No Photo Available

Last Update

2014-11-30T00:00:00.000Z

This profile was last updated on .

Is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Ama Mazama?

Dr. Ama Mazama

Associate Editor

Journal of Black Studies

Get ZoomInfo Grow

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Journal of Black Studies

Background Information

Employment History

African American Studies Professor

Temple University

Education

Ph.D.

University of La Sorbonne

Ph.D.

Linguistics

University Of La Sorbonne , Paris

Web References (32 Total References)


BSTPHD

www.professorevans.net [cached]

Dr. Ama Mazama is Associate Professor of African American Studies at Temple University. Regarded as one of the leading Afrocentric theorists, she has published eight books and more than 50 articles. Her works include, The Afrocentric Paradigm (2003) and L' Impératif Afrocentrique(2003). Furthermore, she is the co-editor of The Encyclopedia of Black Studies (2005) and of the Encyclopedia of African Religion (2008) Dr. Mazama is the Associate Editor of the Journal of Black Studies. She received her Ph.D. from the University of La Sorbonne, Paris III, where she studied African Caribbean languages. Her work has been published internationally, in Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, Europe and the United States. She was also initiated as a Mambo in Haiti.


Biography | Dr. Molefi Kete Asante

www.asante.net [cached]

Considered by his peers to be one of the most distinguished contemporary scholars, Asante has published 70 books, among the most recent are Maulana Karenga: An Intellectual Portrait, An Afrocentric Manifesto, Encyclopedia of African Religion, co-edited with Ama Mazama, The History of Africa: The Quest for Eternal Harmony, Cheikh Anta Diop: An Intellectual Portrait, Handbook of Black Studies, co-edited with Maulana Karenga, Encyclopedia of Black Studies, co-edited with Ama Mazama, Race, Rhetoric, and Identity: The Architecton of Soul, Erasing Racism: The Survival of the American Nation, Ancient Egyptian Philosophers, Scattered to the Wind, Custom and Culture of Egypt, and 100 Greatest African Americans.

...
Considered by his peers to be one of the most distinguished contemporary scholars, Asante has published 70 books, among the most recent are Maulana Karenga: An Intellectual Portrait, An Afrocentric Manifesto, Encyclopedia of African Religion, co-edited with Ama Mazama, The History of Africa: The Quest for Eternal Harmony, Cheikh Anta Diop: An Intellectual Portrait, Handbook of Black Studies, co-edited with Maulana Karenga, Encyclopedia of Black Studies, co-edited with Ama Mazama, Race, Rhetoric, and Identity: The Architecton of Soul, Erasing Racism: The Survival of the American Nation, Ancient Egyptian Philosophers, Scattered to the Wind, Custom and Culture of Egypt, and 100 Greatest African Americans.
...
The comprehensive Encyclopedia of African Religion, co-edited with Ama Mazama, will be published by Sage Publications in December 2008.


Ama ...

journalofafricanamericanmales.com [cached]

Ama Mazama

Temple University


More and more black parents are home-schooling their children - Business Insider

feedproxy.google.com [cached]

In short, in order to protect their children from school-related racism, more black parents are keeping their kids out of school entirely, writes Ama Mazama, a professor of African American Studies at Temple University in Philadelphia who has written extensively on home-schooling. She has dubbed the movement "racial protectionism."


Ama Mazama, slight in stature ...

www.phillymag.com [cached]

Ama Mazama, slight in stature and wearing a tightly fastened Ruth Bader Ginsberg ponytail, is revving up an Epson projector on a cold and rainy December morning. The head of graduate African-American studies at Temple University, Mazama - a self-chosen name that translates to "tender and violent love" - is both gentle and commanding at the head of a class. When she's listening to you, the 48-year-old mother of three squints ever so slightly, as if not quite hearing you or not quite trusting your line of reason. But she politely guides you, in her French-Caribbean accent, to a logical answer nonetheless.

