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This profile was last updated on 2/14/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Andrew J. Einstein

Wrong Dr. Andrew J. Einstein?

Board Member

Phone: (202) ***-****  HQ Phone
Association for Clinical and Translational Science
2025 M Street , NW , Suite 800
Washington Dc, District of Columbia 20036
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • MD
  • PhD
141 Total References
Web References
ACTS Leadership - Association for Clinical and Translational Science
www.actscience.org, 14 Feb 2014 [cached]
Andrew J. Einstein, M.D., Ph.D.
The HCM Team at Columbia University Medical Center in New York
www.columbiasurgery.org, 14 Sept 2013 [cached]
Andrew Einstein, MD - a researcher with advanced training and expertise in CT and MRI imaging of the heart.
Dr. Andrew J. Einstein, an ...
www.positron.com [cached]
Dr. Andrew J. Einstein, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, who testified before a Senate committee in 2008 about the isotope shortage, said supplies were adequate at the moment.
But he drew a biblical analogy. "This is the seven years of plenty," he said. "It certainly is time to be preparing for supply beyond Chalk River."
Dr. Einstein said that when tech 99 was not available, doctors could use substitutes, but that these gave the patient larger radiation doses or provided poorer image quality to the doctor.
And for some uses, doctors can substitute PET scans, he said.
pr_target
dev.rsna.org, 23 Feb 2010 [cached]
"Coronary CT angiography has generated great enthusiasm in recent years, due to its diagnostic accuracy in assessing patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease," said Andrew J. Einstein, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of clinical medicine in radiology and director of cardiac CT research at Columbia University Medical Center.
...
In his study, Dr. Einstein and a team of researchers compared the radiation exposure incurred during a coronary CT angiography procedure using a 64-detector row helical scanning and volume scanning, using a 320-detector row volume CT scanner. Phantoms simulating the male and female body were imaged using six different scan modes.
Using standard 64-detector row helical scanning as the benchmark, the effective radiation dose was reduced by 91 percent from 35.4 millisieverts (mSv) to 4.4 mSv using optimized 320-detector row volume scanning.
"By imaging the entire heart in one piece, volume scanning eliminates artifacts due to seams or gaps between image sections," said Dr. Einstein. "Moreover, the x-ray tube is left on for only a brief duration, as little as .35 seconds."
According to Dr. Einstein, state-of-the-art CT technology emphasizes optimal image resolution with the ability to lower radiation dose through a variety of features and scan modes that adjust and modulate the dose based on the specific needs of the individual patient.
"As CT technology advanced from 16- to 64-slice capabilities, the radiation dose went up significantly," he said. "Today, technology development is going in the opposite direction, reducing radiation exposure."
Dr. Einstein emphasized that practitioners must pay careful attention to using the appropriate scan mode to obtain diagnostic information with the least amount of radiation exposure to the patient.
# # #
"Radiation Dose from Single-Heartbeat Coronary CT Angiography Performed with a 320-Detector Row Volume Scanner. Collaborating with Dr. Einstein were Carl D. Elliston, M.A., Andrew E. Arai, M.D., Marcus Y. Chen, M.D., Richard Mather, Ph.D., Gregory D. N. Pearson, M.D., Ph.D., Robert L. DeLaPaz, M.D., Edward Nickoloff, D.Sc, Ajoy Dutta, M.S., and David J. Brenner, Ph.D., D.Sc.
This could involve tens of thousands ...
www.piedmonthospital.org, 3 Dec 2008 [cached]
This could involve tens of thousands of people and cost millions of dollars, says Dr. Andrew J. Einstein, director of cardiac computed tomography research at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City.
The study would aim at finding whether more intensive treatment of traditional risk factors would improve survival of people classified as high risk by the coronary artery calcium score.
"No study has compared patients who had intensive preventive therapy with those who didn't and see if it makes a difference in terms of the number of heart attacks people have," explains Dr. Einstein.
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