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Alfieri Maserati

Founder

Maserati Store

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Maserati Store

Vancouver, British Columbia,

Canada

Company Description

Discover Maserati Store: Style, Luxury and Exclusivity at Maserati Official Online Store. Buy Now Maserati Original Merchandise and Gadgets! ...more

Background Information

Employment History

Guerino Bertocchi


Affiliations

Officine Alfieri Maserati ,

Founder


MaseratiNet

Founder


Societ Anonima Officine Alfieri Maserati

Founder


Alfieri Maserati Workshop

Founder


Web References(22 Total References)


Classic Car Broker - Jaguar, Ferrari and Maserati Expertise - viathema.com

www.viathema.com [cached]

Alfieri Maserati, head of the Maserati brothers, behind the wheel of a Tipo 26
Alfieri Maserati behind the wheel of a Tipo 26 at the 1926 Targa Florio There were once six brothers in Italy who were artists. Their name was Maserati. One, Mario, worked with paints and canvas. The others made things out of metal. Fine things with fine engines in them that won races and the respect of all men who admire artistry no matter what form it may take. Of the five mechanically inclined brothers - Carlo, Bindo, Alfieri, Ettore, and Ernesto - three are still making cars as though they were making watches.


Maserati Classic & Collector Cars for Sale - viathema.com

www.viathema.com [cached]

We typically handle the following Maserati's
We buy, sell, broker, locate, consign and appraise exceptional classic, sports and collector Maserati's. Their name was Maserati. One, Mario, worked with paints and canvas. The others made things out of metal. Fine things with fine engines in them that won races and the respect of all men who admire artistry no matter what form it may take. Of the five mechanically inclined brothers - Carlo, Bindo, Alfieri, Ettore, and Ernesto - three are still making cars as though they were making watches. Bindo, Ernesto, and Ettore, however, no longer make the car that bears the family name. They work in Bologna in their hospital-clean, uncluttered shop, building a car called the O.S.C.A., which stands for Officine Specializzate Costruzioni Automobili. Alfieri Maserati, head of the Maserati brothers, behind the wheel of a Tipo 26 Alfieri Maserati behind the wheel of a Tipo 26 at the 1926 Targa Florio Maserati is the only marque that has ever been noticeably successful in both track racing and road racing. Twice it won at Indianapolis and has won at such roads circuits as Sebring, the Nurburgring and the Targa Florio. And, as befits an engine bearing Neptune's trident for a brand, Maserati has also set racing records on the water. But that is getting ahead of the story. Alfieri, the third brother, followed in Carlo's path as an Engineer and a racing driver. Ettore and Ernesto were also drivers and soon, with Bindo, they had grouped toghether in Bologna to build cars for racing. Their first triumph was a car that won its class in the 1925 Targa Florio, driven by Alfieri Maserati and Guerrino Bertocchi. Maserati was building mostly race cars - particularly there was a 1500 c.c. dual-supercharged engine and a three-liter in-line eight-cylinder engine, also with double-supercharging. As Maserati got back into racing, it found that its rear neighbour, Ferrari, was a chief competitor in both sports-racing car and single-seated Grand Prix cars. There were many close battles fought between the red-for-Italy cars. Maserati had on its roster a number of the world's best drivers. Stirling Moss got his start in Continental racing mounted on his own Maserati and he later joined the factory team. Juan Manuel Fangio won his last of many world championships driving for Maserati. The experience at Caracas was enough for Maserati. Not only had it lost the race and a number of cars, but the rules for racing the next year had been changed so that there was a three-liter limit on sports-car engines, ruling out the development of the 4.5 liter car. The factory quit racing. Not since then has Maserati officially raced, but that does not mean that the engineers were not working on new ideas, developing new engines; or that the factory did not assist private individuals who raced Maseratis. It did, and still does. At the Grand Prix of France at Rheims, in July 1957 one champion was getting his start - and in a Maserati too, the American Phil Hill. Five years later, in the season of 1961, Phil became the first American to win the world driving championship. In 1959, Maserati came up with a startlingly new automobile that went like the wind. Maserati also has built an engine for the Formula I Grand Prix car. Development on this model included the adoption of Girling disc brakes and in 1962 Lucas Fuel Injection was added and Maserati became the first Italian manufacturer to offer fuel injection on a production car: then came the two seater Sebring, a luxury car with Vignale body; four headlamps and Borrani knock-on-wheels. Citroen took over Maserati in 1969 and the SM went into production in 1970. The engine was a Maserati design, a V6 of 2670 cc. with 9 to 1 compression and 180 bhp. Fuel injection, adopted in 1972 increased output to 188. The Bora mid-engined coupe by Giugiaro went into production in 1970. The engine was a four cam Maserati engine developed by Alfieri and the Merak was derived from the Bora and used the SM V6 engine, increased to 2965 cc. With the fuel crisis demand for the Citroen SM fell and Peugeot who were now the owners of both Citroen and Maserati decided to close the factories and sack the 800 skilled workers. Alejandro De Tomaso who had always been a Maserati enthusiast and had raced a 150 S successfully in 1956, decided to try and save Maserati. At the end of 1975 control of Maserati passed from Citroen to De Tomaso and GEPI and is now making progress and re-establishing its position as a viable enterprise.


