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2009-01-01T00:00:00.000Z

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Background Information

Employment History

Mycologist, Laboratoire De Cryptogamie
National Museum of Natural History

Curator
Mycology Herbarium

Associate Professor In the Department of Systematics and Evolution
Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle

NEMF

Curator
$resume.company.value

Education

Ph.D

University of Gent , Belgium

Web References (11 Total References)


Program: NEMF 2009

www.nemf.org [cached]

Bart Buyck, Mycologist, Laboratoire de Cryptogamie of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, and Curator of its Mycology Herbarium. "Take a Trip - a presentation in 3D"


Internationally recognized mushroom ...

www.thicketofdiversity.org [cached]

Internationally recognized mushroom researcher Bart Buyck recently visited the East Texas woods to contribute to inventory work conducted through the Thicket of Diversity All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory. Working with Bart is Valerie Hofstetter of the Department of Plant Protection at Agroscope in Nyon, Switzerland.

...
Buyck obtained his Ph.D in 1989 at the University of Gent, Belgium. He received the Augustin Pyramus de Candolle prize of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Geneva, Switzerland. He continued his research in Belgium and Central Africa and since 1996 joined the Laboratoire de Cryptogamie of the National Natural History Museum in Paris, France. There he serves as Associate Professor in the Department of Systematics and Evolution where he is also curator of the Mycology Herbarium.
Buyck has collected edible and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms on several continents for more than 30 years and is especially interested in one particular group of mushrooms, Russula. With distinctive umbrella shaped caps on stems, these fungi are commonly found in the major types of forests on earth. This mushroom genus was first described in 1796, and over 750 species have been identified to date, yet most Russulas still remain undescribed and Buyck estimates the number of different Russula species in the United States alone to be likely as much as 1,500. Russula mushrooms are not easy to identify and distinguishing individual species usually involves observation of its microscopic characteristics or a taste test. Bart's work includes the development of a software program, ALLRUS, to assist in the identification and classification of Russula. Most members of this fleshy fungi group are edible, but some can cause gastrointestinal symptoms when eaten raw or undercooked.
Buyck is also a world authority on the genus Cantharellus and described 5 new species of chanterelles from East Texas, including Cantharellus texensis, a species that was originally described from the Lance Rosier Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve.
...
According to the Big Thicket Association (BTA) website, Bart Buyck is one of 3 scientists who described a rare, new species to science in 2008 for the Big Thicket, Russula texensis.
...
Bart Buyck & Valerie Hofstetter at Jack Gore Baygall Unit, Big Thicket National Preserve 6/27/2014


Cascade Mycological Society

cascademyco.org [cached]

Bart Buyck from Paris will present "Russulas"

Several of the regional mycology clubs have worked together to bring Dr. Bart Buyck to the PNW. He is here to gather local Russulas for study and to talk to the various mycology clubs about his research. This is a special meeting to accommodate Bart's visit to Eugene.
Dr. Bart Buyck is Associate Professor in the Department of Systematics and Evolution at the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, France. Bart obtained his PhD in 1989 at the University of Gent in Belgium with a revision of Russula in Africa for which he received the Augustin Pyramus de Candolle prize of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Geneva, Switzerland. He has continued his research in tropical mycology, first at the University of Louvain-la-neuve, Belgium, and later at the University of Bujumbura in Burundi, Central Africa. Since 1996 Bart joined the Laboratoire de Crytogamie of the National History Museum in Paris, France, where he is responsible for the Mycology Herbarium.
Bart Buyck Throughout his career, Bart has been collecting edible and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in many Central and East African countries as well as other countries around the world. He is particularly interested in Russulas, a group for which he is widely acknowledged to be the world's foremost expert, and also Cantharellaceae.


Actionbioscience | Evolutionary Biologists Aim to Protect Madagascar's Plants and Animals

www.actionbioscience.org [cached]

Bart Buyck, of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, who studies fungi, said, "For two centuries, the whole systematics [of fungi] has been based on what they look like.


Internationally recognized mushroom ...

www.thicketofdiversity.org [cached]

Internationally recognized mushroom researcher Bart Buyck recently visited the East Texas woods to contribute to inventory work conducted through the Thicket of Diversity All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory. Working with Bart is Valerie Hofstetter of the Department of Plant Protection at Agroscope in Nyon, Switzerland.

...
Buyck obtained his Ph.D in 1989 at the University of Gent, Belgium. He received the Augustin Pyramus de Candolle prize of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Geneva, Switzerland. He continued his research in Belgium and Central Africa and since 1996 joined the Laboratoire de Cryptogamie of the National Natural History Museum in Paris, France. There he serves as Associate Professor in the Department of Systematics and Evolution where he is also curator of the Mycology Herbarium.
Buyck has collected edible and ectomycorrhizal mushrooms on several continents for more than 30 years and is especially interested in one particular group of mushrooms, Russula. With distinctive umbrella shaped caps on stems, these fungi are commonly found in the major types of forests on earth. This mushroom genus was first described in 1796, and over 750 species have been identified to date, yet most Russulas still remain undescribed and Buyck estimates the number of different Russula species in the United States alone to be likely as much as 1,500. Russula mushrooms are not easy to identify and distinguishing individual species usually involves observation of its microscopic characteristics or a taste test. Bart's work includes the development of a software program, ALLRUS, to assist in the identification and classification of Russula. Most members of this fleshy fungi group are edible, but some can cause gastrointestinal symptoms when eaten raw or undercooked.
Buyck is also a world authority on the genus Cantharellus and described 5 new species of chanterelles from East Texas, including Cantharellus texensis, a species that was originally described from the Lance Rosier Unit of the Big Thicket National Preserve.
...
According to the Big Thicket Association (BTA) website, Bart Buyck is one of 3 scientists who described a rare, new species to science in 2008 for the Big Thicket, Russula texensis.

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