Mazama teaches a lesson on cognitive psychology in a classroom that looks ill-equipped for the task: devoid of whiteboards and desks, outfitted with drums and a piano. There's commotion from a dog in the nearby kitchen. Only two pupils are present. The four of us are cloistered in the "music room" within Mazama's three-story stone home in Germantown.
As she introduces today's discussion topic - spiritual intelligence - I can't help but think it's a little heavy for her 10-year-old son, Kiamuya, and 13-year-old daughter, Tamu. Minutes later, the three are not only discussing an array of metaphysical ideas; they're doing so bilingually, alternating "okay" with "d'accord. Mazama's kids scribble in their notebooks and exchange occasional giggles, the way children in the back of a traditional classroom would. But their curriculum is far from traditional, even by homeschooling standards.
Mazama is known nationally as an Afrocentrist scholar and linguist, a translator of Marcus Garvey, and, increasingly, one of the most prominent voices of an emerging segment of alternative education: black homeschooling.
...
When Mazama started teaching her oldest boy 13 years ago, she says, there was nothing by way of research on the topic. The assumption was that the motivations of homeschooling black Americans were no different from those of the two archetypal camps that were doing so: religious fundamentalists and crunchy-granola progressives.
"People assumed they were doing it for the same reason as white parents," Mazama says. But once she started interviewing parents in seven regions across the country, she found otherwise. Black parents were nearly as likely to cite racism (24 percent) as their primary motivation as they were to blame the low quality of education in brick-and-mortar schools (25 percent). When Mazama dug deeper, interviewing parents one-on-one, she reached a more damning conclusion: "Racism was interwoven into every reason why they disengaged."
By racism, she means not only bigoted name-calling, but the full gamut of marginalization within schools: the dearth of black teachers; the over-representation of blacks in special education and disciplinary actions; their under-representation in honor tracks; the Eurocentricity of curricula; the 15-point gap in high-school graduation rates between blacks and whites. But the data, however important, wasn't as devastating as what Mazama heard. As much as parents want to believe in American education as the great equalizer, its infrastructure remains skewed for some to succeed and others to fail - or, at best, simply to get by.
"It's not necessarily that they stopped believing in quote-unquote the American Dream," says Mazama.
...
With double standards in schools ranging from cash-strapped inner-city institutions to those in posh suburban districts, Mazama found that black parents didn't know where to turn to educate their kids.
...
In her homeschooling, Mazama moves to circumvent that "imposition of whiteness. Aside from a novel each by John Steinbeck and Ernest Hemingway (she has a soft spot for those stories), her children read no white authors; during the lesson on spiritual intelligence, all the examples in Mazama's PowerPoint were African-American or Native American. "I made a point of not teaching anything from white history, white literature, white nothing," she says.
...
When I ask Mazama what she's heard about a homeschooling center opening up less than a mile from her home, I get one of her gentle, skeptical stares. We're standing in her foyer, the sound of rain pattering outside. She knows nothing about Natural Creativity - a response suggesting that homeschooling is growing too fast for even a researcher to keep up.
A racially integrated homeschool experiment like Natural Creativity is another means to expand the growing share of black self-educators, so Mazama is all for it. She points out that Maryland's Prince George's County, the bastion of black upper-middle-class life in America, has a booming black homeschooling population. Mazama doesn't think it's a coincidence. "These are black people who see that there's definitely a problem and they decide to do something about it, to remove themselves physically from that environment," she says.
With racial inequality seemingly at every turn of their children's lives, black parents view homeschooling as an opportunity to claim authority over at least one area: education. Consider it a new twist on the old African-American proverb "Each one teach one. Ever the iconoclast, Mazama sees the potential for this movement to ripple out through society: "There was this woman I spoke to who always would say this: 'If all those black men in prison had been homeschooled, they would not have ended up there.'"

Similar Profiles

Other People with this Name

Other people with the name Mazama

Ama Mazama
MKA Institute

Ama Mazama
The Washington Post Company

Ama Mazama

Ama Mazama
EDS Corporation

City Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's Business Contact Directory by City

People Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

Company Directory Icon

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory