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Wrong April Moore?

April Moore

Ecologist

R9, Allegheny NF, SO

Direct Phone: (814) ***-****direct phone

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

R9, Allegheny NF, SO

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Background Information

Employment History

Recreation Specialist

Bradford


Public Outreach Educator and Ecologist

Forest Service Agency


Web References(12 Total References)


www.timesobserver.com

ANF Ecologist April Moore had students pull garlic mustard plants, an invasive species.
Moore explained that garlic mustard had been brought to the United States by Europeans. The edible plant has a garlic flavor and was used in cooking and medicine, she said. It is a source of vitamins A and C and was valuable for those on long journeys at sea. Moore and teachers had to discourage students from eating the plants.


www.timesobserver.com

That is why we are active participants in this project," said April Moore, ecologist for the U.S.Forest Service."We are then going to plant new native grasses and ferns such as blue cardinal flowers, cinnamon fern, lady fern and lobelia," said Moore."They are becoming dormant now because of the winter season coming, but they will be good for the spring."Moore said that these types of plants have advantages because are adapted to the local climate, soil conditions and require little or no maintenance."I just really appreciate everyone who came out today," said Moore."It is a great time to spend helping out the area as well as spending time with other fellow environmental enthusiasts."The next volunteer day will be held in April on Earth Day to pull garlic mustard plants, which inhibit the growth of other plants.Subscribe to The Times Observer


www.westfieldrepublican.com

That is why we are active participants in this project," said April Moore, ecologist for the U.S.Forest Service."Today we are digging up old soil, which currently isn't very deep and removing non-native species or invasive species that harm the plants that are trying to grow here."Invasive plant species, such as ragweed and purple loosestrife, are defined as a plant that is not native and has negative effects on the economy, environment or human health.The term "invasive" is known for the most aggressive plant species that grow and reproduce rapidly, causing significant changes to the areas in which they become established."We are then going to plant new native grasses and ferns such as blue cardinal flowers, cinnamon fern, lady fern and lobelia," said Moore."They are becoming dormant now because of the winter season coming, but they will be good for the spring."Moore said that these types of plants have advantages because are adapted to the local climate, soil conditions and require little or no maintenance."I just really appreciate everyone who came out today," said Moore."It is a great time to spend helping out the area as well as spending time with other fellow environmental enthusiasts."The next volunteer day will be held in April on Earth Day to pull garlic mustard plants, which inhibit the growth of other plants. Subscribe to Westfield Republican


www.alleghenyoutdoorclub.org

Also participating from the FS was Tonika Goins-Heath, recreation specialist at Bradford, April Moore, forest ecologist, and the ever-favorites Smokey Bear and Woodsey Owl.


www.alleghenyoutdoorclub.org

Also participating from the FS was Tonika Goins-Heath, recreation specialist at Bradford, April Moore, forest ecologist, and the ever-favorites Smokey Bear and Woodsey Owl.


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