Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 5/21/2016 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Ango Abdullahi?

Ango Abdullahi

Spokesman

The Northern Union

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

The Northern Union

United Kingdom

Company Description

We are The Northern Union. We're a small multi discipline creative studio based in Sunderland. And we're committed to providing creative excellence to our clients. Our disciplines include: Promotional literature, brand development, corporate identities, ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Adviser To the President

Nigeria


Mr. President

Center for International Private Enterprise Inc


Vice Chancellor

Ahmadu Bello University


Special Advisor To the President On Food Security

World Agricultural Forum


Affiliations

NEF

Secretary


Education

Barewa College


Nigerian College


B.Sc.

Agriculture


M.Sc.

Agronomy


Ph.D.

agronomy

Amuatubelo University


Ph.D.

agronomy

Kansas State University


Web References(111 Total References)


Ndi Igbo, Leadership, Nationhood, The Nigerian Dilemma And Why We Are All Biafrans - Swift Reporters

swiftreporters.com [cached]

Only recently, a former Minister of Education, former Vice-Chancellor of the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, and member of the Northern Elders Forum (NEF), Prof. Ango Abdullahi, was reported by the Punch newspaper (August 31, 2016) as saying, "If Nigerians have found it difficult to live together in peace, the component units should find it convenient to go their separate ways," adding that if the amalgamation of the country in 1914 by Lord Lugard was a mistake, "each region should go separately".
How convenient! We can see and feel the sarcasm dripping from Prof. Abdullahi's posers. I am sure the learned professor knows that Nigerians going "their separate ways" is not going to happen, at least not the way he has posed the question. Not because there are no Nigerians who want "each region" to go "their separate ways", but because there are those who still think it is their prerogative to determine what shape or form that "separation" should take if and when it does happen. I think the question Prof Abdullahi should have posed is, why have Nigerians found it difficult to live in peace? He agrees that Nigeria's unity is negotiable which is comforting but his idea why we should have the negotiation debate is quite troubling. Let's hear him: "Yes we accepted Boko Haram for those who described them as 'Islamist terrorists', fair enough; but what about economic terrorists? In the Niger Delta, for example, people who came out openly and said they're avenging something and that they're fighting to avenge something, they're worse than what's happening in this country; they're worse than Boko Haram. If you're not going to fight Avengers, then stop fighting Boko Haram." Of course, there is no denying-in Prof. Abdullahi's world-the fact that "economic terrorists" are far worse than "Islamist terrorists". But I would say terrorists are terrorists, whether "economic", "Islamist", "Christian", "Buddhist", or "animist". For me, crime is crime no matter the colouration, except that in Nigeria's Niger Delta, there is also a clear evidence of criminal appropriation and neglect by the Nigerian state. So, how should the citizens of the Niger Delta respond to such blatant injustice? My understanding is that the militants of the Niger Delta are asking for a greater control of the resources-and we can't use the argument of how well they have managed what they get currently to deny them control-in the area and therefore a greater control of their environment. This position is tenable considering Prof Abdullahi's argument as reported in Thisday newspaper (August 31, 2016) that the "ragtag boys" who were fed up with the things happening to them became members of Boko Haram.


Ndi Igbo, Leadership, Nationhood, the Nigerian Dilemma and Why We Are All Biafrans | Chidoonumah.com

www.chidoonumah.com [cached]

Only recently, a former Minister of Education, former Vice-Chancellor of the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, and member of the Northern Elders Forum (NEF), Prof. Ango Abdullahi, was reported by the Punch newspaper (August 31, 2016) as saying, "If Nigerians have found it difficult to live together in peace, the component units should find it convenient to go their separate ways," adding that if the amalgamation of the country in 1914 by Lord Lugard was a mistake, "each region should go separately".
How convenient! We can see and feel the sarcasm dripping from Prof. Abdullahi's posers. I am sure the learned professor knows that Nigerians going "their separate ways" is not going to happen, at least not the way he has posed the question. Not because there are no Nigerians who want "each region" to go "their separate ways", but because there are those who still think it is their prerogative to determine what shape or form that "separation" should take if and when it does happen. I think the question Prof Abdullahi should have posed is, why have Nigerians found it difficult to live in peace? He agrees that Nigeria's unity is negotiable which is comforting but his idea why we should have the negotiation debate is quite troubling. Let's hear him: "Yes we accepted Boko Haram for those who described them as 'Islamist terrorists', fair enough; but what about economic terrorists? In the Niger Delta, for example, people who came out openly and said they're avenging something and that they're fighting to avenge something, they're worse than what's happening in this country; they're worse than Boko Haram. If you're not going to fight Avengers, then stop fighting Boko Haram." Of course, there is no denying-in Prof. Abdullahi's world-the fact that "economic terrorists" are far worse than "Islamist terrorists". But I would say terrorists are terrorists, whether "economic", "Islamist", "Christian", "Buddhist", or "animist". For me, crime is crime no matter the colouration, except that in Nigeria's Niger Delta, there is also a clear evidence of criminal appropriation and neglect by the Nigerian state. So, how should the citizens of the Niger Delta respond to such blatant injustice? My understanding is that the militants of the Niger Delta are asking for a greater control of the resources-and we can't use the argument of how well they have managed what they get currently to deny them control-in the area and therefore a greater control of their environment. This position is tenable considering Prof Abdullahi's argument as reported in Thisday newspaper (August 31, 2016) that the "ragtag boys" who were fed up with the things happening to them became members of Boko Haram.


Naija News - WHY SECURITY ADVISED AGAINST ARREST OF NORTHERN YOUTHS

naija.com [cached]

The Northern youth organisations had enjoyed the backing of the spokesman of Northern Elders Forum and former vice chancellor of Ahmadu Bello University, Prof. Ango Abdullahi, who also lashed out at Northern governors for disowning the youths.
Abdullahi, who addressed reporters in Zaria, said he saw nothing bad with the quit notice issued by the Northern youths to Igbo people residing in the North because the Igbo were busy calling for the Sovereign State of Biafra and from all indications, their leaders, including governors, were behind them.


News | Citizen Confidential | Page 6

www.citizenconfidential.com [cached]

Speaking in an interview with Saturday Sun, a former Vice Chancellor, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria and member of Northern Elders Forum, Professor Ango Abdullahi, felt sorry about the devel... Read more


How to deal with Biafra - Prof. Ango Abdullahi - All News Nigeria

allnewsnigeria.com [cached]

Home›biafra›How to deal with Biafra - Prof. Ango Abdullahi
How to deal with Biafra - Prof. Ango Abdullahi Prof Ango Abdullahi, a former Vice Chancellor of Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria, is the spokesperson for the Northern Elders Forum (NEF). In this interview, Abdullahi speaks on the two years of President Muhammadu Buhari's administration and the agitation by some Igbo elements for the Biafra state, among other issues of national importance. Prof. Ango Abdullahi The post How to deal with Biafra - Prof. Ango Abdullahi appeared first on Vanguard News.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory