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Wrong Arnold Diethelm?

Arnold Gil Diethelm

Kidney Transplant Surgeon

University of Alabama

HQ Phone:  (205) 934-0100

Email: a***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

University of Alabama

150 Hill University Center 1400 University Boulevard

Birmingham, Alabama,35294

United States

Company Description

Known for its innovative and interdisciplinary approach to education at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, the University of Alabama at Birmingham is the state of Alabama's largest employer and an internationally renowned research university and acade...more

Web References(23 Total References)


United Network for Organ Sharing: Organ Donation and Transplantation

www.unos.org [cached]

Arnold G. Diethelm, M.D. -- liver recipient and professor emeritus of surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham


MedITAC

www.meditac.com [cached]

Arnold Diethelm, M.D.
Professor and Chairman Department of Surgery University of Alabama, Birmingham YALE RESIDENT GRAND ROUNDS 97-98


asts.org

Arnold "Gil" Diethelm, MD
Arnold "Gil" Diethelm, MD Dr. Diethelm ASTS - American Society of Transplant Surgeons/ Arnold "Gil" Diethelm, MD Arnold "Gil" Diethelm, MD served as the 18th President of the ASTS. He graduated from Cornell Medical College in 1958 and following a general surgery residency completed a fellowship at the Harvard Medical School. In 1967, Dr. Diethelm moved to Birmingham, Alabama where he initiated clinical transplantation activities and performed the first successful kidney transplant in the State of Alabama. Dr. Diethelm led many transplant efforts in the Southeast, embracing early efforts at organ sharing, and he continues to work actively in the organ procurement organization serving the citizens of Alabama. A transplant recipient himself, Dr. Diethelm received a new liver at the age of 70 and adds the perspective of being a transplant patient to his great leadership accomplishments in organ transplantation. Transcript: Arnold Diethelm: I'm Dr. Gil Diethelm from the University of Alabama, a kidney transplant surgeon since 1967. Steve Bynon: Arnold Diethelm, can you tell us what interested you first in transplants surgery? Arnold Diethelm: In 1962, I saw the first of several kidney transplant procedures done at the New York Hospital. Arnold Diethelm: Well transplant fellows in 1965 to 1967 were really research people. Arnold Diethelm: Well the most memorable experience was just before I was a fellow. Arnold Diethelm: First I thought I better learn something about it and second I wanted to become a good one, or try to become a good one. Arnold Diethelm: Well the first several transplants in Alabama were an interesting experience. Arnold Diethelm: Well it provided food for thirty-four years and then I developed the end-stages of hepatitis C, I guess in 1999. Arnold Diethelm: Yeah, I guess it was about 1972 or '73 that I heard the Society was going to be formed and I thought it was a very good idea. Arnold Diethelm: Well I think there have been two major advances in transplantation since 1967. Arnold Diethelm: I think the American Transplant Society is first formed a program for discussion. Arnold Diethelm: No. There have been four or five major fields of surgical advance since 1950. Arnold Diethelm: Well any advice I give them would not be very good and I think that the field of transplantation is caught in a quagmire. Arnold Diethelm: I think the most important thing is to have a very good program every year or twice a year and address complicated questions and try to stimulate the younger people to think about it. Arnold Diethelm: I think since I was a young person in those days, I really didn't know the people personally but I knew of them and I listened to them at the meeting. Arnold Diethelm: Well the early days began in May of 1968 when we did the first living related donor transplant and we followed that with two cadavers and two more living relateds. Arnold Diethelm: Well I think the United Organ Sharing Program really was essential. Arnold Diethelm: Well our kidney transplant program grew over a period of twenty to twenty-five years to one of the busiest in the country. Arnold Diethelm: The word "thank you.


