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Al Newell

President

Newell and Associates

Email: a***@***.com

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Newell and Associates

7201 Scott Padgett Pkwy

Concord, North Carolina,28027

United States

Company Description

We desire to be an organization that is transparent and that our teachings and lives that are seen by those we serve will be the same as the one you don't see. That does not mean that we don't sin or that we haven't made many mistakes in life. We are saved by ...more

Background Information

Employment History

National Director of Volunteers

Compassion International Inc


Affiliations

Compassion International's National Volunteer Network

Founder


High Impact Volunteer Ministry Development

Founder


Web References(19 Total References)


Our Team

www.newellandassociates.com [cached]

Al Newell :
Al Newell Al co-founded Newell and Associates with his wife Wendy in 1992. Al is the author of High Impact Volunteer Ministry Development. He started Compassion International's National Volunteer Network and Compassion Sunday. Al has partnered with Operation Christmas Child in developing High Impact in the U.S., and across the globe. By God's amazing grace, leaders from over 100 countries have implemented High Impact. A graduate and former adjunct at Denver seminary, Al taught High Impact as a requirement for M.A. in leadership. His Clientele ranges from worldwide organizations like Samaritan's Purse, Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, Prison Fellowship, Precept Ministries Int'l, Family Life and large and local churches. Wendy co-founded Newell and Associates: High Impact Volunteer Ministry Development with her husband Al in 1992. Wendy and Al have been married for 35 years and have three adult children and four grandchildren. Al and Wendy Newell and team have had a tremendous impact on our Operation Christmas Child volunteer program. Al's leadership has helped us recruit, train, and equip thousands of volunteers around the country and encouraged an environment where they can grow in their relationship with Christ and be more effective for our ministry of blessing millions of children worldwide.


Our Staff

www.newellandassociates.com [cached]

Al Newell :
Al Newell Al founded Newell and Associates High Impact Volunteer Ministry in 1992 together with his wife Wendy. Prior to that Al started and developed volunteer ministries for 12 years including starting and developing Compassion International's National Advocate Network and Compassion Sunday. Al, a graduate and former adjunct at Denver Seminary has served as an Executive Pastor and Elder. Al and Wendy were married have been married for over 30 yrs. Wendy co-founded Newell and Associates with Al in 1992. Al and Wendy were married have been married for over 30 yrs.


Newell & Associates: High Impact Ministry Development

www.newellandassociates.com [cached]

Newell and Associates High Impact Volunteer Ministry was founded in 1992 by Al and Wendy Newell.
Al Newell Together with his wife Wendy, Al founded Newell and Associates High Impact Volunteer Ministry in 1992. Prior to that Al started and developed volunteer ministries for 12 years including Compassion International's National Advocate Network and Compassion Sunday. For 19 years Al has consulted with leaders from many of the world's largest Christian Organizations like Samaritan's Purse Operation Christmas Child, OMF, MOPs, many Rescue ministries and churches like: Westminster Chapel, McGregor Baptist and Calvary Worship Center. High Impact trainings have been conducted on every continent with leaders from over 100 countries. Al, a graduate and former adjunct at Denver Seminary has served as an Executive Pastor and Elder. Al and Wendy have been married 31 years and have three grown children that are married and three grandchildren. Wendy founded Newell and Associates with Al in 1992.


