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2016-07-26T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Anna Richards?

Dr. Anna Richards

Research Scientist

CSIRO

Direct Phone: +61 * **** ****       

Email: a***@***.au

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CSIRO

Clunies Ross Street

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601

Australia

Company Description

About CSIRO: Australia is founding its future on science and innovation. Its national science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is a powerhouse of ideas, technologies and skills for building prosperity, growt ... more

Find other employees at this company (7,924)

Background Information

Employment History

Owner

Fresh Science SA

Director

Beckman's Handcrafted

Director of Marketing, High Point

Merchandise Mart Properties Inc

Affiliations

Team Member
Renea Myers Marketing

Education

PhD

University of Queensland

Web References (18 Total References)


Stories

freshscience.org.au [cached]

Anna Richards, CSIRO


Fresh Science

www.scienceinpublic.com.au [cached]

Soil has the answer to burning climate questions Decreasing the frequency of wild fires in northern Australia would lead to an increase in the amount of carbon stored in the soil, significantly lowering greenhouse gas emissions, according to CSIRO ecologist, Dr Anna Richards. Read the full article ?

...
Anna Richards, a postdoctoral fellow at CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences who is looking at the relationship between fire management and climate change


Fresh Science

freshscience.org.au [cached]

Decreasing the frequency of wild fires in northern Australia would lead to an increase in the amount of carbon stored in the soil, significantly lowering greenhouse gas emissions, according to CSIRO ecologist, Dr Anna Richards.

...
While fire is important for maintaining a healthy environment in northern Australia, Anna says, scientists have become concerned at the increase in frequency and intensity of wild fires over the past century. “About half the Top End is burnt each year and this is changing the environment as well as releasing large quantities of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.â€
Until now, it was assumed that it was really only the amount of smoke that contributed to these emissions, but Anna has shown that things are much more complicated than that. There is an interaction with the soil as well.
“The frequency of fires affects the chemistry of the soil and the workings of the plant rootsâ€"hence the capacity of the soil to store carbon, “she says. “In general, the greater the frequency of fires, the more carbon is released from the soil, and vice versa.â€
Using measurements of soil carbon from long-term fire experiments conducted near Darwin and sophisticated computer modelling, Anna found that reducing fire frequency to one fire every four to six years is best for storing carbon. Her work was published recently in the international journal Ecosystems.
As part of the Tiwi Carbon Study with the Tiwi Land Council, Anna Richards works with Indigenous rangers to collect carbon dataâ€. She is pictured here with Tiwi Land Ranger Kim Brooks (photo: Barbara McKaige)
“Until now, scientists have known little about the impact of different fire management options on the amount of carbon stored in soil. These findings are significant for managing carbon in northern Australia, particularly for programs that use indigenous fire management practices to reduce fire frequency and severity,†she said.
Anna is conducting further research on the effects of fire on soil carbon as part of the Tiwi Carbon Study in the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. The Tiwi Carbon Study is a partnership between CSIRO, the Tiwi Land Council, the Tiwi College and Tiwi Forests.
Anna Richards is one of 16 winners of Fresh Science, a national competition for early-career scientists who are unveiling their research to the public for the first time. Her training and challenges have included presenting her discoveries in verse at a Melbourne pub, and to schools in Melbourne and country Victoria.
For interviews, contact Anna Richards on Anna.Richards@csiro.au
...
Fresh Scientist Anna Richards (photo: Mark Coulson)
Close up of soil surface covered in ash and charcoal following a savanna fire, with green re-sprouting shrubs in the background (photo: Anna Richards)
Dr Anna Richards, post-doctoral scientists studying the effect of fire on soil carbon storage, based at CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences in Darwin (photo: Barbara McKaige)
...
As part of the Tiwi Carbon Study with the Tiwi Land Council, Anna Richards works with Indigenous rangers to collect carbon dataâ€.


Decreasing the frequency of wild fires ...

www.sciencealert.com.au [cached]

Decreasing the frequency of wild fires in northern Australia would lead to an increase in the amount of carbon stored in the soil, significantly lowering greenhouse gas emissions, according to CSIRO ecologist, Dr Anna Richards.

