Lotus Sutra The Lotus Sutra is one of the best known Mahayana scriptures. It's 25th Chapter is popularly called the Kannon Sutra and often treated as an independent text. The full


Kannon Bodhisattva (Bosatsu) - Goddess of Mercy, One Who Hears Prayers of the World, Japanese Buddhism Art History

www.onmarkproductions.com [cached]

Bato Kannon (Horse Headed)
Bato Kannon = Horse-Headed Kannon Bato Kannon (Japanese) Also spelled Bato or Batou Bato Kannon = Horse Headed Kannon, Manifestation of Kannon Bodhisattva, Treasure of Hase Dera Temple, Kamakura One of 33 Kannon presented to Bato Kannon, Heian period, 12th century, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Painting on Silk, H = 166.1, W = 82.7 cm Courtesy: The AMICA Library spacer Bato Kannon ???? Horse-Headed Kannon. Protector of Animals. Bato Kannon appears in the Mahavairocana Sutra (Jp. = Dainichikyo ???; composed sometime in the 6th / 7th century AD) and other tantric texts. He is thus a member of the esoteric pantheon. Bato is also one of the Six Kannon. In this latter role, Bato protects those reborn in the animal realm (chikushodo ???), a realm characterized by stupidity and servitude. Effigies of the Six Kannon began appearing in Japan in the early-mid 10th century onward and were prayed to for the welfare of the dead. The scriptural basis for the six can be traced back to a late 6th-century Tendai text from China, although Bato was not part of the original six but rather inserted some four centuries later. See Six Kannon for details. Bato Kannon is also one of the Myo-o ?? (Skt. = Vidyaraja), the warlike and wrathful deities of Esoteric Buddhism. In this role, the deity is known as Bato Myo-o ???? and included in a grouping known as the Hachidai Myo-o ???? (lit. Eight Great Myo-o; Chn. = Ba Dà Míngwáng). In Japan, farmers pray to Bato Kannon for the safety and preservation of their horses and cattle. Bato Kannon is not only said to protect dumb animals, particularly those who labor for mankind, but extends those powers to protecting their spirits and bringing them ease and a happier life than they experienced while on earth. (Source: Myths and Legends of Japan, by F. Hadland Davis, 1913) In esoteric traditions, Bato Kannon appears in the Taizokai (Womb World) Mandala in the Lotus Court (Rengebu-in ????), also known as the Kannon-in ???. Says the Digital Dictionary of Buddhism (abridged; sign in with user name = guest): "In Japan, from the beginning of the Tokugawa period, steles of Bato Kannon were dedicated to a deceased horse, as attested by numerous roadside steles bearing its figure and the inscription ??? uma kuyo. In the Japanese Shingon tradition, Bato Kannon is the strong protector of the bodhima??a (Skt. = awakening seat; the place where one attains enlightenment). Bato Kannon is invoked during the Juhachido ??? practice when closing the vajra net to seal the sacred space. Juhachido means eighteen paths. In the two mandala of the esoteric sects, each has nine principal objects of worship. Practitioners devote themselves to meditating on one of these eighteen each day. Says JAANUS (abridged): Bato Kannon. Kannon in an angry (funnu ??) form. Bato is also considered to be the angry form of the Buddha Muryoju (Muryoju) ???. He is distinguished by the white horse's head that he wears like a crown. The horse is one of the symbols of dominion of the "Ideal King" (Kyoryorinjin ???? or Kyoryojo-o ????), known as Chakravartin in Sanskrit. There are many different forms of Bato having one to three faces and two to eight arms, and he holds different attributes in different images. In the Kannon Section of the Taizokai Mandala ??????, he has three faces and two arms, is red in color, and makes the komponin ??? hand gesture (mudra) in front of his chest. However, in art forms, he appears most commonly with three faces and eight arms. The cult of Bato appears not to have been as popular as those of the other esoteric Kannon, although it is recorded that an image of Bato was enshrined in Saidaiji Temple ??? in Nara in the late 8th century. Bato is sometimes found in sets of the Six Kannon, but independent images dating from the Heian period (794-1185) are rare. Well-known examples dating from the Kamakura and Muromachi periods include the standing statues in Kanzeonji Temple ???? in Fukuoka prefecture and Joruriji (Joruriji) Temple ???? in Kyoto, as well as the painted image of seated Bato in the Boston Museum of Art. In the Edo period (1600-1868), Bato came to be worshipped as a protector of horses due to his iconography and his role as savior of those in the realm of animals. Many remaining stone statues (sekibutsu ??) of Bato were once set in place to protect travelers and their horses from injury on dangerous paths. It is also thought that Bato became conflated with a folk