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Albert Woodard

Owner

Business Computer Applications Inc

HQ Phone:  (770) 279-9774

Direct Phone: (678) ***-****direct phone

Email: a***@***.us

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Business Computer Applications Inc

2002 Perimeter Summit Blvd Suite 880

Atlanta, Georgia,30319

United States

Company Description

About BCA: Business Computer Applications (BCA), an Atlanta-based IT healthcare company that provides EMR and practice management systems, scheduling, and case management information systems among others. BCA currently serves 300 healthcare sites, 5,000 physic...more

Web References(46 Total References)


Atlanta's BCA Adds Veteran Healthcare IT Executive to Staff

www.prnation.org [cached]

"Healthcare is the fastest growing industry in the country and to keep pace companies involved in it are increasingly turning to information technology," says BCA CEO Albert Woodard.
"His background in electronic health records, health information exchanges and health analytics are valuable assets to BCA's current and future customers," adds Woodard. In his new position, which reports directly to Woodard, Green is responsible for Marketing, Business Development, Sales and Public Affairs. "Monty's experience in partnering with healthcare organizations to help meet their business goals and objectives by utilizing our technologies in this rapidly growing industry sector will be of great benefit to our existing and future customers," says Woodard.


www.intelledox.com

That is according to Business Computer Applications chief executive officer Albert Woodard, who says that medical professionals will have to begin searching for more efficient ways to operate in order to cope.


www.digitaljournal.com

ATLANTA, Feb. 12, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Hospitals, clinics and office-based physicians are increasingly turning to electronic medical records as they prepare for the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care (PPAHC) act, says Albert Woodard, CEO of Atlanta-based Business Computer Applications, a company devoted to digitizing medical records.
"Medical practitioners are bracing for a triple whammy as, in addition to the PPAHC, they are also facing a wave of retiring baby boomers coupled with a predicted shortage of qualified medical staff," says Woodard. Some 80 million aging baby boomers are landing on Medicare roles at a rate of 7,000 a day according to AARP; the PPAHC is expected to flood the system with another 32 million patients; and a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services forecast says health care staff shortages will worsen in 2014. "The strain all of this will put on our health care system is enormous," says Woodard, "thus forcing medical providers to search for more efficient and effective methods to operate their practices." Woodard singled out a December 2012 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicating that across the U.S. office-based physicians are increasingly turning to electronic medical records (EMRs). "EMRs can aid in improving quality of care, reduce errors and increase efficiency by making patients' medical history accessible to anybody who treats them," he says. "As we move through 2013 we will see more marriages between computers and healthcare in physician's office, hospitals and clinics as information technology continues to move from the billing departments and other back office functions into the examining room," says Woodard. "EMRs can help reduce errors, provide better access to health information, improve care coordination, save millions of dollars and alleviate a shortage of qualified healthcare professionals," says Woodard.


www.pharmafocusasia.com

ATLANTA, Feb. 12, 2013 -- Hospitals, clinics and office-based physicians are increasingly turning to electronic medical records as they prepare for the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care (PPAHC) act, says Albert Woodard, CEO of Atlanta-based Business Computer Applications, a company devoted to digitizing medical records.  Â
"Medical practitioners are bracing for a triple whammy as, in addition to the PPAHC, they are also facing a wave of retiring baby boomers coupled with a predicted shortage of qualified medical staff," says Woodard. Some 80 million aging baby boomers are landing on Medicare roles at a rate of 7,000 a day according to AARP; the PPAHC is expected to flood the system with another 32 million patients; and a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services forecast says health care staff shortages will worsen in 2014. "The strain all of this will put on our health care system is enormous," says Woodard, "thus forcing medical providers to search for more efficient and effective methods to operate their practices." Woodard singled out a December 2012 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicating that across the U.S. office-based physicians are increasingly turning to electronic medical records (EMRs). "EMRs can aid in improving quality of care, reduce errors and increase efficiency by making patients' medical history accessible to anybody who treats them," he says. "EMRs can help reduce errors, provide better access to health information, improve care coordination, save millions of dollars and alleviate a shortage of qualified healthcare professionals," says Woodard.


www.prweb.com

Hospitals, clinics and office-based physicians are no different than any other business across the country as they prepare for the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care (PPAHC) act says Albert Woodard, CEO of Atlanta-based Business Computer Applications, a company devoted to digitizing medical records.
"Unlike a retail or service company though, medical practitioners are bracing for a triple whammy as, in addition to the PPAHC, they are also facing a wave of retiring baby boomers coupled with a predicted shortage of qualified medical staff," says Some 80 million aging baby boomers are landing on Medicare roles at a rate of 7,000 a day according to AARP ; the PPAHC is expected to flood the system with another 32 million patients; and a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services forecast says health care staff shortages will worsen in 2014. "The strain all of this will put on our health care system is enormous," says Woodard, "thus forcing medical providers to search for more efficient and effective methods to operate their practices." Woodard singled out a December 2012 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicating that across the U.S. office-based physicians are increasingly turning to electronic medical records (EMRs). "EMRs can aid in improving quality of care, reduce errors and increase efficiency by making patients' medical history accessible to anybody who treats them," he says. "I've experienced how health care providers throughout the U.S - ranging from non-profit clinics and private practices to hospitals and correctional healthcare systems - are using EMRs to help reduce errors, provide better access to health information, improve care coordination, save millions of dollars and alleviate a shortage of qualified healthcare professionals," says Woodard.


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