wwww.asts.org

Dr. Diethelm
Dr. Diethelm But I was always appreciative of the families that would say thank you. . - Arnold Diethelm, MD Biography: Up | Down Arnold "Gil" Diethelm, MD served as the 18th President of the ASTS. He graduated from Cornell Medical College in 1958 and following a general surgery residency completed a fellowship at the Harvard Medical School. In 1967, Dr. Diethelm moved to Birmingham, Alabama where he initiated clinical transplantation activities and performed the first successful kidney transplant in the State of Alabama. Dr. Diethelm led many transplant efforts in the Southeast, embracing early efforts at organ sharing, and he continues to work actively in the organ procurement organization serving the citizens of Alabama. A transplant recipient himself, Dr. Diethelm received a new liver at the age of 70 and adds the perspective of being a transplant patient to his great leadership accomplishments in organ transplantation. Transcript: Up | Down Arnold Diethelm: I'm Dr. Gil Diethelm from the University of Alabama, a kidney transplant surgeon since 1967. Steve Bynon: Arnold Diethelm, can you tell us what interested you first in transplants surgery? Arnold Diethelm: In 1962, I saw the first of several kidney transplant procedures done at the New York Hospital. Arnold Diethelm: Well transplant fellows in 1965 to 1967 were really research people. Arnold Diethelm: Well the most memorable experience was just before I was a fellow. Arnold Diethelm: First I thought I better learn something about it and second I wanted to become a good one, or try to become a good one. Arnold Diethelm: Well the first several transplants in Alabama were an interesting experience. Arnold Diethelm: Well it provided food for thirty-four years and then I developed the end-stages of hepatitis C, I guess in 1999. Arnold Diethelm: Yeah, I guess it was about 1972 or '73 that I heard the Society was going to be formed and I thought it was a very good idea. Arnold Diethelm: Well I think there have been two major advances in transplantation since 1967. Arnold Diethelm: I think the American Transplant Society is first formed a program for discussion. Arnold Diethelm: No. There have been four or five major fields of surgical advance since 1950. Arnold Diethelm: Well any advice I give them would not be very good and I think that the field of transplantation is caught in a quagmire. Arnold Diethelm: I think the most important thing is to have a very good program every year or twice a year and address complicated questions and try to stimulate the younger people to think about it. Arnold Diethelm: I think since I was a young person in those days, I really didn't know the people personally but I knew of them and I listened to them at the meeting. Arnold Diethelm: Well the early days began in May of 1968 when we did the first living related donor transplant and we followed that with two cadavers and two more living relateds. Arnold Diethelm: Well I think the United Organ Sharing Program really was essential. Arnold Diethelm: Well our kidney transplant program grew over a period of twenty to twenty-five years to one of the busiest in the country. Arnold Diethelm: The word "thank you.


A. G. Diethlem: Alabama's Transplantation Pioneer

www.uabhealth.org [cached]

Dr. Diethelm
A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Arnold G. Diethelm, MD, graduated from Washington State University and received his MD degree from Cornell Medical College, with surgical training at The New York Hospital. Before coming to UAB, he completed a 2-year fellowship at Harvard with Nobel Prize Laureate Joseph E. Murray, MD, who performed the first human kidney transplant (1954). Dr. Diethelm is the author or coauthor of more than 210 publications in peer-reviewed journals, a member of 26 surgical societies, chair of UAB’s Department of Surgery for 18 years (1982-1999), and the recipient of numerous awards, honorary degrees, visiting professorships, and appointments. Dr. Diethelm arrived at UAB in 1967 and was given a portfolio to establish a renal transplant program. Dr. Murray thought the time was right for the new program and recomended Dr. Diethelm, who faced questions over his choice of subspecialty as well as his decision to relocate in Alabama. Dr. Diethelm: Two people made it a success, John Kirklin and Joe Volker. Dr. Diethelm: I didn’t know how to put together a program. Dr. Diethelm: All the early transplants were performed at the Veterans Affairs Hospital because, at the time, University Hospital didn’t have enough clinical space â€" beds, operating rooms, or ICU beds. Dr. Diethelm: People were not out protesting the program; rather, they seemed apathetic about it. But it did gain speed. What paid great dividends over the years was that eventually almost every community had a transplant recipient. We would send a little notice to the recipient’s home-town newspaper saying the patient had been released from the hospital after receiving a kidney transplant, and that was good advertising for us. Synopsis: What enabled the program to grow so large? Dr. Diethelm: All kidney failure patients were on dialysis, of course, and under the care of a nephrologist. Dr. Diethelm: Again, that came from watching John Kirklin. Dr. Diethelm: Perhaps the greatest surprise has been the development of tolerable and effective immunosuppression. Dr. Diethelm: I had visited Tom Starzl’s [liver transplant] program in Pittsburgh and was terribly impressed with the patients who had received cyclosporine. Dr. Diethelm: Limb transplantation is an area that should be pursued because it has a role, especially in children.


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