horse deity believed to be the vehicle of a Shinto deity (kami ?) who rides between this world and the sacred realm. Because of this identification, he became the protector of horses and the Buddhist counterpart (honjibutsu ???) of deities of common Komagata ?? (lit. "Horse-shaped") shrines, which are found all over Japan. . Nowadays you even find bicycles in front of the many stone votive statues to Bato on waysides. Gigantic effigies of Kannon are known as Dai-Kannon ???. Kannon who prevents dementia in the elderly. A modern form of Kannon. Writes scholar Mark R. Mullins: "Another new role for Kannon is connected to the 'graying' of Japanese society and the increasing concerns of the elderly about growing old, fears of senile dementia (and Alzheimer's disease), and long illnesses followed by an unpleasant death. Kannon's powers have been expanded to include the 'suppression of senility' (boke-fuji ????), and s/he has become a central figure in Pokkuri-Dera ?????, or temples where the elderly -- those lacking adequate family support -- go to pray for a sudden or painless death. What distinguishes this Kannon from others are a pair of elderly male and female figures kneeling at its feet in a gesture of supplication. An entirely new medical role is thus being attributed to Kannon, who is here called the Kannon Who Heals or Prevents Senility (Bokefuji Kannon). Bato Kannon (Horse-Headed Kannon), for example, an esoteric savior of those reborn in the realm of animals, was already well-known among the common folk in the Tokugawa period, when numerous farmers prayed to Bato Kannon for the safety and preservation of their horses and cattle. Innumerable stone steles of Bato Kannon were erected in the Tokugawa and Edo periods, for this deity was intimately connected with protecting dumb animals, particularly those who labored for mankind, and with protecting their spirits and bringing them ease and a happier life than they experienced while on earth. Says scholar Mark R. Mullins in his article The Many Forms and Functions of Kannon in Japanese Religion and Culture: "Kannon has become a favorite comforting figure used by the numerous pet cemeteries that have been built across Japan over the past two decades. In addition to the services offered for pets at these specialized cemeteries and temples, it is also possible to purchase online a Pet Kannon for 12,600 yen (US$120), which has a standing image of Kannon with several pets at his/her feet. Bato (Horse-Headed) Kannon Texts concerning Senju (1000-Armed) Kannon ????, Nyoirin (Omnipotent) Kannon ????? and Bato (Horse-Headed) Kannon ???? date from the same time. Images of Kannon were made as part of Emperor Shomu's ?? (701-56) effort to impose Buddhist structure on Japan. Temples dedicated to Kannon were founded, many following the apparition of the deity or the miraculous appearance of an image. A temple dedicated to Kannon was often built in a mountain, beside a rock formation, near a spring, or near some other remarkable landscape feature, suggesting that the site was already sacred and was adapted to Buddhist use. Animals, Bato Kannon, Horse-Headed Kannon, 173.3 cm NOTE 2:Bato Kannon was not part of the original six appearing in the Mohe Zhiguan ???? (circa 594 AD); according to the Hisho Mondo ???? by Raiyu ?? in the 13th century, Bato was inserted into the group by Ningai ?? (951-1046), replacing Shishimui Kanzeon ???????. ???? Of Lion Courage, Fearless (Bato Kannon, Horse-Headed Kannon) One of 33 Forms of Kannon in Japan. In Japanese paintings, Ryuzu Kannon (one of the 33 traditional forms of Kannon in Japan) is typically shown atop a dragon (a legendary member of the Vedic group of serpentine creatures known in Sanskrit as the Naga). Garuda (birdman) & Bato Kannon (Horse Head) are among these deities. A set of 33 was presented to Hase Dera by Shogun Yoshimasa (1449-1471 AD). More photos below. 33 Kannon & the Lotus Sutra The Lotus Sutra is one of the best known Mahayana scriptures. It's 25th Chapter is popularly called the Kannon Sutra and often treated as an independent text. The


www.midorigallery.com

Bato Kannon(horse head) (Mercy Bodhisattva)
One of the six forms of Kannon, the Bato Kannon is also considered a manifestation of Amida (Buddha of Infinite Light). The historical Japanese would pray to Bato Kannon for the safety and preservation of their horses.


Glossary of Japanese Sculptors (Busshi), Schools, Styles, & Workshops. Who Made Japan's Buddha Statues?

www.onmarkproductions.com [cached]

One of the Seven Great Temples of Nara, the temple today lies mostly in ruin, a sad reminder of its former glory, although it still houses some wonderful wood statues for viewing, including an 11-Headed Kannon and Bato (Horse-Headed) Kannon.


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