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This profile was last updated on 12/10/08  and contains information from public web pages.

Lord President of the Council and...

The House
 
Background

Employment History

Web References
Parmoor considered that ...
granatowa.policja.pl.wikimiki.org, 10 Dec 2008 [cached]
Parmoor considered that his elevation to the peerage in a semi-judicial role had removed any previous political affiliations. The war had a profound effect on Parmoor's political views, as he considered the decision to go to war a disaster. He opposed conscription and sympathised with Conscientious objectors, whom he thought were subject to excessive punishment. In the aftermath of war, he became very active in international causes, setting up the 'Fight the Famine Council' which had as its secondary objective the establishment of a League of Nations. The organisation was non-partisan but several trade unions and senior members of the Labour Party took part. When the National Church Assembly was established in 1920 to govern the Church of England, Parmoor was elected to the House of Laity and became its first Chairman.
Labour Party
Parmoor approved of the statement on peace in the Labour Party's 1923 election manifesto. After the election, with a Labour government in prospect, he received a letter from Ramsay Macdonald inviting him to join it. Parmoor wrote that he "should rejoice in the formation of a Labour Government under your leadership". He was made Lord President of the Council and joint Leader of the House of Lords with Viscount Haldane, with the difficult job of piloting government legislation through a House in which it had minimal support. Although the government lost practically every vote, Parmoor was able to persuade the opposition that they would lose support by wrecking the whole legislative programme. Macdonald, who was serving as his own Foreign Secretary, also chose Parmoor as British representative to the Council of the League of Nations, and to its Assembly in September 1924.
...
After the end of the Labour government, Parmoor remained active in the House of Lords, and when Haldane died in 1928, was elected Leader of the Labour Peers. He served again as Lord President of the Council with special responsibility for League of Nations affairs in the second Labour government of 1929 - 1931, despite his advanced age.
...
Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron
Parmoor considered that ...
elv.no.wikimiki.org, 3 May 2008 [cached]
Parmoor considered that his elevation to the peerage in a semi-judicial role had removed any previous political affiliations.The war had a profound effect on Parmoor's political views, as he considered the decision to go to war a disaster.He opposed conscription and sympathised with Conscientious objectors, whom he thought were subject to excessive punishment.In the aftermath of war, he became very active in international causes, setting up the 'Fight the Famine Council' which had as its secondary objective the establishment of a League of Nations.The organisation was non-partisan but several trade unions and senior members of the Labour Party took part.When the National Church Assembly was established in 1920 to govern the Church of England, Parmoor was elected to the House of Laity and became its first Chairman.
Labour Party
Parmoor approved of the statement on peace in the Labour Party's 1923 election manifesto.After the election, with a Labour government in prospect, he received a letter from Ramsay Macdonald inviting him to join it.Parmoor wrote that he "should rejoice in the formation of a Labour Government under your leadership".He was made Lord President of the Council and joint Leader of the House of Lords with Viscount Haldane, with the difficult job of piloting government legislation through a House in which it had minimal support.Although the government lost practically every vote, Parmoor was able to persuade the opposition that they would lose support by wrecking the whole legislative programme.Macdonald, who was serving as his own Foreign Secretary, also chose Parmoor as British representative to the Council of the League of Nations, and to its Assembly in September 1924.
...
After the end of the Labour government, Parmoor remained active in the House of Lords, and when Haldane died in 1928, was elected Leader of the Labour Peers.He served again as Lord President of the Council with special responsibility for League of Nations affairs in the second Labour government of 1929 - 1931, despite his advanced age.
...
Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron Parmoor, Charles Cripps, 1st Baron
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