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Wrong Andrew Redd?

Andrew D. Redd

Staff Scientist

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

HQ Phone:  (301) 496-5717

Direct Phone: (410) ***-****direct phone

Email: r***@***.gov

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Room 4089 6610 Rockledge Drive, MSC 6603

Bethesda, Maryland,20892

United States

Company Description

About the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) NIAID conducts and supports research - at the National Institutes of Health, throughout the United States, and worldwide - to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases,...more

Background Information

Employment History

Instructor

Johns Hopkins University


Affiliations

National Institutes of Health

Staff Scientist


Education

Ph.D.


Web References(13 Total References)


forums.poz.com

The study, published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, was led by Thomas C. Quinn, M.D., and Andrew D. Redd, Ph.D., of NIAID's Laboratory of Immunoregulation, and Maria J. Wawer, M.D., Ph.D., formerly of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York City, and now with Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore.
"Previous studies of HIV superinfection have focused on individuals exposed to the virus through high-risk sexual activity or intravenous drug use," said lead author Dr. Redd. "Our findings suggest that HIV vaccine strategies designed to recreate the natural immune response to HIV may be insufficient to protect an individual from infection," Dr. Redd noted.


www.positivelypositive.ca

The research was led by Andrew D. Redd, Ph.D., staff scientist, and Thomas C. Quinn, M.D., senior investigator, both in the Laboratory of Immunoregulation of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Dr. Redd and colleagues examined particular genetic sequences of HIV in blood samples collected between 1994 and 2002 from hundreds of HIV-infected heterosexuals participating in the Rakai Community Cohort Study in Rakai District, Uganda. According to Dr. Redd, this finding demonstrates that in the heterosexual transmission of HIV, the frequent natural selection of viral strains from early in the infection of the transmitting partner reduces viral diversity at the population level. Moreover, in four couples, the newly acquired strain was highly similar or identical to specific variants found in the transmitting partner at both the earliest time point and the time of transmission. The scientists hypothesize that these highly transmissible HIV strains from early infection were sustained in the blood at low levels or sequestered in certain cells for transmission at a later time. Related research by other scientists shows that HIV strains found in infected individuals during the early stages of infection have diversified little from the strain that caused infection. Thus, the fact that these early HIV strains somehow are maintained or persist at low levels for transmission later suggests they may have an evolutionary advantage at crossing the genital barrier and causing infection, compared with HIV strains that predominate later in infection, according to Dr. Redd. Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., NIAID director and chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Immunoregulation; and Andrew D. Redd, Ph.D., staff scientist in the NIAID Laboratory of Immunoregulation, are available for comment.


www.whatabouthiv.org

The study, published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, was led by Thomas C. Quinn, M.D., and Andrew D. Redd, Ph.D., of NIAID's Laboratory of Immunoregulation, and Maria J. Wawer, M.D., Ph.D., formerly of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York City, and now with Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore.
"Previous studies of HIV superinfection have focused on individuals exposed to the virus through high-risk sexual activity or intravenous drug use," said lead author Dr. Redd. "Our findings suggest that HIV vaccine strategies designed to recreate the natural immune response to HIV may be insufficient to protect an individual from infection," Dr. Redd noted.


www.ScientificComputing.com

The study, published online in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, was led by Thomas C. Quinn, M.D., and Andrew D. Redd, Ph.D., of NIAIDÂ's Laboratory of Immunoregulation, and Maria J. Wawer, M.D., Ph.D., formerly of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York City, and now with Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore.
"Previous studies of HIV superinfection have focused on individuals exposed to the virus through high-risk sexual activity or intravenous drug use," said lead author Dr. Redd. "Our findings suggest that HIV vaccine strategies designed to recreate the natural immune response to HIV may be insufficient to protect an individual from infection," Dr. Redd noted.


www.voanews.com

Dr. Andrew Redd said there are HIV infections and then there are superinfections.
"A superinfection occurs when an individual is initially infected with a strain or strains of HIV. And then at some point later on - after that person has developed an initial immune response to their first infecting strain - at that later time point they come into contact through risky behavior with a second viral strain and then are superinfected with that second strain," he said. Redd is the lead author of the study and a scientist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He said prior to the research done in Uganda it was thought that superinfections were rare, occurring in intravenous drug users or men who have sex with men. Not so. "What we found in our study was that when we looked at a general population of heterosexual individuals in Uganda we found that it actually isn't as rare as what we thought. And that it is occurring at a significant rate even in the general population," he said. And in Uganda, we have subtype A and subtype D," said Redd. Redd says, though, that standard antiretroviral treatment should be effective against superinfections. "We have no evidence so far and we don't think that HIV superinfection affects the response to treatment. From what we can tell, individuals who get superinfected respond to treatment just fine and it lowers their viral load and they get healthier. One of the things that we're worried about, though, if the possibility that an individual could get superinfected with a viral strain that is already resistant to the antiretroviral drugs and that would be a major problem. But to date that doesn't seem to be a huge risk so far," said Redd. Redd added that current HIV vaccine strategies that try to "recreate the natural immune response may be insufficient to protect an individual from infection."


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