gablind.com

Edgar Newell then hired his son Allan to run Newell Manufacturing and started a new company, Newell Manufacturing Company Ltd. (Newell Ltd.), in Prescott, Canada. Established to capitalize on Ogdensburg's location, which made shipments south costly and left Canadian distribution channels more financially attractive, Newell Ltd. purchased a small dockside building in Prescott.
Throughout Newell Manufacturing's second decade, increasing managerial authority was given to Allan Newell, although Edgar Newell retained all voting shares of both Newell companies. Allan Newell received a 64 percent share in Newell Ltd., and Cuthbert received 33 percent of Newell Manufacturing and 20 percent of Newell Ltd. Allan Newell was named chairman and president of Newell Manufacturing but bowed out of active affairs with the company, opting for a political life that eventually led him to the New York State Assembly. Before the 1930s drew to a close a number of officer changes were made: Cuthbert was named to succeed Allan Newell as president of Newell Manufacturing and Ferguson was named president of Western Newell, although Allan Newell remained president of Newell Ltd. and chairman of all three companies. Before the 1930s drew to a close a number of officer changes were made: Cuthbert was named to succeed Allan Newell as president of Newell Manufacturing and Ferguson was named president of Western Newell, although Allan Newell remained president of Newell Ltd. and chairman of all three companies. During the early 1960s Newell acquired the rights to additional drapery hardware brands and names, including Angevine and Silent Gliss. During the 1970s Newell continued to acquire other companies, greatly expanding its product line in the process. In 1968 Newell purchased a majority interest in Mirra-Cote Industries, a manufacturer of plastic bath accessories. In 1969 Newell acquired Dorfile Manufacturing Company, a maker of household shelving, and E.H. Tate Company, which brought the "Bulldog" line of picture hanging hardware into the Newell line of products. During the late 1960s DRACO began phasing out of manufacturing operations and finally closed its doors in the early 1970s. In 1970 the company was reincorporated in Delaware as Newell Companies, Inc. The following year Newell added sewing and knitting accessories to its product line when it acquired The Boye Needle Company, a Chicago-based world leader in knitting needles and crochet hooks, and Novel Ideas, Inc., another maker of do-it-yourself sewing materials. In April 1972 Newell went public as an over-the-counter stock and that same year initiated an acquisition strategy that would later be replayed in various forms. Newell made an offer to buy EZ Paintr Corporation, a paint and sundries company in which Newell already had a 25 percent stake, and EZ Paintr in turn filed a pair of lawsuits to fight back against a possible takeover. But in February 1973 Newell gained majority control of EZ Paintr after its president and cofounder agreed to sell his family's interest in the paint supply company, a move opposed by EZ Paintr's management. By March 1973 Newell had ousted the EZ Paintr board and Daniel Ferguson had become president of the company, which yielded complete control of its stock to Newell six months later. By March 1973 Newell had ousted the EZ Paintr board and Daniel Ferguson had become president of the company, which yielded complete control of its stock to Newell six months later. In 1974 Newell completed another drawn-out acquisition and purchased complete control of Mirra-Cote. Between 1976 and 1978 Newell expanded its shelving, paint, and sundries offerings and acquired Royal Oak Industries, Inc., Baker Brush Company, and Dixon Red Devil Ltd. (later renamed Dixon Applicators). During the same period the company sold some of its knitting products businesses, including Novel Ideas. In May 1978 Newell acquired 24 percent of the financially troubled BernzOmatic Corporation, a manufacturer of propane torches and other do-it-yourself hand tools. In February 1979 Newell gained operational control over BernzOmatic after its president, who had earlier sold convertible debentures to Newell, yielded his position to Ferguson and Newell had taken control of the smaller firm's board. In February 1979 Newell gained operational control over BernzOmatic after its president, who had earlier sold convertible debentures to Newell, yielded his position to Ferguson and Newell had taken control of the smaller firm's board. In June 1979, after coming off of its first $100 million sales year, Newell began trading on the New York Stock Exchange. About the same time Newell began targeting a new customer base--the emerging mass merchandisers such as Kmart--in order to piggyback on the increasing popularity of such stores. 1980s: Accelerating the Pace of Acquisition and the Newellization Process Newell entered the 1980s riding on the growth of mass merchandisers while continuing to expand and complement its product line through acquisitions. Between 1980 and 1981 Newell acquired the drapery hardware division of The Stanley Works and Brearley Co., a manufacturer of bathroom scales. In April 1982 Newell acquired complete control of BernzOmatic and in December of that year entered into a $60 million financing and stock purchase agreement with Western Savings & Loan Association, with the S&L paying $18.4 million for a 20 percent stake in Newell, which it gradually sold off to private investors during the next five years. Through two separate stock deals worth more than $42 million, in 1983 Newell acquired Mirro Corporation, a maker of aluminum cookware and baking dishes. In May 1984 Newell increased its number of common stock shares from 14 million to 50 million and later that year through a stock swap acquired Foley-ASC, Inc., a maker of cookware and kitchen accessories. In May 1985 the company changed its name to Newell Co. In