Share This Profile
Share this profile on Facebook.
Link to this profile on LinkedIn.
Tweet this profile on Twitter.
Email a link to this profile.
See other services through which you can share this profile.
This profile was last updated on 8/22/14  and contains information from public web pages.

Ms. Alice Irby

Wrong Alice Irby?

Board Member

Phone: (603) ***-****  HQ Phone
Measured Progress Inc
100 Education Way P.O. Box 1217
Dover, New Hampshire 03820
United States

Company Description: When the Common Core State Standards were initially released in 2011, Measured Progress's team of curriculum and assessment experts carefully analyzed the...   more
Background

Employment History

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Founder
    Jobs Corps

Education

  • master's degree
    Duke University
  • bachelor's degree
    University of North Carolina-Greensboro
  • Rutgers University
9 Total References
Web References
Measured Progress Board: Alice Irby - Measured Progress
www.measuredprogress.com, 22 Aug 2014 [cached]
Alice Irby
Alice Irby earned a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro (UNC-G), and her master's degree from Duke University. After serving as director of admissions at UNC-G, Ms. Irby joined Education Testing Service (ETS). She also assisted in establishing the Jobs Corps during the Johnson administration.
In the 1970s, Ms. Irby became vice president for student services at Rutgers University, and then returned to ETS as vice president. In this capacity, she led eight field offices and oversaw legislative efforts in Washington. During the 1990s, Ms. Irby founded and was named chief executive officer of ETS's first operational subsidiary, The Chauncey Group International-an organization devoted to developing employment and professional licensing and certification examinations.
Since moving to Pinehurst, North Carolina, Ms. Irby has focused on her profession, higher education, and her local community. In addition to her consulting work and position on the board of directors at Measured Progress, Ms. Irby serves as resident of the Excellence Foundation at UNC-G, vice president of the Sandhills chapter of The English Speaking Union, and has been active in organizing educational programs for Phi Beta Kappa. She is currently president of the Village Chapel Foundation and most recently worked as treasurer for and advisor to a local councilwoman's election for town council.
...
Alice Irby
Leadership - Measured Progress
www.measuredprogress.com, 22 Aug 2014 [cached]
Alice Irby
Measured Progress - Senior Staff
www.asme.com, 22 April 2010 [cached]
Alice Irby
...
Alice Irby
Alice Irby earned a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro (UNC-G) She obtained her master's degree from Duke University. After serving as director of admissions at UNC-G, Ms. Irby joined Education Testing Service (ETS). She also assisted in establishing the Jobs Corps during the Johnson administration.
In the 1970s, Ms. Irby became vice president for student services at Rutgers University, and then returned to ETS as vice president, in which capacity she led eight field offices and oversaw legislative efforts in Washington. During the 1990s, Ms. Irby founded and was named chief executive officer of ETS's first operational subsidiary, The Chauncey Group International––an organization devoted to developing employment and professional licensing and certification examinations.
Since moving to Pinehurst, North Carolina, Ms. Irby has focused on her profession, higher education, and her local community. In addition to her consulting work and position on the board of directors at Measured Progress, Ms. Irby serves as resident of the Excellence Foundation at UNC-G, vice president of the Sandhills chapter of The English Speaking Union, and has been active in organizing educational programs for Phi Beta Kappa. She is currently president of the Village Chapel Foundation and most recently worked as treasurer for and advisor to a local councilwoman's election for town council.
Measured Progress | About Us
www.asme.com, 15 April 2011 [cached]
Alice Irby
Alice Irby earned a bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina-Greensboro (UNC-G) She obtained her master's degree from Duke University. After serving as director of admissions at UNC-G, Ms. Irby joined Education Testing Service (ETS). She also assisted in establishing the Jobs Corps during the Johnson administration.
In the 1970s, Ms. Irby became vice president for student services at Rutgers University, and then returned to ETS as vice president, in which capacity she led eight field offices and oversaw legislative efforts in Washington. During the 1990s, Ms. Irby founded and was named chief executive officer of ETS's first operational subsidiary, The Chauncey Group International--an organization devoted to developing employment and professional licensing and certification examinations.
Since moving to Pinehurst, North Carolina, Ms. Irby has focused on her profession, higher education, and her local community. In addition to her consulting work and position on the board of directors at Measured Progress, Ms. Irby serves as resident of the Excellence Foundation at UNC-G, vice president of the Sandhills chapter of The English Speaking Union, and has been active in organizing educational programs for Phi Beta Kappa. She is currently president of the Village Chapel Foundation and most recently worked as treasurer for and advisor to a local councilwoman's election for town council.
Alice Irby's academic journey ...
www.ourstate.com [cached]
Alice Irby's academic journey symbolizes an era of liberation for thousands of like-minded women at Woman's College in Greensboro.
Alice Irby Woman's College
Alice Irby did not cry. After her parents left her standing on the steps of Cotten Hall at Woman's College of the University of North Carolina on her first day as a college student, she could have been forgiven had she wept and clung to them.
It was not an easy time in America's history. The year was 1950 - the year President Truman ordered the building of the hydrogen bomb, the year McCarthy began hunting Communists, the year the Korean War began. And it was an era in which it was unusual for women to uproot themselves from their families, strike out on their own, and go to college.
But no, Alice did not cry. Alice was ecstatic.
She yearned to escape the farming fields of eastern North Carolina. She wanted to take courses that were unusual for women at the time - political science and economics. She considered Duke and WC, and WC won out because "not having boys around" would be more conducive to studying.
...
That evening, after her parents left, Alice raced to register for courses in the gymnasium, blindly signing up for professors whose reputations were unknown to her.
...