www.maseratistore.com

Maserati Store /  Publications /  MASERATI TIPO 26 - Alfieri Maserati 1926 Targa Florio
Publications MASERATI TIPO 26 - Alfieri Maserati 1926 Targa Florio Cod: 920002996 This print reproduces the founder of Maserati, Alfieri Maserati who designed the first Maserati in 1926: the Tipo 26 model and is important as this is the first Maserati vehicle. The Maserati Tipo 26 made its debut with Alfieri Maserati at the wheel in the famous Targa Florio and was the winner in its class.


www.euro-classic-photos.co.uk

Alfieri Maserati founded Maserati in the mid 1920's at Bologna.As the symbol for his new car he chose Neptune's Trident, the ancient symbol of Bologna and the location of his works factory. Click on the button below to download a PDF of his full magazine article.


www.allclassicads.com

Carlo, their first son, was born in 1881, Bindo in 1883 and Alfieri in 1885.
At just a few months old, Alfieri sadly passed away and his parents decided to name their next son, born in 1887, after him. Alfieri soon emerged as Carlo's spiritual heir, with the same extrovert personality and skills as a technician and driver. In the meantime, Bindo and Ettore had also joined Isotta Fraschini, where Alfieri had started out as a mechanic and progressed to driving. In 1912, after having represented the company in Argentina, the USA and Great Britain with his brother Ettore, Alfieri was put in charge of Isotta's customer service structure in Bologna. The wide-ranging experience he had built up during his career convinced Alfieri that he was ready to explore the possibility of going into business in his own right to exploit his talents and creativity to the fullest extent. In 1914 he rented office space in Via dé Pepoli, in Bologna's old town centre and this went on to become the first headquarters of the Società Anonima Officine Alfieri Maserati. Alfieri began his career as a racing driver and soon proved his worth, winning on the Susa-Moncenisio, the Mugello Circuit and the Aosta-Great Saint Bernard. Diatto offered him a chance to design cars for the company and even to race with them. Unfortunately, in 1924, after having dominated the San Sebastiano GP, he was disqualified for five years, even though he had retired, for having replaced the 2-litre engine in his car with a 3-litre unit. The penalty was lifted a few months later. Away from the racing world, Alfieri completely dedicated himself to the workshop and in 1926, after leaving Diatto, he produced the Tipo 26, the first all-Maserati car, and the first to sport the trident badge. The Tipo 26 won its class in its debut race, the Targa Florio, was driven by Alfieri Maserati himself. In 1927 Alfieri had a serious accident in the Messina Cup at the wheel of the Tipo 26B, after taking third place at the Targa Florio. In 1931 came the 4CTR and the front-wheel-drive 8C 2500, the last car to be designed by Alfieri Maserati, who died on 3 March, 1932. An enormous crowd attended his funeral in Bologna, including workers from the plant, famous drivers, and ordinary people, who all wanted to show their affection for the great man. Alfieri's death did not discourage the Maserati brothers; Bindo left Isotta Fraschini and returned to Bologna to continue the great venture began by Alfieri, alongside Ernesto and Ettore. That was when Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union began a sustained assault on the racing scene, making life difficult for Maserati in the more important races. The 6CM appeared, which gave Maserati the competitive edge in the voiturette class. During the Second World War, Maserati adapted its production accordingly, turning out machine tools, electrical components, spark plugs and electric vehicles, but returned to its original activities after the war, with a new GT car, the A6 1500. After several wins, life became less easy for Maserati in the 1950s as Alfa Romeo and Ferrari were extremely competitive. Colombo also laid the foundation for the Maserati 250F, which was later developed by Alfieri. In 1955 and 1956, Maserati won other important victories; in 1957 Fangio returned to Maserati and won the World Title for the fifth time - the first time for Maserati - with the 250F. Although the company announced its official retirement from racing that very year, it never withdrew from the scene completely because Maserati continued to build racing cars like the Birdcage and other prototypes for private teams, and to supply engines for the Formula 1 cars of other constructors, such as Cooper, for which it developed a 12-cylinder, three-valve engine