logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 10/2/2010 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Andy Tweed?

Andy Tweed

Maintenance Officer

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

HQ Phone:  (615) 781-6500

Email: a***@***.gov

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency

440 Hogan Rd.

Nashville, Tennessee,37220

United States

Company Description

TWRA manages trout fisheries in the tailwaters of five hydropower dams operated by TVA in Region IV.  Cold water released from the reservoirs impounded by these dams extirpated fish populations that formerly occurred downstream.  Therefore, TWRA and the U.S. F...more

Web References(20 Total References)


www.memphisflyer.com

"The majority of the alligators in Shelby County are found, believe it or not, toward downtown," says Andy Tweed, game warden for Tennessee Wildlife Resources.
Alligators have been seen in recent years in the Mississippi, Wolf, and Loosahatchie rivers but are more common in the latter two, according to Tweed. They have also been spotted in McKellar Lake. Tweed thinks the alligator population here will increase significantly. "It'll take another 20 years before they're really prevalent in the West Tennessee area," Tweed says. Tweed says he's spotted a half-dozen alligators in the wild here over the past decade. "They're few and far between, but they are here," Tweed says. Tweed says the coyote, also known as the American jackal, is the most adaptable animal in North America, primarily because it eats anything, including rodents, immature deer, rabbits, turkeys, and occasionally snakes. Not at all, Tweed says. "They don't attack people. They don't like people, because we're about their only predator," he says. They're commonly found in the Wolf River bottoms, on Presidents Island, Ensley Bottoms, the north end of Mud Island, Collierville, Cordova, Shelby Farms, and near the Stonebridge Golf Course in Lakeland, according to Tweed and Adams. "A healthy population of bobcats only means that we have an abundance of rabbits or rodents," Tweed says. Tweed says people should beware of copperheads if they have a woodpile. "That's a good place for a copperhead to make a home," he says. "It's warm in the winter and cool in the summer."


www.sunherald.com

"The flood waters were really tough on whitetail deer, and they're known for being good swimmers," said Andy Tweed, a conservation officer with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.


www.memphisflyer.com

The majority of the alligators in Shelby County are found, believe it or not, toward downtown," says Andy Tweed, game warden for Tennessee Wildlife Resources.
Alligators have been seen in recent years in the Mississippi, Wolf, and Loosahatchie rivers but are more common in the latter two, according to Tweed. They have also been spotted in McKellar Lake. Tweed thinks the alligator population here will increase significantly. "It'll take another 20 years before they're really prevalent in the West Tennessee area," Tweed says. Tweed says he's spotted a half-dozen alligators in the wild here over the past decade. "They're few and far between, but they are here," Tweed says. Tweed says the coyote, also known as the American jackal, is the most adaptable animal in North America, primarily because it eats anything, including rodents, immature deer, rabbits, turkeys, and occasionally snakes. Not at all, Tweed says. "They don't attack people. They don't like people, because we're about their only predator," he says. They're commonly found in the Wolf River bottoms, on Presidents Island, Ensley Bottoms, the north end of Mud Island, Collierville, Cordova, Shelby Farms, and near the Stonebridge Golf Course in Lakeland, according to Tweed and Adams. "A healthy population of bobcats only means that we have an abundance of rabbits or rodents," Tweed says. Tweed says people should beware of copperheads if they have a woodpile. "That's a good place for a copperhead to make a home," he says. "It's warm in the winter and cool in the summer."


www.iseepools.com

"It happens every time we have a big flood," said Andy Tweed, a maintenance officer with the Wildlife Resources Agency, Tennessee.


www.wreg.com

"It's only going to have an inch or two of ice and that's not thick enough to hold us," said Andy Tweed, TN Wildlife Resource Agency.
It's rare that a human falls in frozen water but wildlife officer, Andy Tweed says it he has seen it with deer and other animals. He cautions people to steer clear because lakes and ponds in the Mid-South don't freeze hard enough. "The temperatures have not been cold enough to freeze the ice thick enough to hold somebody's weight like it does in Minnesota, Wisconsin and states like that," said Tweed.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory