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2015-04-15T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Aubrey Layne?

Mr. Aubrey Layne L. Jr.

Senior Attorney

Southern Environmental Law Center Inc

HQ Phone: (434) 977-4090

Southern Environmental Law Center Inc

Southern Environmental Law Center 201 West Main Street, Suite 14

Charlottesville, Virginia 22902

United States

Company Description

The Southern Environmental Law Center is a regional nonprofit using the power of the law to protect the health and environment of the Southeast (Virginia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama). Founded in 1986, SELC's team of nearly 6 ... more

Find other employees at this company (142)

Background Information

Employment History

Position In Great Atlantic Management
Neptune Festival

Prospective Graduate Student
Regent University

President and Principal Broker
Great Atlantic Management Company, Inc.

Certified Public Accountant
KPMG LLP

Affiliations

Board Member
Commonwealth Transportation

Secretary of Transportation
Virginia Department of Transportation

Members
Achievable Dream Academy

Founder
Right

Member
The CTB

Education

B.S.
Accounting
The University of Richmond

B.S.
Accounting
University of Richmond

MBA
International Business
Old Dominion University

Web References (195 Total References)


Transportation Secretary Aubrey ...

www.dailypress.com, $reference.date [cached]

Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne announced termination of contract with 460 contractor State will seek money back from contractor paid on delayed, unpermitted project State, 460 contractor at odds over how much money the state should get back.

Virginia has canceled its contract with the consortium that was supposed to build the proposed U.S. Route 460 improvements and is fighting to reclaim a chunk of the nearly $290 million already paid to the contractor without an inch of road being paved.
Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne announced the move Wednesday at the Commonwealth Transportation Board's meeting in Norfolk, leaving the project's future in question.
Layne wouldn't say how much the state wants back from contractor 460 Mobility Partners, only that "the state's position is that we are owed a great deal of money back."
...
"A payment schedule is not a money-earned schedule," Layne said. He said the state believes U.S. 460 Mobility Partners didn't do some of the things that would have been expected under the contract and essentially had been paid without earning the money simply based on the payment schedule.
...
Layne wouldn't discuss the disparity between what the state wants back and what the contractor thinks it was entitled to.
"Unfortunately, we have reached the point where it's no longer in the state's best interest to negotiate with the current contractor," Layne said. "We're too far apart in what we believe the state is owed."
He said the contract termination is followed by a 60-day period during which the two sides will try to work something out, but didn't rule out the possibility of litigation if a deal doesn't materialize. Bonds issued to fund the project will be paid in full, Layne said.
...
Layne said VDOT will continue with the planning and permitting process for the 17-mile hybrid plan. Once that permit is in place, however, Layne said the project will have to be scored under recently passed legislation that gives the Commonwealth Transportation Board a guideline to determine how to prioritize the funding of major infrastructure projects.
"We do believe in the purpose and need of the project and that's why we're continuing on," Layne said. "But we also believe it should go through House Bill 2 when we know exactly where the road goes."
In other words, the project hasn't been canceled, but may or may not go ahead depending on where the CTB ranks the project.
Layne confirmed that a return to the original plan was out of the question because of the extensive impact on wetlands. He also said if the project was approved it would go through another design-build procurement process. Any previously allocated money not spent on the project would revert to the general fund for roads spending, Layne said.
Trip Pollard, a senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center who has followed the 460 project and testified at a CTB meeting in February on the new route, said he's glad to hear the old contract is off the table and that the 17-mile hybrid proposal will face additional scrutiny.
"Our concern was it was becoming the tail wagging the dog. They were trying to make the new proposal fit the contract so they could work out some kind of deal with U.S. 460 Mobility Partners," he said.
The 17-mile plan won't address some of the more serious flooding concerns along the existing Route 460, Pollard said. He said he hopes that since the project would have to go through another procurement process that many outstanding questions will be answered about the needs the project addresses.


Virginia Transportation Secretary ...

www.vagazette.com, $reference.date [cached]

Virginia Transportation Secretary Aubrey Layne announced the move Wednesday at the Commonwealth Transportation Board's meeting in Norfolk, leaving the project's future in question.

