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This profile was last updated on 2/13/15  and contains information from public web pages and contributions from the ZoomInfo community.

Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr.

Wrong Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr.?

Regents Professor and Chair

Georgia Regents University
1120 15Th St.
Augusta , Georgia 30912
United States

 
Background

Employment History

Education

  • doctorate in pharmacology
    University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy
24 Total References
Web References
Prime Behavior Testing Laboratories - About Us
www.pbtli.com, 18 Dec 2014 [cached]
Alvin V. Terry, Jr., Ph.D.
President and CEO
Dr. Terry is a tenured Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Director of the Small Animal Behavior Core facility at Georgia Health Sciences University. He also holds joint appointments as Professor of Neurology and Graduate Studies at GHSU and is a licensed pharmacist in Georgia and South Carolina. He has more than 20 years of research experience in neuropharmacology and drug development and has conducted numerous collaborative projects and contracts with the pharmaceutical industry.
Dr. Terry's study, ...
www.91outcomes.com, 21 Mar 2012 [cached]
Dr. Terry's study, "Organophosphate-Related Alterations in Myelin and Axonal Transport in the Living Mammalian Brain," was funded with FY11 GWI CDMRP funds. At the end of an arduous sifting and winnowing process, the well qualified proposals that made it to the final stage of evaluation totalled nearly $31 million. With just a Congressional appropriation of just $8 million, only six were able to be funded, including Dr. Terry's important study that, if successful, will help identify specific targets for treatment.
...
Dr. Alvin Terry, a professor at GHSU, and his colleague, Dr. Nathan Yanasak, are conducting a three-year study on the neurological symptoms of Gulf War illness. JACKIE RICCIARDI/STAFF
...
Dr. Alvin Terry, a professor at GHSU, and his colleague, Dr. Nathan Yanasak, are conducting a three-year study on the neurological symptoms of Gulf War illness.
...
Troops were also routinely exposed to the chemical in insecticides, said Dr. Alvin Terry, the director of the Animal Behavior Center at GHSU and professor of pharmacology and toxicology. Terry and a colleague, Dr. Nathan Yanasak, have an $860,000, three-year grant from the DOD to study whether the chemicals can cause nerve damage in the brains of animals - in this case, mice - that could lead to memory and attention problems.
...
"For it to maintain its health, it has to be able to transport things" along the axon of the nerve, Terry said. The researchers are using newer technology, such as manganese-enhanced MRI, to study that because manganese is known to be taken up and transported by nerves in the brain, he said. Researchers will also check whether the protective sheath of the nerve cells, known as myelin, is depleted by the low-level exposure, which can affect nerve firing. "It's probably subtle if it is there," Terry said. In previous work, including a study published this year, Terry and colleagues showed that "subthreshold" doses of the chemical caused memory and attention problems in rats even months later. "Long after they have been exposed, you can still pick up on these memory deficits," he said. What makes that intriguing is that it is similar to problems that plague veterans with Gulf War illness, Terry said. The study in animals is is being done to find out whether that is the cause of the symptoms, which could stem from a number of other causes, such as the oil well fires that raged during the conflict and had wide exposure, Terry said. "There's a whole multitude of things that you could say might be a possibility," he said. The DOD has funded research over the years into what might cause Gulf War illness, "but no one has really solved it. There have been a lot of controversies." His work has drawn some fire from chemical companies, but Terry said he strives for balance in his view of the chemicals. "They have without a doubt dramatically improved farming productivity, and they have helped to get rid of vector-bone illnesses," he said.
Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr., ...
www.takeastandgeorgia.com, 27 Dec 2012 [cached]
Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr., pharmacologist and Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University, has been named a Regents’ Professor by the University System of Georgia. Regents’ Professorships are awarded to outstanding faculty members of Georgia’s four research universities with the unanimous recommendation of the university’s President, the Dean of the graduate school, the administrative Dean, the academic Dean, and three other faculty members named by the President. Approval of the Chancellor and the University System’s Committee on Education, Research and Extension also is required and professorships are granted initially for three years. Continue reading →]]>
AUGUSTA, Ga. â€" Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr., pharmacologist and Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University, has been named a Regents’ Professor by the University System of Georgia.
Regents’ Professorships are awarded to outstanding faculty members of Georgia’s four research universities with the unanimous recommendation of the university’s President, the Dean of the graduate school, the administrative Dean, the academic Dean, and three other faculty members named by the President. Approval of the Chancellor and the University System’s Committee on Education, Research and Extension also is required and professorships are granted initially for three years.
Terry, Director of GHSU’s Small Animal Behavior Core laboratory, earned his doctorate in pharmacology at the University of South Carolina College of Pharmacy and completed his postdoctoral training at MCG. He joined the MCG faculty immediately after completing his training and joined the University of Georgia College of Pharmacy faculty in 1994. He directed the college’s Graduate Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics from 1999-2005, began a joint appointment at MCG in 2003 and joined the MCG faculty full time two years later.
He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, has served on numerous study sections of the National Institutes of Health and two Veterans Affairs Special Emphasis Panels on research on Gulf War illness in veterans. He has served as a consultant for an Environmental Protection Agency Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel.
Terry's researches the role of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in memory dysfunction, including the impact of pharmaceutical and toxicological agents, such as chemical warfare agents. Â His lab also focuses on drug discovery and development strategies for the treatment of illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. He is an educator at MCG and the GHSU College of Graduate Studies and serves as a relief pharmacist for chain and independent retail pharmacies.
ScienceDaily News Release: UGA, MCG Study Impact Of Long-term Use Of Schizophrenia Drugs
www.sciencedaily.com, 17 Sept 2003 [cached]
Many of the older antipsychotics used to quell delusions and hallucinations - the hallmark of schizophrenia - also impair the ability to think, learn and remember, says Dr. Alvin V. Terry Jr., pharmacist and pharmacologist at UGA and MCG.
"Cognitive dysfunction has become a hot issue in schizophrenia research," says Dr. Terry, principal investigator on a $1.1 million National Institute of Mental Health grant to compare the cognitive effects of typical antipsychotics and their newer counterparts called atypicals.
...
"The traditional side effects always quoted for the older (typical) antipsychotic drugs are parkinsonian-type movement disorders," says Dr. Terry.In fact, that debilitating side effect is a primary reason that, outside of hospital walls, many patients refuse to take their medication, he says.
...
Their previous studies yielded no hard evidence that the newer drugs cause these types of changes, but Dr. Terry said one reason for increasing the duration to 180 days was some "tantalizing" evidence indicating that at the 90-day point some adverse changes might be in the making.
"At least from a pharmacologic standpoint, these drugs given chronically - as they are to patients - have not been adequately studied," Dr. Terry says.
Research Team
www.pbtli.com, 27 Feb 2010 [cached]
Alvin V. Terry Jr., Ph.D., tenured Associate Professor of Pharmacy and Director of the Program in Clinical and Experimental Therapeutics, University of Georgia, College of Pharmacy, has approximately 10 years of research experience in neuropharmacology and drug development and approximately 6 years of experience in association with the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Terry is also a licensed pharmacist in Georgia and South Carolina and has conducted several collaborative projects and contracts with drug companies previously.
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