Last Update

2016-08-29T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Amy Florian?

Ms. Amy Florian

Chief Executive Officer

Corgenius Inc

Direct Phone: (847) ***-**** ext. *       

Email: a***@***.com

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Corgenius Inc

815 Woodlawn Street

Hoffman Estates, Illinois 60169

United States

Company Description

Clients in transition and loss. Client grief and bereavement support. You are a financial services professional, or estate planning attorney who wants to learn how to support a grieving client ... more

Find other employees at this company (1)

Background Information

Employment History

Adjunct Faculty

Loyola University

Adjunct Professor In A Graduate Department

Saint Xavier University

Regular Columnist

Journal of Financial Planning

Executive Director

Stauros U.S.A

Liturgy and Bereavement Consultant

Independent Consultant

Guest Lecturer

Chicago Theological Union

Affiliations

Fellow
Thanatology

Fellow
Association for Death Education and Counseling

Permanent Member of the Liturgy Staff
National Center

Education

MA

Master of Pastoral Studies degree

Loyola University

Master of Pastoral Studies degree

Loyola University of Chicago

Web References (199 Total References)


When Clients' Mental Capacity Diminishes: An Advisor's Role

www.thinkadvisor.com [cached]

Amy Florian, CEO of Corgenius, which specializes in educating businesspeople on death and dying and 'transitions.' Amy Florian, CEO of Corgenius, which specializes in educating businesspeople on death and dying and 'transitions.'

If you haven't yet dealt with the challenge of a client showing signs of diminished mental capacity, you will. And now is the time to prepare for that event, before you see the signs.
Amy Florian can deliver the alarming statistics on the likelihood that your clients-and you-will face that dreaded development associated with aging, but in an interview with ThinkAdvisor she also provided the steps an advisor should take, and when to take action, well before diminished capacity becomes a problem for your client and her family and your compliance department.
First, the sobering statistics. Florian, CEO of the consulting firm Corgenius, which specializes in educating businesspeople on death and dying and 'transitions' like how to serve older clients older, reports that one in nine people age 65 or older have some form of dementia, and almost half of people age 85 or older. There are 18 different diseases that can lead to dementia, with Alzheimer's disease by far the leading cause, followed by vascular dementia. However, one common misconception is that Alzheimer's and dementia are the same thing. They are not; you can have dementia and not have Alzheimer's, but if you suffer from Alzheimer's you do have dementia.
"We don't know the cause," says Florian, and "if we knew, then we'd have a better idea on how to prevent or treat" dementia. Some people can get early onset Alzheimer's in their 40's, and the 'familial' variety of Alzheimer's, she says, "is definitely genetic, but that's a small percentage" of those affected by the disease.
One thing we do know about dementia, Florian says, it that it "strikes as we get older. Moreover, "we can't predict who will get it," but Alzheimer's in particular "literally shrinks the brain."
The Challenges and Strategies for Advisors
The symptoms of dementia can start 10 to 12 years before a diagnosis, Florian says, but one important point for advisors is that "not every cognitive difficulty is due to dementia. The symptoms common to dementia (see next paragraph), might be caused by medications interacting with each other, she says, like anti-depressants. Even a fairly common condition like a urinary tract infection "can wreak havoc with cognition," she says, as can a B-12 vitamin deficiency.
Look for evidence of short-term memory loss, she counsels, along with changes in personality, such as when a person becomes "uncharacteristically inappropriate or angry. Symptoms include changes in depth perception, so sufferers "when driving around a corner may hit the curb," or they start tripping when walking up stairs. They might also mix up the names of common items, such as calling a toothbrush a "mouth cleaner," or mistakenly use a similar-sounding word when they can't remember the proper word, such as saying "amphibious" when they mean to say "ambidexterous."
Math functioning also "seems to be affected very soon" by dementia, Florian says, which advisors might notice when discussing a performance percentage or an investment product and the client no longer can figure a percentage in their heads or understand concepts they previously did, such as how an annuity works.
So what should an advisor do?
"What I recommend is that before there are any signs, do a diminished capacity letter," which Florian says is "basically a permission form to call certain people if you [the advisor] see anything wrong. The letter might say, 'I give you permission to call the person with my power of attorney, and John Smith and Jane Doe'" in the event of a perceived decline in cognitive ability. The letter, she warns, should also be updated every year.
When raising the issue with clients Florian also says it's important not to use freighted words like "Alzheimer's" in describing the conditions under which the diminished capacity letter could be implemented.
...
Florian will be discussing this topic in one session--and another on how to help clients who are "suddenly single," due to a spouse's death or divorce--during the Financial Planning Association's annual conference in Baltimore Sept. 14-16.