But Alice wasn't concerned with boys in her first year. Like other women at WC in Greensboro, she was on fire and ready to blaze new trails.
...
Alice and her friends sunbathed behind the dorms - out of public sight - and had food fights and ate ice cream at Yum Yum's and learned the rules of bridge. But Alice also passed out on her typewriter from exhaustion, pulled all-night study sessions with pots of coffee, knocked on her professors' doors with questions at dawn, and read stacks of books until her eyes crossed.
"It was a place of great opportunity," Alice says.
...
Alice learned early that discipline is a quality that marks successful people. At least, her mother certainly thought so. When Alice missed her curfew, she chopped block after block of wood - at 10 years old. When she said a bad word, especially darn, her mother washed out her mouth with red pepper. Respect and self-control were cemented into Alice's personality by the time she was a teenager.
Her family prided themselves on their gumption, too. Alice says her father was a "self-taught and self-made man," who opened his own furniture store before World War II. Her brother taught himself how to build a car at 16 years old. When it came time to choose a college, Alice's father told her to go wherever she wanted; he would find a way to pay.
Alice chose Woman's College, just like her mother. Alice loved the structure of the school, which required that students take two years of English, science or math, and history, and spend two years studying a foreign language. Freshmen weren't allowed off campus for the first six weeks of school. Alice befriended other women during the daily 6 p.m. dinner (students were assigned to sit with the same group for the entire semester), and they held competitions in Jackson Library to see who could read the most magazines.
Alice learned golf and archery. She gained entry into the prestigious honors society, The Golden Chain, and was part of the group that voted the first lesbian into the club - a decision administrators never questioned.
During her sophomore year, Alice married her longtime boyfriend, Claud. That year, 1951, marked the first time Alice petitioned for change. Since Claud had joined the Navy, Alice wanted to remain in the dorms, where married women were not allowed to live. She appealed the school's rule and won. And when her friends asked her why she was coming back to college - why didn't she want to stay at home and wait for her husband? - Alice replied, "To get an education."
And she did.
...
When class was out, Alice walked to Professor Warren Ashby's house to watch the news and discuss the political climate.
...
When Alice and her friends saw the famed writers, they struck up conversations.
...
In 1954, right before graduation, Alice and Mary were eating dinner at Sunset Restaurant when a friend ran up with a copy of a Greensboro newspaper.
...
But they didn't know the decision would alter the course for the university and inspire a decade of turbulence and change - much of which Alice would play a key role in.
•••
In 1959, Alice took a job as director of admissions at WC.
...
Smart, from Raleigh, was a fast learner who, unlike Alice, did not favor numbers or diagramming sentences.
...
Meanwhile, Alice was touring the state as the newly appointed director of admissions, searching for other black women who could succeed at WC.
...
Alice did not mince words with the chancellor. "If these young women are expelled from this university or college because of a permission slip when something major is going on, I just don't feel that I can remain here," she said.
...
Alice, still the director of admissions, backed the decision. Logically, she knew the integration was inevitable and made sense economically.
In 1963, men were admitted and the college's name officially changed to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. "Something was lost," Alice says. In a time when women were still treated as unequal, they'd lost something they could claim as their own.
•••
Alice, newly divorced, left in 1962 for Princeton, New Jersey, and joined the Educational Testing Service. She was promoted to executive, and later landed a job at Rutgers University as the vice president for student services, the first woman vice president at a major university. The New York Times wrote an article about the occasion and called her "the hard-working Mrs. Irby."
Her ambition came at a cost socially. Other mothers on the block didn't know how to relate to Alice, remembers her daughter, Andrea Irby.
...
Alice taught her to have confidence, and that if she worked hard enough, nothing was impossible.
...
Things were rarely easy for Alice. The IRS audited her frequently because the bureau couldn't believe a single mother made that much money. During her travels as an executive, Alice was once refused a seat on a plane because she was a woman. She held up the plane for hours, demanding a copy of the policy stating women couldn't fly on executive flights. When she returned home, Alice and a friend drew up a letter to United Airlines, threatening to sue for discrimination. United Airlines suspended the "executive flights" two months later.
In 1998, Alice retired and moved to Pinehurst. She grew closer to her fellow alumnae, especially Mary Bowers. Frequently, the women make trips back to campus and reminisce over their time at WC.
In October 2013, Alice and 29 other women gathered at UNCG for a dinner in their honor. The program was named "Women of Distinction. After Alice and the other women received a bouquet of yellow roses and standing ovations, Chancellor Linda Brady stepped to the podium.
...
I grew up in the same town as Alice Joyner Irby did. Her mother was my French teacher in high school. Her younger sister ,Margaret, was and still is a really good friend of mine. Alice Irby has always been an amazing individual; and I am so very proud of her many accomplishments. I thoroughly enjoyed the article about Alice that was in the North Carolina State magazine in the January 2014 edition. She is so deserving; and I'm sure anyone who has known Alice is proud of her also.
Other People with the name "Irby":
Other ZoomInfo Searches
Accelerate your business with the industry's most comprehensive profiles on business people and companies.
Find business contacts by city, industry and title. Our B2B directory has just-verified and in-depth profiles, plus the market's top tools for searching, targeting and tracking.
Atlanta | Boston | Chicago | Houston | Los Angeles | New York
Browse ZoomInfo's business people directory. Our professional profiles include verified contact information, biography, work history, affiliations and more.
Browse ZoomInfo's company directory. Our company profiles include corporate background information, detailed descriptions, and links to comprehensive employee profiles with verified contact information.
zirhbt201304