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Wrong Amanda Bryant?

Amanda Bryant

Sea Turtle Coordinator

SCCF

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

SCCF

Background Information

Employment History

Biologist

Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation


Web References(37 Total References)


beta.captivasanibel.com

Bryant, Serage-Century demonstrate dedication of SCCF's sea turtle nest volunteers
Those numbers may appear to put a smile on the face of Amanda Bryant, coordinator of SCCF's Sea Turtle Research & Monitoring Program, but it certainly doesn't make her want to sit back and rest on her laurels. In fact, it wants her want to do even more to help the species. Last Thursday, Bryant and fellow sea turtle aficionado Dee Serage-Century headed out in the early morning hours to patrol the seven-mile stretch of shoreline - between Tarpon Bay Beach and Bowman's Beach - monitoring activity in and around nesting sites staked by themselves and other program volunteers. "We might have 10 nests to check in one day, and all of them are supposed to hatch around the same time," said Bryant, sitting in the back of the Wildlife Habitat Management Jeep driven by Serage-Century. On Aug. 4, Bryant and Serage-Century checked approximately three dozen nesting sites, which according to their calculations were discovered about a month ahead of time this season, which typically runs from May 1 to Oct. 31. Because the temperatures of Gulf waters were warmer - 80 degrees F is the optimal mating temperature, Bryant explained - earlier this year, nests started being discovered in early April. "We will probably finish a lot of our work earlier this year," said Bryant. But before visiting the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in person, Bryant was a bit skeptical about collecting the young hatchlings in the name of science. "Actually, these cages help protect the hatchling from predators," said Bryant after placing one of the final two wire structures required for the study. During their sweep of the staked nesting sites, Bryant identified several factors which threaten the viability of the sea turtles' eggs. Ghost crabs, fire ants and raccoons are most prevalent, in addition to nests which are laid too close to the incoming tides. Serage-Century and Bryant, however, did a double-take when they happened upon an unusual sight: a large set of tracks running from the shoreline, up onto a raised patch of sand, then returning back to the water. "Yup, it's definitely a green," responded Bryant, returning to the Jeep for nest-staking supplies. Bryant also noted that during the current nesting season, there have been several instances of beachgoers interfering with the nesting attempts of sea turtles here on the islands. Nesting attempts have been abandoned due to beach furniture, tents, towels and other debris left along the shoreline, as well as a number of nesting attempts interrupted by uneducated beachgoers. After a certain number of attempts, a sea turtle that has been unable to nest will eject its eggs in the water, so failed nesting attempts matter greatly, she noted. While none of the nests which were scheduled to be dug last Thursday yielded any live hatchlings, Bryant and Serage-Century did discover another atypical species along the sand: a Florida softshell turtle - which aren't usually seen along Sanibel's beaches - was found just south of Bowman's Beach. "We do the best we can because we are on the beach every day," added Bryant, who bravely held the captive turtle in the cloth-covered bin during the short drive to CROW. "All in a day's work," added Bryant. Amanda Bryant, left, and Dee Serage-Century, patrolling the shoreline for sea turtle activity, staked a newly discovered nest last Thursday morning. Amanda Bryant digs a trench in order to bury the cage collecting young hatchlings.


www.evergladesfoundation.org

SCCF Sea Turtle Coordinator Amanda Bryant (photo left and below) with Herpetologist Chris Lechowicz (photo below) dug the nest on the morning of August 3.
Hatched nests are normally dug after three days but the nest was dug early because it was in immediate danger of predation (a ghost crab was already digging in the nest when Bryant arrived). NBC-2 came out and interviewed Amanda on August 3, click here for link to the clip on their web site. To learn more about leatherback sea turtles, National Geographic has some excellent information; click here for link. See below for photo of an adult leatherback. SCCF coordinates over 100 volunteers who monitor sea turtle nesting on the islands each season, from May through October. Above: Chris and Amanda by the nest with some of the empty egg shells; the four live hatchlings are in the covered bucket.


www.sanibel-captiva-islander.com

Sea turtle volunteer Carol Strange, left, and SCCF sea turtle coordinator Amanda Bryant place a stake where they located a loggerhead turtle nest on the West End of Sanibel Island. Amanda Bryant is taking on the newly created position of SCCF sea turtle coordinator this year, and she is thrilled to be a part of the program. "It's an honor to get to work with (the turtles) and work toward their conservation," she said."You really take pride in what you do for them."Bryant is also excited to work with an enthusiastic gang of volunteers this summer. "They're by far one of the most dedicated groups of volunteers I've ever encountered," she said."They're out every morning between sunrise and 7:30 a.m.Now, granted, the conditions are lovely.It's wonderful to walk or drive on the beach, but to even commit that large amount of time over the course of the season, they're just really impressive.They've been really great with me and understanding that I've not worked with the turtle program before, but that I'm willing to give 110 percent, and I think they appreciate that as much as I appreciate them."Bryant is encouraged by the volunteers' willingness to educate the public about sea turtles. "Every person that learns just a little bit about sea turtle conservation is one person that is less likely to do something they're not supposed to do," she said. Permittee Carol Strange has been a sea turtle volunteer for seven years, and she is glad to have Bryant around. "Amanda keeps us all informed so that we're very aware of what's going on," she said.


www.sanibel-captiva-islander.com

Sea turtle volunteer Carol Strange, left, and SCCF sea turtle coordinator Amanda Bryant place a stake where they located a loggerhead turtle nest on the West End of Sanibel Island.



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