...
While fire is important for maintaining a healthy environment in northern Australia, Anna says, scientists have become concerned at the increase in frequency and intensity of wild fires over the past century. "About half the Top End is burnt each year and this is changing the environment as well as releasing large quantities of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere."
Until now, it was assumed that it was really only the amount of smoke that contributed to these emissions, but Anna has shown that things are much more complicated than that. There is an interaction with the soil as well.
"The frequency of fires affects the chemistry of the soil and the workings of the plant roots-hence the capacity of the soil to store carbon, "she says. "In general, the greater the frequency of fires, the more carbon is released from the soil, and vice versa."
Using measurements of soil carbon from long-term fire experiments conducted near Darwin and sophisticated computer modelling, Anna found that reducing fire frequency to one fire every four to six years is best for storing carbon. Her work was published recently in the international journal Ecosystems.
"Until now, scientists have known little about the impact of different fire management options on the amount of carbon stored in soil. These findings are significant for managing carbon in northern Australia, particularly for programs that use indigenous fire management practices to reduce fire frequency and severity," she said.
Anna is conducting further research on the effects of fire on soil carbon as part of the Tiwi Carbon Study in the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. The Tiwi Carbon Study is a partnership between CSIRO, the Tiwi Land Council, the Tiwi College and Tiwi Forests.
Anna Richards is one of 16 winners of Fresh Science, a national competition for early-career scientists who are unveiling their research to the public for the first time. Her training and challenges have included presenting her discoveries in verse at a Melbourne pub, and to schools in Melbourne and country Victoria.


Fire, carbon capture and the NT

freshscience.org.au [cached]

Decreasing the frequency of wild fires in northern Australia would lead to an increase in the amount of carbon stored in the soil, significantly lowering greenhouse gas emissions, according to CSIRO ecologist, Dr Anna Richards.

...
While fire is important for maintaining a healthy environment in northern Australia, Anna says, scientists have become concerned at the increase in frequency and intensity of wild fires over the past century. "About half the Top End is burnt each year and this is changing the environment as well as releasing large quantities of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere."
Until now, it was assumed that it was really only the amount of smoke that contributed to these emissions, but Anna has shown that things are much more complicated than that. There is an interaction with the soil as well.
"The frequency of fires affects the chemistry of the soil and the workings of the plant roots-hence the capacity of the soil to store carbon, "she says. "In general, the greater the frequency of fires, the more carbon is released from the soil, and vice versa."
Using measurements of soil carbon from long-term fire experiments conducted near Darwin and sophisticated computer modelling, Anna found that reducing fire frequency to one fire every four to six years is best for storing carbon. Her work was published recently in the international journal Ecosystems.
As part of the Tiwi Carbon Study with the Tiwi Land Council, Anna Richards works with Indigenous rangers to collect carbon data". She is pictured here with Tiwi Land Ranger Kim Brooks (photo: Barbara McKaige)
"Until now, scientists have known little about the impact of different fire management options on the amount of carbon stored in soil. These findings are significant for managing carbon in northern Australia, particularly for programs that use indigenous fire management practices to reduce fire frequency and severity," she said.
Anna is conducting further research on the effects of fire on soil carbon as part of the Tiwi Carbon Study in the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. The Tiwi Carbon Study is a partnership between CSIRO, the Tiwi Land Council, the Tiwi College and Tiwi Forests.
Anna Richards is one of 16 winners of Fresh Science, a national competition for early-career scientists who are unveiling their research to the public for the first time. Her training and challenges have included presenting her discoveries in verse at a Melbourne pub, and to schools in Melbourne and country Victoria.
For interviews, contact Anna Richards on Anna.Richards@csiro.au
...
Fresh Scientist Anna Richards (photo: Mark Coulson)
Close up of soil surface covered in ash and charcoal following a savanna fire, with green re-sprouting shrubs in the background (photo: Anna Richards)
Dr Anna Richards, post-doctoral scientists studying the effect of fire on soil carbon storage, based at CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences in Darwin (photo: Barbara McKaige)
...
As part of the Tiwi Carbon Study with the Tiwi Land Council, Anna Richards works with Indigenous rangers to collect carbon data".

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