Amy ...

rmaconnect.com [cached]

Amy Florian

CEO, Thanatologist, Grief & Transition Author, Teacher & Coach
Teaching Service Professionals to Genuinely Support Clients Through Loss & Transition
...
Amy Florian's influence stretches across the Financial Services Industry. Travelling the world to train professionals to effectively support clients in transition, her work shines a light on the widely overlooked topics of grief and loss.
Amy's practical, insightful, and inspirational training is crucial in helping financial professionals do the right thing for clients, retain business across generations, and attract new business from less educated competitors. An acclaimed speaker and expert, she is the author of over 100 articles and the book "No Longer Awkward: Communicating with Clients through the Toughest Times of Life".
With knowledge based in Thanatology (grief education), psychology, sociology, and neurology, Amy has worked with over 2000 grieving people. Combined, this advanced education and experience provides a unique perspective on how your clients and prospects want to be supported during life transitions.
Some of the things that Amy teaches
...
Few leaders match Amy Florian's impact. Combining science, personal experience, and extensive education, she's taught thousands of advisors how to support their aging clientele in loss and transition, re-defining the advisor-client relationship. The industry is taking notice. She is extensively quoted in the trade press. Her conference survey ratings average 9.6 out of 10 (i.e. at Schwab IMPACT, she's been the 2nd or 3rd highest rated speaker for three consecutive years). As they face the coming "death boom", many firms, RIA's, and broker-dealers are positioning themselves for growth by implementing her teachings. She pushes the industry forward in crucial ways
Being that my practice has an emphasis on surviving spouses, I was very interested when the FPA of Illinois invited Amy to our Distinguished Speakers Series. Her presentation on the grief process was so powerful I retained her services as a consultant which has proven instrumental to my practice.
...
Here are just some of the organizations Amy has helped provide a higher level of service for their clients.
...
Amy Florian is the CEO of Corgenius, and she combines the best of neuroscience and psychology with a good dose of humor in training professionals to build strong relationships with clients through all the losses and transitions of life.
An acclaimed speaker and expert, she is author of over 100 articles and the book "No Longer Awkward: Communicating with Clients through the Toughest Times of Life". She was recently named one of the 20 Most Creative People in Insurance and Financial Services for her groundbreaking work, and she also was honored as an "Influential Woman in Business" from the National Association of Women Business Owners.
Amy is a former columnist for the Journal of Financial Planning who has been quoted or featured in publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Financial Advisor, Financial Planning, MSN Money, On Wall Street, ThinkAdvisor, Registered Rep, Investment News, Wealth Management, and Financial Advisor IQ.
Amy holds a Master's Degree and is a Fellow in Thanatology (the highest level of certification in the field of grief studies).
She taught a graduate class at Loyola University of Chicago for almost 10 years, she has worked with over 2,000 grieving people, and she consults with firms, corporations, and individuals nationwide.
...
With exceptional grace, good-natured humor, and rock-solid science, Amy Florian teaches people how to support their friends and family in times of grief, loss, and transition.


2014 Fall Conference Speaker - NAPFA - The National Association of Personal Financial Advisors

www.napfa.org [cached]

Amy Florian

...
Amy Florian
Amy Florian, CEO of Corgenius, combines the best of neuroscience and psychology with a good dose of humor in training professionals to build strong relationships with clients through all the losses and transitions of life.
An acclaimed speaker and expert, she is author of over 100 articles and the book "No Longer Awkward: Communicating with Clients through the Toughest Times of Life". Amy is a former columnist for the Journal of Financial Planning who has been quoted or featured in the Wall Street Journal, Financial Advisor, Financial Planning, MSN Money, On Wall Street, ThinkAdvisor, Wealth Management, and Financial Advisor IQ. She holds a Master's Degree and is a Fellow in Thanatology (the highest level of certification in the field of grief studies). She teaches a graduate class at Loyola University Chicago, she has worked with over 2,000 grieving people, and she consults with firms, corporations, and individuals nationwide.


Resources & News |

frissebrewsterlaw.com [cached]

In her article, The #1 Thing To Say Instead of "I Know How You Feel", Amy Florian of Corgenius recognizes how helpless many of us feel when we're talking to someone coping with grief.

...
If you know someone coping with some of life's challenges, maybe you can benefit from the tools shared in Ms. Florian's article.


FPAcharlotte.org > Calendar of Events > Master Calendar

www.fpacharlotte.org [cached]

Speaker: Amy Florian, CEO, Corgenius

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