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Wrong Al Piccirillo?

Al Piccirillo

Program Director

Air Force magazine

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Air Force magazine

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Background Information

Employment History

Colonel

U.S. Air Force


Program Manager

U.S. Air Force


Web References(5 Total References)


www.airspacemag.com

Al Piccirillo became the program director for the Air Force's Advanced Tactical Fighter project in 1984."The B-2 was there and the ATF was in development," he says."The feeling was that we had moved beyond the F-117, and the big effort was to fix what was wrong."The new jet had quite a lot wrong.The onboard computers did not have enough processing power.A rudder weakness limited speed.And maintenance was "a nightmare," says Piccirillo.Piccirillo now says, "1988 was when we started to get some real capability" in the F-117.


www.popsci.com [cached]

"The analogy with the F-16XL is very good," says Al Piccirillo, the first U.S. Air Force program manager for the Advanced Tactical Fighter, which became the F-22.The F-16XL ultimately lost out to a bomber version of the F-15 and never went into production, but many military and industry experts think it was one of the best warplanes that the U.S. Air Force never bought.Could the FB-22 be the phoenix that rises on the ashes of that abandoned project?Piccirillo, for one, thinks it's conceivable. How might the FB-22 be used in action?Its ability to fly high and fast, combined with its radar-detection and bombing capabilities, would enable it to work in concert with other planes to accomplish dangerous missions.In one scenario developed by Lockheed Martin, a fleet of F-35 fighters and B-2 bombers are headed for their targets-say, a munitions factory-but they must traverse a belt of surface-to-air missile sites to get there.Though the F-35 and B-2 are both stealthy-designed to evade detection-they can be identified by some of the largest and most powerful radars.The strategy, then, is to send ahead a few FB-22s to take out the enemy's anti-aircraft missiles, clearing the path for the other planes.


www.cdi.org [cached]

Al Piccirillo Al Piccirillo, Colonel, US Air Force (Ret.) and F-22 Program Manager, 1983-1987U.S. Air Force


www.airspacemag.com

Piccirillo now says, "1988 was when we started to get some real capability" in the F-117.Al Piccirillo became the program director for the Air Force's Advanced Tactical Fighter project in 1984."The B-2 was there and the ATF was in development," he says."The feeling was that we had moved beyond the F-117, and the big effort was to fix what was wrong."The new jet had quite a lot wrong.The onboard computers did not have enough processing power.A rudder weakness limited speed.And maintenance was "a nightmare," says Piccirillo.Piccirillo now says, "1988 was when we started to get some real capability" in the F-117.


www.airspacemag.com

Al Piccirillo became the program director for the Air Force's Advanced Tactical Fighter project in 1984."The B-2 was there and the ATF was in development," he says."The feeling was that we had moved beyond the F-117, and the big effort was to fix what was wrong."The new jet had quite a lot wrong.The onboard computers did not have enough processing power.A rudder weakness limited speed.And maintenance was "a nightmare," says Piccirillo.Al Piccirillo became the program director for the Air Force's Advanced Tactical Fighter project in 1984."The B-2 was there and the ATF was in development," he says."The feeling was that we had moved beyond the F-117, and the big effort was to fix what was wrong."The new jet had quite a lot wrong.The onboard computers did not have enough processing power.A rudder weakness limited speed.And maintenance was "a nightmare," says Piccirillo.Piccirillo now says, "1988 was when we started to get some real capability" in the F-117.


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