Need more? Try out  Advanced Search (20+ criteria)»

logo

Last Update

This profile was last updated on 5/20/2017 and contains contributions from the  Zoominfo Community.

is this you? Claim your profile.

Wrong Alice Wingwall?

Alice Wingwall

Architecture Professor

Berkeley

HQ Phone:  (510) 549-0800

GET ZOOMINFO GROW

+ Get 10 Free Contacts a Month

Please agree to the terms and conditions.

I agree to the  Terms of Service and  Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Grow at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

THANK YOU FOR DOWNLOADING!

computers
  • 1.Download
    ZoomInfo Grow
    v sign
  • 2.Run Installation
    Wizard
  • 3.Check your inbox to
    Sign in to ZoomInfo Grow

I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Berkeley

2150 Shattuck Aveune, Penthouse

Berkeley, California,94704

United States

Company Description

The first school of public health west of the Mississippi, the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health was founded in 1943 on the Berkeley campus. It is one of 50 schools accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. The UC Berk...more

Background Information

Employment History

College Library


Contributor

KQED Inc


Professor of Sculpture and Director of the Studio Arts Program

Wellesley College


Affiliations

Kronos Quartet

Board Member


Creative Growth

Board Member


Education

architectural history

Royal Academy of Art


M.F.A.

sculpture

UC Berkeley


MFA

Indiana University


Web References(35 Total References)


Marking Blind - Amanda Cachia

www.amandacachia.com [cached]

Alice Wingwall, Thumbs Up at the Grand Hotel (in Lund, Sweden), n.d., Photograph
Alice Wingwall, Thumbs Up at the Grand Hotel (in Lund, Sweden), n.d., Photograph Alice Wingwall, Untitled, n.d., Photograph Alice Wingwall, Wingwall Marches On, Triumphantly, 2010, Photograph Alice Wingwall, Wingwall Marches On, Triumphantly, 2010, Photograph Raphaëlle de Groot (Montreal), Robert Morris (New York), Carmen Papalia (Vancouver), Alice Wingwall (Berkeley) This online exhibition showcases the work of four contemporary artists, Raphaëlle de Groot, Robert Morris, Carmen Papalia, and Alice Wingwall, who all have different relationships to blindness and visual impairment, and includes drawings, photography, video and mixed media.


Untitled Document

www.charlesmoore.org [cached]

Donlyn Lyndon & Alice Wingwall, Berkeley


www.blindatthemuseum.com

Alice Wingwall, Artist, Berkeley
Alice Wingwall is an artist who works in a wide range of media, including photography, sculpture, and film.


www.photoarts.com

John Dugdale, Sophie Calle, William Henry Fox Talbot, Alice Wingwall, ...


Berkeley: Blind photographer's vision extends beyond her eyes

www.sfgate.com [cached]

"Most people think it's not possible, but the rest of us are out here slogging away," said Wingwall, whose ability to perceive light all but vanished about four years ago from retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary disease she has had since she was a young woman.Opening Feb. 17, a companion show at the Townsend focuses on Wingwall's photography. Wingwall, who is married to architect and UC Berkeley architecture professor Donlyn Lyndon and has three children and three grandchildren, has advantages that many blind artists lack.She had been a respected conceptual artist long before her eyesight failed.Her disability developed slowly, enabling her to adjust.Perhaps most important, her visual memory is rich from a lifetime of working and traveling. She can't make out edges now unless the light is very bright, but memory keeps her encounters with sculpture and architecture alive in her mind and available to guide new work, such as "Cordelia's Granite Waterway," a four- pooled water sculpture she created in 2002 for a residence in Austin, Texas.She can't see colors, but memory lets her experience her favorite -- magenta -- as intensely as when her eyes could translate to her brain the frequency known as red. In some ways color is more vital to Wingwall as a blind woman.Along with humor and industry, it's a critical part of how she keeps her spirit and identity strong in spite of the trauma of her disability.She expresses her attitude every day by wearing bright clothes. "I have this one idea, which is 'see or be seen,' " she said."If I can't see, I'm going to make myself feel better and everybody else look at these wonderful colors -- mostly red, orange, electric blue, magenta, fuchsia." Along with fully lit memories, Wingwall combines elements gathered by touch and sound as her vision faded and finally went dark."It's like now he's entered my life and he's a gigantic presence," Wingwall said. The adjustments in perspective that Wingwall has made since going blind also apply to how she frames images.She has a newfound freedom about where the edges of a picture should go.The clear-cut centering that a person with eyesight takes for granted isn't available to someone who can't see. "The edge just starts going," Wingwall said."I don't really start with the frame.Lately I've been trying to work with things, trying to bunch up against the frame." A photographer fully tuned to light and architectural history might see her task as to capture the full unity of a building such as San Trovaso, a historic church in Venice.But to make her "Self-Portrait at San Trovaso," Wingwall photographed the front of the church and composed a mosaic of architectural parts and parts of herself.Curved decorative stone pieces became hair curls around her face, a round window became her torso, an engraved stone from ancient Rome her pelvis and a column one of her legs, paired with an image of one of her real legs. Wingwall's passion for architecture is reflected in her name.Inspired by a street shrine on a Roman building with a stone cherub who seemed to be pulling the building forward despite having lost one of her wings, she changed her name to Wingwall in 1980.She was born Alice Atkinson in Indianapolis and grew up in rural Indiana. Wingwall co-directed a short autobiographical film, "Miss BlindSight/The Wingwall Auditions."Since going blind she has become more interested in movement and hopes to make more films. "You can have bad days," she said."You can sit there and cry.Then you think there's always something I want to do.Better get up and load the film." In addition to photography, Wingwall is working on a project with a rugmaker in Sonoma County, Hansine Pedersen Goran.They're designing a rug based on one of her drawings, showing the artist's hand holding a coin with a Roman temple engraved on it.She is working on a second design that will be dominated by dark red and will include a written message. "What I'm going to have on that one are Braille dots for three words: lumière, magenta and aileron," she said. -- "Blind at the Museum," an exhibition of the work of Alice Wingwall and other blind or visually impaired artists, UC Berkeley Art Museum, through July 24. $8, $5 for seniors and students ages 12-18. (510) 642-0808. www.bampfa.berkeley.edu. -- A free public conference on visual impairment and art is set for 4-7 p.m. March 11-12, in the Museum Theater, with a public reception for the artist 6-7 p.m. March 11. -- A companion show highlighting Wingwall's work runs Feb.17-April 4 at the Townsend Center Gallery, 220 Stephens Hall on the UC campus.A conversation between Wingwall and John Terry, dean of fine arts at the Rhode Island School of Design, with a screening of Wingwall's film "Miss BlindSight/The Wingwall Auditions," takes place at the gallery 4 to 6 p.m. March 3.A conversation between Wingwall and John Terry, dean of fine arts at the Rhode Island School of Design, with a screening of Wingwall's film "Miss BlindSight/The Wingwall Auditions," takes place at the gallery 4 to 6 p.m. March 3.


Similar Profiles

city

Browse ZoomInfo's Business
Contact Directory by City

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Business People Directory

city

Browse ZoomInfo's
Advanced Company Directory