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2016-10-21T00:00:00.000Z

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Wrong Allen Hamdan?

Dr. Allen D. Hamdan MD

Vice Chair, Surgery

Harvard University

Direct Phone: (617) ***-****       

Email: a***@***.edu

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Harvard University

12 Oxford St. # 373

Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138

United States

Company Description

The Harvard Art Museums, among the world's leading art institutions, comprise three museums (Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler) and four research centers (Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, the Center for the Technical Stud ... more

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Background Information

Employment History

Clinical Director, Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Affiliations

Board of Advisors Chair
The Greater Boston Food Bank Inc

ADVISORY BOARD Member
Present eLearning Systems LLC

Advisory Board Member
Podiatry.com

ADVISORY BOARD Member
PRESENT LLC

Education

M.D.

Web References (95 Total References)


HealthScout-Vascular Surgery Safe for Diabetics

www.healthscout.com [cached]

In previous studies, the death rate on the procedure has been as high as 4 percent, says study author Dr. Allen D. Hamdan.

"Having diabetes does not predict a higher risk for vascular surgery.In fact, there was a lower morbidity rate," says Hamdan, a vascular surgeon at Deaconess and an assistant professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School."What this means is that people with diabetes should be treated like anyone else, on a case-by-case basis, with regard to surgery."
There are about 16 million diabetics in the United States, and 800,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, Hamdan says.The disease compromises the circulatory system, so diabetics have significantly more vascular problems such as clotting and risk of gangrene in their outer limbs.
"It is an underlying truth" that patients with diabetes have accelerated hardening of the arteries that leads to problems all over the body at an earlier age and at a more accelerated rate, he says.
This led to the belief that "diabetics were felt to have a different type of vascular damage than non-diabetics.The feeling was that those with diabetes had worse blockages than people without diabetes," Hamdan says."Because of this, simply the presence of diabetes was thought to be an indicator of higher risk for surgery."
As a result, he says, patients were -- and still are -- often advised to have amputations rather than vascular surgery that might improve circulation.
However, Hamden and his colleagues statistically analyzed outcomes for surgeries in the arteries of the neck and extremities, as well as arteries leading to the heart.They found diabetics had a death rate of 0.96 percent, compared with a 1.46 percent rate for non-diabetics who had the same operation.Hamden says the results were a surprise.
However, he adds, his department works very closely with the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and the outcome might reflect their careful attention to diabetics.
"We have a very coordinated, multi-disciplinary system with close ties to endocrinologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists and nurses who specialize in diabetes," he says.
...
SOURCES: Allen D. Hamdan, M.D., vascular surgeon, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and assistant professor, surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Renee Meehan, R.N., B.S.N., M.A., C.D.E., diabetic clinical nurse specialist, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Fla.; April 2002 Archives of Surgery


Healthtalk / Healthscout News

www.htinet.com [cached]

In previous studies, the death rate on the procedure has been as high as 4 percent, says study author Dr. Allen D. Hamdan.

"Having diabetes does not predict a higher risk for vascular surgery.In fact, there was a lower morbidity rate," says Hamdan, a vascular surgeon at Deaconess and an assistant professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School."What this means is that people with diabetes should be treated like anyone else, on a case-by-case basis, with regard to surgery."
There are about 16 million diabetics in the United States, and 800,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, Hamdan says.The disease compromises the circulatory system, so diabetics have significantly more vascular problems such as clotting and risk of gangrene in their outer limbs.
"It is an underlying truth" that patients with diabetes have accelerated hardening of the arteries that leads to problems all over the body at an earlier age and at a more accelerated rate, he says.
This led to the belief that "diabetics were felt to have a different type of vascular damage than non-diabetics.The feeling was that those with diabetes had worse blockages than people without diabetes," Hamdan says."Because of this, simply the presence of diabetes was thought to be an indicator of higher risk for surgery."
As a result, he says, patients were -- and still are -- often advised to have amputations rather than vascular surgery that might improve circulation.
However, Hamden and his colleagues statistically analyzed outcomes for surgeries in the arteries of the neck and extremities, as well as arteries leading to the heart.They found diabetics had a death rate of 0.96 percent, compared with a 1.46 percent rate for non-diabetics who had the same operation.Hamden says the results were a surprise.
However, he adds, his department works very closely with the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, and the outcome might reflect their careful attention to diabetics.
"We have a very coordinated, multi-disciplinary system with close ties to endocrinologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists and nurses who specialize in diabetes," he says.
...
SOURCES: Allen D. Hamdan, M.D., vascular surgeon, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and assistant professor, surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston; Renee Meehan, R.N., B.S.N., M.A., C.D.E., diabetic clinical nurse specialist, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Fla.; April 2002 Archives of Surgery


Allen Hamden, MD (Vascular ...

www.bidmc.org [cached]

Allen Hamden, MD (Vascular Surgery)


The Greater Boston Food Bank | Executives and Board

www.gbfb.org [cached]

Dr. Allen Hamdan, Chair Vice Chair of Vascular Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


The Greater Boston Food Bank | Executives and Board

gbfb.org [cached]

Dr. Allen Hamdan, Chair Vice Chair of Vascular Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

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