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Wrong Samir Ahmed?

Samir A. Ahmed

Principal Investigator

Oklahoma State U.

Email: s***@***.edu

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Oklahoma State U.

Background Information

Employment History

Professor of Transportation Systems and Engineering

Transportation Technology Center , Inc.


Professor of Civil Engineering and Principal Investigator for the Study

Oklahoma State University


Médecins Sans Frontières


Web References(58 Total References)


ET's Bike Safer Blog

www.bikesafer.com [cached]

Our conversation with Dr. Samir Ahmed, the Principal Investigator at Oklahoma State U., suggests that they might be able to get a total of 400 crashes studied, more than the LA Times suggests, and it is possible that future highway funding legislation might include additional funds.


ET's Bike Safer Blog

www.bikesafer.com [cached]

The penny has pretty much dropped on the OSU 'researchers', and we think that, even if they produced a study, that it would achieve little traction, as Ahmed and Tree have lost all credibility in the motorcycling world.
We have been enthusiastic supporters of the ill-fated OSU study, which has been accursed by an evil politician, Daniel Inhofe, who gave the study as pork to OSU, and and incompetent chief investigator, Dr. Samir Ahmed. The non-motorcycle-rider Dr. Ahmed has been reported in recent weeks to be on tenterhooks awaiting the result of last week's MSF meeting, where the final touches were made to this policy. He was expecting MSF to restore the funding they withheld from his study, and will no doubt take this development as a kick in the teeth. He can now get back to 'proving' that a 300-sample study is as good as a 900 to 1200 sample study, and whining about his expense account. We briefly air the study sample size issue and challenged Dr. Ahmed to demonstrate his knowledge of the literature and basic bike skills. They confirmed the rack rate as specified by Dr. Ahmed, but Mr Ouellet did not return the call. But surely I should be able to rely on information provided by a prominent academic like Dr Ahmed? I'm going to be charitable and assume that he was somehow misinformed, and also has a bad memory about what he said on the phone. This is important information that goes to the core of his assignment with the Crash Causation Study and he should have known what he was talking about. I'll take his comment today as an expression of annoyance about my asking him for information, and I'll hope he's a lot more careful with his facts in the crash study. This story from Examiner.com from last week reveals that Dr Ahmed, the study Principal Investigator, is now working on some statistics to prove that the 300 number will be OK. (We can confirm the Examiner story from our own sources) This is ludicrous on the face of it. The workings of the 'chi-squared' test make it impossible to predict which data will be further studied to see which of the almost 2000 crash data items are important in causing -and preventing - crashes. These might be items like ABS, running lights, HID headlights, which might prove effective in preventing crashes if present in sufficient numbers in the population sample. As we don't know what these numbers will be, we can't predict the outcome of the 'chi-squared' test done on these data at the 300 and at the 900 level. No statistical calculations can override this presumption. On the other hand, Dr Ahmed, the Principal Investigator from OSU, is on record, in this LA Times article from July 2007, by the prescient Susan Carpenter, as saying "900 is the least we consider adequate from a statistical point of view.". Right on, Dr. A, you were right first time. Dr Ahmed of OSU seemed similarly frustrated. He is doing a statistical analysis to see if 300 crashes will work, but in this 2007 LA Times article he was pretty clear that 900 is needed, as most experts agree. When pressed on the issue of why this study is costing so much more than Maids or Hurt, he points out that both these other studies used the cheap labor of research students. OSU is contracting out the work to professional accident investigation businesses, like Dynamic Science Inc, which provided the researchers for the pilot study. Additional consultancy and quality analysis was done by other accident investigators. Dr Ahmed refused to identify the consultants or what is being paid to them or to Dynamic Science, pointing out that the contracts specify confidentiality on these matters. Dr Ahmed also points out that although OSU is not a motorcycle research specialist, since USC closed down Hurt's department, there are no specialist university motorcycle research departments anywhere in the US, so they are as good as any. We understand the temptation for Dr Ahmed to use these readily available, but expensive, experts to make up for his lack of previous experience. And the project personnel currently recognized for the OSU study are Dr. Ahmed and three researchers from Dynamic Research, Inc., a much smaller effort than Hurt's 29-person team. Dr. Samir Ahmed, reportedly, was unhappy at being stumped with the project. The OSU Transportation Center is known for road infrastructure research. Our conversation with Dr. Samir Ahmed, the Principal Investigator at Oklahoma State U., suggests that they might be able to get a total of 400 crashes studied, more than the LA Times suggests, and it is possible that future highway funding legislation might include additional funds.


BIKE LAW 101- What Do MAIDS Have to do With MOTORCYCLES??? | Steve Magas Ohio's Bike Lawyer

www.ohiobikelawyer.com [cached]

The LA Times quoted Samir Ahmed, the Oklahoma State University engineering professor who is directing the US study as stating, "900 is the least we consider adequate from a statistical point of view.


Student Chapters - MOVITE

www.movite.org [cached]

Samir A. Ahmed, Ph.D.
Professor School of Civil & Environmental Engineering Oklahoma State University


Editorials | Motorcycle Safety News

motorcyclesafetynews.com [cached]

The Federal Highway Administration has undertaken a comprehensive study at the Oklahoma Transportation Center, an independent and well-respected transportation research facility at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, Okla., under the direction of Dr. Samir Ahmed.


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