June 1985 Newell acquired a 20 percent stake in William E. Wright Company from a group dissenting from the majority, including three board members and the grandson of Wright Company's founder. A few months later Newell raised its stake in Wright, a maker of sewing notions, and by the end of the year Newell had obtained majority control of the company and ousted Wright's board and top officers. In October 1986 Newell acquired the assets of Enterprise Aluminum, the aluminum cookware division of Lancaster Colony Corporation. By 1987 Newell had acquired complete control of Wright, which was added to a list of about 30 acquisitions the company had logged since Ferguson had become president. In July 1987 Newell--true to its acquisition formula--paid $330 million to acquire control of Anchor Hocking Corporation and its targeted glassware operations. At the time of the acquisition Anchor, with $758 million in sales, had nearly double the annual revenues of Newell and provided its new parent with brand-name tabletop glassware, decorative cabinet hardware, and microwave cookware, with each product line holding a number one or two position in its respective market. Within a week after the takeover Newell began employing its usual post-acquisition strategy on a large scale, dismissing 110 Anchor employees and closing its West Virginia plant. Through this strategy, which became known as "Newellization," Newell aimed to boost the profitability of acquired companies by improving customer service and partnerships, reducing overhead costs by centralizing administrative functions, abandoning underperforming product lines, and reducing inventory. Acquired companies continued to be "Newellized" into the early 21st century. Between 1988 and 1989 Newell acquired several small companies that made bakeware, paint sundries, metal closures, cabinet hardware, and aluminum cookware, and sold its Carr-Lowrey specialty glass container business and its William E. Wright/ Boye Needle home-sewing business. In 1989 Newell unsuccessfully tried to buy a 20-plus percent investment in Vermont American, a maker of consumer and industrial tools that turned to another suitor after suggesting Newell would be a disruptive force in its operations. Newell closed its books on the 1980s having achieved a number of significant financial accomplishments. Between 1987 and 1989 the company's income rose more than $48 million, while during the course of the entire decade sales spiraled from $138 million to $1.12 billion as income ballooned from $7.8 million to $85.3 million. Newell also was listed number 22 on the Forbes list of the best stocks of the 1980s, having provided a total return to stockholders that averaged 39.5 percent per year. Early 1990s: Expanding into Office Products and Picture Frames Newell entered the 1990s as a market leader in electronic data interchange, a computer-to-computer system that allowed Newell customers to place orders electronically. Attempting to once again piggyback on a growing mass merchandiser market--namely the trend to sell office supplies through mass retailers--in 1991 Newell entered the office products business by acquiring two small firms, Keene Manufacturing, Inc., and W.T. Rogers Company. In 1991 Newell also increased its interests in hardware firms and agreed to invest $150 million in the Black & Decker Corporation in a stock deal giving Newell a 15 percent stake in the hardware company. (The following year Newell backed away from a move to purchase a 15 percent interest in another hardware manufacturer, Stanley Works, which had filed an antitrust suit against Newell.) In 1991 Newell also acquired a 6 percent stake in the Ekco Group Inc., a maker of houseware products, kitchen tools, and bakeware, which was later sold. In 1992 Newell became a major force in the office products market. It acquired both Sanford Corporation, a leading producer of felt-tipped pens, plastic desk accessories, storage boxes, and other office and school supplies, and Stuart Hall Company, Inc., a well-known stationery and school supply business, in two stock swaps totaling more than $600 million. The two businesses combined brought Newell's annual office products sales to $350 million. The year 1992 also saw Newell--in what some perceived as a return to its roots--acquire Intercraft Industries, Inc., the largest supplier of picture frames in the United States. Although the company had another Ferguson in line to run Newell, by 1992 stock dilution had reduced insider control of the company to 15 percent. Nevertheless, four members of the 11-person board were members of the Ferguson, Cuthbert, or Newell families. 1993-98: Acquisition Spree of Nearly $2 Billion Having already completed more than 50 acquisitions from the late 1960s through 1992, Newell completed a dizzying series of deals from 1993 through 1998. The company spent about $1.9 billion on acquisitions during this period, completing 18 major acquisitions that added about $2.6 billion in annual revenues to Newell's coffers. Three key deals were consummated in 1993. In April, Sunnyvale, California-based Levolor Corp. was acquired for $72.5 million, giving Newell a leading maker of window blinds that had 1992 sales of $180 million. Then in September Newell bought Lee/Rowan Co., based in St. Louis, Missouri, for $73.5 million, gaining a leading manufacturer of wire storage and organization products with $100 million in 1992 revenues; Lee/Rowan fit in quite well alongside Newell's Dorfile hardware and shelving brand. Two months later Newell spent $147.1 million for Goody Products Inc., which was based in Kearny, New Jersey. With sales in 1992 of about $218 million, Goody produced hair care accessories, such as brushes, barrettes, and ponytail holders, as well as Ace combs; Goody also produced OptiRay sunglasses, but Newell sold that business to Benson Eyecare Corporation in January 1994. Rounding out its window treatments portfolio, Newell