Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 2/12/2015 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Art Aaron?

Art Aaron

Pilot

Northwest Airlines/Delta

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Northwest Airlines/Delta

Web References(1 Total References)


Arthur Aaron

armouryofww2.homestead.com [cached]

Arthur AaronArthur AaronArthur AaronActing Flight Sergeant Arthur Aaron was captain of a Short Stirling III of No 218 ( Gold Coast ) Squadron which took off from Downham Market in Norfolk to take part in a raid on Turin in Northern Italy on the night of 12 August 1943.After a very long flight over occupied Europe and the Alps , the Stirling had started its approach to the target when it was found and attacked by an enemy night fighter.The bravery displayed by Aaron during and after this attack led to the award of the Victoria Cross.Three of the Stirling's engines were hit , the windscreen shot away and the front and rear turrets put out of action.The elevator control was damaged , causing the huge bomber to become unstable and difficult to control.Bullets raked the aircraft , killing the navigator and wounding other crew members.A bullet hit Aaron in the face , breaking his jaw and tearing his flesh.A second bullet struck him in the lung.With his right arm rendered useless , Aaron fell against the control column causing the aircraft to dive several thousand feet.The flight engineer managed to regain control at an altitude of about 900 m ( 3 , 000 ft ).Unable to speak , Aaron indicated to the bomb-aimer to take control of the aircraft.A southerly course was then selected in an endeavour to fly the crippled bomber , with one useless engine and a 4 , 000 lb bomb which could not be jettisoned , to Sicily or North Africa.Flight Sergeant Aaron was carried to the rear of the aircraft , where he was treated with morphine.After resting for some time , he insisted on returning to the cockpit.He was lifted into the pilot's seat and had his feet placed on the rudder bar.He twice attempted to regain control of the aircraft , but his physical strength could not match his determination and he was , with difficulty , persuaded to give up the attempt.Though exhausted and in great pain , Aaron continued to assist the crew , writing instructions with his left.Five hours after leaving the target the Stirling began to run out of fuel.The flare path at Bône airfield in Algeria was soon sighted , however , and Flight Sergeant Aaron summoned his failing strength to direct the bomb-aimer in the hazardous task of landing the damaged aircraft.The airfield was in darkness and the Stirling's undercarriage could not be lowered ; nevertheless , four attempts were made under Aaron's direction.At the fifth attempt his remaining strength deserted him and the landing was safely completed by the bomb-aimer.Aaron was not to live to see his gallantry recognized.Had he been content to lie still and conserve his failing strength , he might well have recovered.Instead , he fulfilled his duty to ensure that his aircraft and crew did not fall into enemy hands and paid the ultimate price.The citation which appeared posthumously in the London Gazette paid tribute thus : 'In appalling conditions he showed the greatest qualities of courage , determination and leadership , and , though wounded and dying , he set an example of devotion to duty which has seldom been equalled and never surpassed.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory