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This profile was last updated on 10/14/14  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Andrew B. Bocarsly

Wrong Dr. Andrew B. Bocarsly?

Professor of Chemistry

Princeton University
Dept. Of Rare Books And Special Collections One Washington Road
Princeton, New Jersey 08544
United States

Company Description: Princeton University simultaneously strives to be one of the leading research universities and the most outstanding undergraduate college in the world. As a...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • PhD , Chemistry
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • B.S. , Chemistry and Physics
    UCLA
71 Total References
Web References
Liquid Light | Make carbon dioxide a practical feedstock for multi-carbon chemicals
www.llchemical.com, 14 Oct 2014 [cached]
Dr. Andrew Bocarsly Co-Founder
Dr. Andrew Bocarsly is a professor of chemistry at Princeton University and a founder of Liquid Light, where he serves as Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board. A leading researcher in electrochemistry and renewable energy, he has worked for over 30 years on solar energy conversion, systems for energy storage and fuel cells. Dr. Bocarsly and his group at Princeton were the first in the world to develop a process for directly converting solar energy into liquid fuel using no additional energy source. He continues to work closely with Liquid Light developing new catalysts and systems for the efficient conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels and industrial chemicals.
Dr. Bocarsly received his B.S. in Chemistry and Physics from UCLA and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from MIT.
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Dr. Lakkaraju began working with Dr. Bocarsly on carbon dioxide conversion in 2007 as a Visiting Researcher Collaborator and Visiting Profesor at Princeton University.
Applied Semiconductor, Inc.- Science Advisors
www.appliedsemi.com, 27 May 2013 [cached]
Andrew Bocarsly, PhD Andrew Bocarsly, PhD, is Professor of Chemistry in the Chemistry Department of Princeton University, and is co-director of Princeton's Fuel Cell Laboratory. He received his PhD in 1980 from M.I.T. and is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Prof. Bocarsly recently has conducted the joint research program of Applied Semiconductor, Inc. and Princeton University, identifying basic chemical mechanisms involved in corrosion protection using Zeta n Technology.
Liquid Light :: About
www.liquidlightinc.com, 21 Sept 2012 [cached]
hrough its patent-pending catalytic platform originated from the renowned research lab of Professor Andrew Bocarsly at Princeton University, the Company's carbon conversion approach incorporates low-cost inputs with long-term pricing predictability, reduces capital expenditures by going direct from CO2 to the final product, achieves energy efficiency through its particular catalysts, and offers selective conversion to a desired end product.
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Dr. Andrew Bocarsly
Dr. Andrew Bocarsly is a professor of chemistry at Princeton University and a founder of Liquid Light, where he serves as Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board. A leading researcher in electrochemistry and renewable energy, he has worked for over 30 years on solar energy conversion, systems for energy storage and fuel cells. Dr. Bocarsly and his group at Princeton were the first in the world to develop a process for directly converting solar energy into liquid fuel using no additional energy source. He continues to work closely with Liquid Light developing new catalysts and systems for the efficient conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels and industrial chemicals.
Dr. Bocarsly received his B.S. in Chemistry and Physics from UCLA and his PhD in Chemistry from MIT.
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Prior to joining the company, Dr. Cole worked in the laboratory of Dr. Andrew Bocarsly developing the catalysts, systems, and processes needed for conversion of carbon dioxide to liquid fuels and industrial chemicals.
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Dr. Lakkaraju began working with Dr. Bocarsly on carbon dioxide conversion in 2007 as a Visiting Researcher Collaborator and Visiting Profesor at Princeton University.
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Dr. Andrew Bocarsly Chairman
Drawing on two of these approaches, ...
www.eurekalert.org, 1 July 2014 [cached]
Drawing on two of these approaches, researchers in the laboratory of Andrew Bocarsly, a Princeton professor of chemistry, collaborated with start-up company Liquid Light Inc. of Monmouth Junction, N.J. to devise an efficient method for harnessing sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into a potential alternative fuel known as formic acid. The study was published June 13 in the Journal of CO2 Utilization.
The transformation from carbon dioxide and water to formic acid was powered by a commercial solar panel generously provided by the energy company PSE&G that can be found atop electric poles across the state. The process takes place inside an electrochemical cell, which consists of metal plates the size of rectangular lunch-boxes that enclose liquid-carrying channels.
To maximize the efficiency of the system, the amount of power produced by the solar panel must match the amount of power the electrochemical cell can handle, said Bocarsly. This optimization process is called impedance matching.
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Using waste carbon dioxide and easily obtained machined parts, this approach offers a promising route to a renewable fuel, Bocarsly said.
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Read the full article here:
White, J. L.; Herb, J. T.; Kaczur, J. J.; Majsztrik, P. W.; Bocarsly, A. B. "Photons to formate: Efficient electrochemical solar energy conversion via reduction of carbon dioxide. Journal of CO2 Utilization. Available online June 13, 2014.
Pictured with the ...
www.rdmag.com, 2 July 2014 [cached]
Pictured with the photovoltaic-electrochemical cell system from left to right: Graduate student James White (Princeton), Professor Andrew Bocarsly (Princeton and Liquid Light) and principal engineer Paul Majsztrik (Liquid Light). Image: Frank Wojciechowski
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Drawing on two of these approaches, researchers in the laboratory of Andrew Bocarsly, a Princeton professor of chemistry, collaborated with researchers at start-up company Liquid Light Inc. of Monmouth Junction, New Jersey, to devise an efficient method for harnessing sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into a potential alternative fuel known as formic acid. The study was published June 13 in the Journal of CO2 Utilization.
The transformation from carbon dioxide and water to formic acid was powered by a commercial solar panel provided by the energy company PSE&G that can be found atop electric poles across New Jersey. The process takes place inside an electrochemical cell, which consists of metal plates the size of rectangular lunch-boxes that enclose liquid-carrying channels.
To maximize the efficiency of the system, the amount of power produced by the solar panel must match the amount of power the electrochemical cell can handle, said Bocarsly. This optimization process is called impedance matching.
...
Using waste carbon dioxide and easily obtained machined parts, this approach offers a promising route to a renewable fuel, Bocarsly said.
This work was financially supported by Liquid Light, Inc., which was cofounded by Bocarsly, and the National Science Foundation under grant no. CHE-0911114.
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