...
Layne wouldn't say how much the state wants back from contractor 460 Mobility Partners, only that "the state's position is that we are owed a great deal of money back."
...
"A payment schedule is not a money-earned schedule," Layne said. He said the state believes U.S. 460 Mobility Partners didn't do some of the things that would have been expected under the contract and essentially had been paid without earning the money simply based on the payment schedule.
...
Layne wouldn't discuss the disparity between what the state wants back and what the contractor thinks it was entitled to.
"Unfortunately, we have reached the point where it's no longer in the state's best interest to negotiate with the current contractor," Layne said. "We're too far apart in what we believe the state is owed."
He said the contract termination is followed by a 60-day period during which the two sides will try to work something out, but didn't rule out the possibility of litigation if a deal doesn't materialize. Bonds issued to fund the project will be paid in full, Layne said.
In January, VDOT announced what it called the "Least Environmentally Damaging Practicable Alternative" - a dramatically scaled-back 17-mile-long hybrid plan between Suffolk and Zuni. The new route moved a bypass around the town of Windsor from the wetland-heavy south to north of the town. It's a plan the state believes the Corps of Engineers will approve once the fine details are ironed out.
Layne said VDOT will continue with the planning and permitting process for the 17-mile hybrid plan. Once that permit is in place, however, Layne said the project will have to be scored under recently passed legislation that gives the Commonwealth Transportation Board a guideline to determine how to prioritize the funding of major infrastructure projects.
"We do believe in the purpose and need of the project and that's why we're continuing on," Layne said. "But we also believe it should go through House Bill 2 when we know exactly where the road goes."
In other words, the project hasn't been canceled, but may or may not go ahead depending on where the CTB ranks the project.
Layne confirmed that a return to the original plan was out of the question because of the extensive impact on wetlands. He also said if the project was approved it would go through another design-build procurement process. Any previously allocated money not spent on the project would revert to the general fund for roads spending, Layne said.
Trip Pollard, a senior attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center who has followed the 460 project and testified at a CTB meeting in February on the new route, said he's glad to hear the old contract is off the table and that the 17-mile hybrid proposal will face additional scrutiny.
"Our concern was it was becoming the tail wagging the dog. They were trying to make the new proposal fit the contract so they could work out some kind of deal with U.S. 460 Mobility Partners," he said.
The 17-mile plan won't address some of the more serious flooding concerns along the existing Route 460, Pollard said. He said he hopes that since the project would have to go through another procurement process that many outstanding questions will be answered about the needs the project addresses.


Secretary of Transportation Aubrey ...

schrisjones.com, $reference.date [cached]

Secretary of Transportation Aubrey L. Layne Jr. said the administration has pledged to relinquish its federal option to place tolls on existing interstates, as Gov.

...
Layne said the administration supported the original legislation, even though it would diminish current state tolling authority, so the public "understands what can be tolled, what can't be tolled, and under what conditions."
The bill, as adopted by the House and included in the budget, would prohibit tolling of existing highways without General Assembly approval except in certain cases, such as converting high-occupancy vehicle lanes to toll lanes on I-66 in Northern Virginia and I-64 in Hampton Roads, as well as highways that opened with tolls, such as Pocahontas Parkway in the Richmond area.
It would specifically prohibit tolling of I-95 south of Fredericksburg or I-81, as proposed more than a decade ago.
But Jones and Layne strongly opposed an attempt by DeSteph and other committee members to change the bill to require all transportation projects involving tolls to be approved by the legislature.


Secretary of Transportation Aubrey ...

schrisjones.com, $reference.date [cached]

Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne said that plan would've essentially killed any public-private partnerships since concessionaires would not want to work on a project for months only to have to clear the hurdle of 140 legislators, too.


Secretary of Transportation Aubrey ...

schrisjones.com, $reference.date [cached]

Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne said he thinks giving the legislature control is a smart move.

"If this bill doesn't pass, that's fine, we still have authority," Layne said. "(The bill) would limit our power, and is the right thing to do.
"It won't impact any of what we do, but the next guy, we don't want a repeat of what could happen (with the Midtown-Downtown deal)."
Layne said the bill has drawn political ire with some senators seeing it as creating tolls one way or another. But he said that's not true - that the bill restricts tolling and gives the legislature oversight.

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