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Wrong Ann Hohenhaus?

Ann E. Hohenhaus

Certified Veterinary Journalist

The Animal Medical Center Inc

HQ Phone:  (212) 838-8100

Direct Phone: (212) ***-****direct phone

Email: a***@***.org

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The Animal Medical Center Inc

510 East 62Nd Street

New York City, New York,10065

United States

Company Description

AMC is a full service animal hospital that cares for dogs and cats. Our wide range of services includes exams, consultations, preventive care, low cost vaccinations, diet recommendations, junior and senior pet wellness care, dental and surgical procedures. Add...more

Background Information

Employment History

ST. BART


Affiliations

Vetstreet Inc

Board Member


California Veterinary Medical Association

Board Member


IDEXX Laboratories Inc

Member of the Pfizer Animal Cancer Experts Panel, the Advisory Board


Education

Bachelor of Science degree , with honors

St. Mary's College of Maryland


DVM


DVM

American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine


Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine

Cornell University


Web References(190 Total References)


What's Going on With My Dog Drooling So Much?

www.vetstreet.com [cached]

"Saliva pools in their cheek pouches, and when they shake their heads, the drool flies," says Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, DVM, DACVIM, a staff veterinarian at the Animal Medical Center in New York City.
And while you can wipe down the dog's face to minimize the mess, there's no way to prevent it - dealing with drool is just part of caring for your pet. When Drooling Could Signal a Heat Emergency In the summertime, sudden drooling may be a sign of heatstroke, says Dr. Hohenhaus. If temperatures are high, and your dog is panting and appears fatigued, get her into the shade or air conditioning immediately, as well as offer her a cool drink of water. "It could be a sign of a neurological condition, in which the nerves in the face don't work, or a blockage in the esophagus caused by something like a bone," says Dr. Hohenhaus, adding that symptoms like gagging and retching should be considered urgent.


Pet Sitting Henderson | Dog Walking NV | Henderson Pet Service

pawminderspluspetsitters.com [cached]

The amount of exercise your pet needs depends on whether it's a cat or dog and for the latter, which breed it is, says Dr. Anne Hohenhaus,DVM, DACVIM, a staff veterinarian with The Animal Medical Center, New York.
Typically, dogs need at least one walk a day, and it's also a good idea to provide some exercise in your home, too. Simple games like throwing a ball or toy (or even throwing it up and down stairs to really get your pooch moving) or using a laser pointer will raise your pet's heart rate and the pounds she sheds. Pay attention to any lumps and bumps on your cat, warns Dr. Hohenhaus. One in four dogs dies of cancer and cancer is the leading form of death in dogs over age two, according to the Morris Animal Foundation. Lumps and bumps almost always get bigger, Dr. Hohenhaus says.


Is tap water safe for your dog? - The Ultimate Leash Blog

theultimateleash.com [cached]

In most cases, yes, says Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, a staff veterinarian at the Animal Medical Center in New York City.
But if the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, is any indication, not all tap water is safe. "If you wouldn't drink this water, you shouldn't give this to your dogs," says Hohenhaus.


Onions/Garlic=Bad for your Dog - The Ultimate Leash Blog

theultimateleash.com [cached]

"Any member of the Allium family-onions, garlic, leeks, and chives are the most common reported to cause toxicity-contains N-propyl disulfide," says Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, staff doctor at NYC's Animal Medical Center.
"Consumption of as little as 15 to 30 g/kg in dogs has resulted in clinically important hematologic changes," says Hohenhaus. Try to avoid exposure of onions and garlic in any form to best prevent your dog from becoming ill. "Don't serve food from your plate containing onions or garlic and don't serve prepared human foods without checking the label," says Hohenhaus.


Does Your Pet Need Sunscreen?, News from VetLocator.com

www.vetlocator.com [cached]

According to Dr. Ann Hohenhaus, chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Animal Medical Center of New York, there are many pets that should use sunscreen.
"For pets who are shaved, that shaved area is at risk of being burned," Hohenhaus said. Zinc oxide should never be used because dogs can become dangerously anemic if it is ingested, Hohenhaus warns. But while you should protect your dog or cat's sensitive areas, it does not need additional coverage over its hair. "We humans go out and bake all day, but animals are wearing their own hat. It's really these couple of spots that are a problem," Hohenhaus said. "Second thing is dogs with flat faces like bulldogs, pugs, or boxers, because they have less of a nose, and their wind pipe in narrower, they're more prone to overheating," Hohenhaus said. Even a small stop can turn into a dangerous amount of time," Hohenhaus said. Just as children should never be left alone in a car, pets should also not be left alone, especially in the heat. "The signs (of heat stroke) are sudden and catastrophic," she warns. "They include panting, collapse and seizures. You can tell if your dog lies on its side and its panting and panting and its gums and tongue are redder than usual. But prevention is really very important, and in general, it is a preventable disease." Hohenhaus said you do not have to break the bank on air-conditioning to keep man's best friend safe and comfortable. During the day, she recommends leaving the blinds down and maybe one fan on for the dog to lie near.


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