in August 1994 acquired Home Fashions Inc., based in Westminster, California. Achieving revenues of $140 million in 1993, Home Fashions produced window coverings, including vertical blinds and pleated shades, under the Del Mar and LouverDrape brand names. In a similar move, the office products operations were bolstered through the October 1994 purchase of Faber-Castell Corporation, which specialized in pencils and rolling-ball pens under the Eberhard Faber and Uni-Ball names. One month later, Newell spent $86 million to acquire Corning Incorporated's European consumer products business, which had 1993 revenues of $130 million. This deal included manufacturing facilities in England, France, and Germany; the trademark rights and product lines for Corning's Pyrex, Pyroflam, and Visions cookware brands in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa; and Corning's consumer distribution network in these areas. Newell also became the distributor of Corning's U.S.-made cookware and dinnerware products, including the Revere Ware and Corelle brands, in these same regions. This acquisition gave Newell its first major overseas foothold. Newell gained a virtual stranglehold on the picture frame market with the acquisitions of Decorel Incorporated in October 1995 and HolsonBurnes Group, Inc. in January 1996. Decorel, which had sales of more than $100 million in 1994, was the third largest U.S. maker of picture frames but also gave Newell entry into the framed-art business. North Smithfield, Rhode Island-based HolsonBurnes was acquired for $33.5 million and was the number two frame supplier in the country, behind Newell itself. Its brands included Burnes of Boston photo frames, sold mainly to department stores and specialty stores, and Holson photo albums, which were distributed through mass merchandisers and discounters. Revenues in 1994 for HolsonBurnes totaled $130 million. Newell also gained a stronger position in writing instruments by purchasing Berol Corporation in November 1995. Among Berol's products were graphite and coloring pencils, and its 1994 sales exceeded $200 million. Concluding its heaviest one-year spending spree yet, Newell spent $563.5 million to complete four major deals during 1997. Office products were the subject of two of the acquisitions, the March purchase of the Rolodex brand from Insilco Corporation and the June buyout of the office products business of Rubbermaid. Under the Rolodex brand, which generated about $68 million in 1996 revenues, were such products as card files, personal organizers, and paper punches. With 1996 sales of $162 million, the Rubbermaid unit produced desk and computer accessories, chairmats, resin-based office furniture, and storage and organization products under the Eldon and MicroComputer Accessories brands. In May 1997 Newell bought the Kirsch brand from Cooper Industries, Inc., thereby gaining the leading producer of decorative window hardware in the country, with annual sales in excess of $250 million. Then in August 1997 Newell acquired two subsidiaries of American Greetings Corporation: Acme Frame Products, Inc., producer of picture frames, and Wilhold Inc., maker of hair care accessory products. Newell acquired a Brazilian maker of aluminum cookware, Panex S.A. Industria e Comercio, in June. In September the company purchased another German firm, Hamburg-based Rotring Group, which had 1997 sales of $280 million. Rotring produced writing instruments, drawing instruments, and art materials under the Rotring, Koh-I-Noor, Grumbacher, and Accent brands; it also owned a subsidiary called Cosmolab Inc. that specialized in color cosmetic pencils. Newell spent $413.3 million on its 1998 acquisitions; the company also sold off its Stuart Hall business and the plastics division of Anchor Hocking that year. The steady stream of acquisitions paid off for Newell in the form of record earnings of $396.2 million and record revenues of $3.72 billion for 1998. The earnings figure was more than four and a half times the level of 1989, while sales had more than tripled during the same period. For the ten-year period ending in 1998, Newell's compound annual growth rates for sales and earnings per share were 13 percent and 16 percent, respectively. Starting with the 1994 purchase of the European consumer products unit of Corning, Newell had made a concerted overseas push; as a result, sales outside the United States increased from 8 percent of total sales in 1992 to 22 percent in 1998. It was from this position of strength that Newell announced in October 1998 by far its largest acquisition ever: the $6 billion purchase of Rubbermaid that would be consummated in March 1999. But Rubbermaid also divested its office products division by selling it to Newell for $246.5 million in May 1997. By late 1998, however, Rubbermaid's position had deteriorated to the point where it gave in on these points and agreed to be bought by Newell for $6 billion in stock.


Newell and Associates | Level 2: The Advanced Executive Course

www.newellandassociates.com [cached]

Al Newell is founder of Newell & Associates, a volunteer management consulting ministry.
For the last 24 years, Al has specialized in starting and developing volunteer ministries in churches and Christian organizations. Al was founder and director of Compassion International's National Volunteer Network, which brings in millions of dollars to Compassion each year. A graduate and former adjunct professor of Denver Seminary, Al has served as Executive Pastor and Director of Ministries implementing the High Impact model in local churches. His clientele includes both local and international Christian ministries, as well as large and small churches throughout the United States. Joining Al in training are other consultants and members of the Newell & Associates team Dina Parris, Dave Newell, Becky Coleman and Ruth Mott.


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