with triple ignition in 1965. Production of the 3500 GT, which was launched in 1958, began at the start of an important new era for Maserati and consequently the plant had to be expanded. The Giugiaro-designed Bora, the first mass-produced mid-engined Maserati, was presented at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show; Maserati also built the occasional racing car engine, and that same year, a Citroën SM with a Maserati engine won the Morocco Rally. With the launch of the Merak and Khamsin, Maserati's production continued apace. But in 1973 the Yom Kippur War sparked the Oil Crisis, making life increasingly uncertain for the company, although it still had enough vitality to introduce both the Quattroporte II prototype, bodied by Bertone, and the Merak SS. The situation worsened, and on 23 May, Citroën announced that Maserati had gone into liquidation (the French car maker had signed an agreement with Peugeot but had lost interest in Maserati). Pressure from the industrialists' association and the local and provincial councils succeeded in persuading the government to intervene, and Maserati avoided closure by handing over control to GEPI (a government agency that financed companies in difficulty in order to save jobs). In an agreement signed on 8 August, 1975, most of the company's share capital was acquired by the Benelli company, and Alejandro De Tomaso, a former racing driver from Argentina who had also competed for Maserati, became Managing Director. The turning point for Maserati came in 1993, when the company's entire share capital was acquired by Fiat Auto. On 1 July, 1997 Fiat sold Maserati to Ferrari, and a new era began for the company. The following year, the new Spyder appeared, and was unveiled for the first time at the Frankfurt Motor Show, during which Maserati also announced its intention to return to the North American market. This decision was confirmed in January 2002, when the Coupé made its world debut at the Detroit Motor Show. Like the Spyder, it introduced a number of important innovations, from a new 4,200 cc 390-bhp V8 engine, to its suspension, chassis and F1-style gearbox. Besides returning to the most important markets with high-class and sophisticated models, Maserati also made a successful comeback to the world of racing thanks to the MC12 (in the FIA GT and ALMS championships), the Trofeo (in the single-make series for gentlemen drivers in Europe and Brazil) and the Trofeo Light (in the Italian GT and the Grand-Am). In September 2003 at the Frankfurt motorshow, the car that would be at the centre of Maserati's unstoppable growth was launched: the Maserati Quattroporte. The new Maserati saloon enjoyed immediate success in terms of sales and has also earned many prizes and widespread praise from clients, readers and journalists around the world. 2005 was a record year for Maserati, with 5,659 cars sold worldwide. This was an increase of 22.8% from the equally impressive 2004, and the natural confirmation of the measures taken in 1998, when only 518 vehicles were sold. Great satisfaction also came from Maserati's reparto corse. The incredible work of this team allowed Maserati to claim the Constructors' Cup and Team Vitaphone (Maserati) the team title. Maserati's one-two finish at the Spa 24 Hours was truly unforgettable. The Trofeo Light also secured a number of titles and wins, dominating the GT3 class of the Italian GT championship. The company's vitality is strengthened by the success of its single-make series, now into its fourth year in Europe and its third in Brazil. In early 2005, ownership of Maserati was transferred from Ferrari to Fiat, which allowed the two marques to achieve important industrial and commercial synergies with Alfa Romeo. Close technical and commercial collaboration within the group has provided Maserati with the impetus to position itself as the leader in its sector. It has also broadened its presence throughout the international markets thanks to models including the GranSport, the GranSport Spyder, and the MC Victory, developed to celebrate successes in the FIA GT series. In 2007, above all, Maserati's impressive performance was mainly thanks to the GranTurismo as the accounts once more showed a profit. Maserati continues to excel in the world of competition and recently claimed all four titles on offer in the GT1 Class of the 2007 FIA GT International championship, adding to the Manufacturers' Cup won in 2005 and continuing the winning trend following the Team and Drivers' titles from 2006.


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