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James Aguer

Anti-Slavery International

HQ Phone:  +44 20 7501 8920

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I agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. I understand that I will receive a subscription to ZoomInfo Community Edition at no charge in exchange for downloading and installing the ZoomInfo Contact Contributor utility which, among other features, involves sharing my business contacts as well as headers and signature blocks from emails that I receive.

Anti-Slavery International

Thomas Clarkson House The Stableyard, Broomgrove Road

London, Greater London,SW9 9TL

United Kingdom

Company Description

Anti-Slavery International is the world's oldest international human rights organization, founded in 1839. It is the only charity in the United Kingdom to work exclusively against slavery and related abuses. We work at local, national and international levels ...more

Web References(18 Total References)


Anti-Slavery - James Aguer

www.antislaveryinternational.org [cached]

James Aguer
Anti-Slavery - James Aguer James Aguer portrait of James Aguer James Aguer, chair of the Dinka Committee James Aguer, chair of the Dinka Committee, is being presented with the 2006 Anti-Slavery Award for his work against slavery in Sudan. Since the late-1980s, James has been actively involved in seeking, identifying and securing the release of Dinka children and women abducted from their homes in Southern Sudan and forced into slavery. During the civil war between the Sudan Government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army, which raged from 1983 to 2005, conflict, raids and abductions in the Bahr-el-Ghazal region were carried out by government-backed militias, leading to the enslavement of over 14,000 men, women and children between 1986 and 2002. James is himself a member of the Dinka people, the main ethnic group from which thousands were abducted and enslaved during the conflict. Originally from the South, James moved to the capital Khartoum in the mid-1980s after the outbreak of violence. The violence involved raids by Arabic-speaking militia, the Murhaleen, who looted, killed, destroyed property, and abducted women and children and forced them into slavery. In response to these atrocities, James and some fellow activists within the Dinka community decided to work to secure the release of those who had been enslaved. To achieve this, he and five colleagues established the Dinka Committee in September 1989. The work was extremely dangerous and, initially, unsupported. For many years the Government of Sudan rejected allegations of slavery and targeted those campaigning against it. As a result, James has been arrested over 30 times and imprisoned on many occasions. From the beginning James and the Dinka Committee have been closely involved in the work of the CEAWC. Since it was founded, the Dinka Committee has secured the release of over 4,000 people. Throughout this time James has been personally involved in regular visits to the areas where abductees are kept and in negotiating for their release and repatriation with local leaders, government bodies, NGOs and international bodies. He has used his own home in Khartoum as a reception centre for released and escaped children and adults believed to have relatives in the area with whom they could be reunited. Now is a critical time for James and his work.


Anti-Slavery - James Aguer's Anti-Slavery Award acceptance speech

www.antislaveryinternational.org [cached]

James Aguer 2006 Anti-Slavery Award acceptance speech


Anti-Slavery - 2006 Award winner

www.antislavery.org.uk [cached]

James Aguer
James Aguer, chair of the Dinka Committee, is being presented with the 2006 Anti-Slavery Award for his work against slavery in Sudan. Since the late-1980s, James has been actively involved in seeking, identifying and securing the release of Dinka children and women abducted from their homes in Southern Sudan and forced into slavery. During the civil war between the Sudan Government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army, which raged from 1983 to 2005, conflict, raids and abductions in the Bahr-el-Ghazal region were carried out by government-backed militias, leading to the enslavement of over 14,000 men, women and children between 1986 and 2002. James is himself a member of the Dinka people, the main ethnic group from which thousands were abducted and enslaved during the conflict. Originally from the South, James moved to the capital Khartoum in the mid-1980s after the outbreak of violence. The violence involved raids by Arabic-speaking militia, the Murhaleen, who looted, killed, destroyed property, and abducted women and children and forced them into slavery. In response to these atrocities, James and some fellow activists within the Dinka community decided to work to secure the release of those who had been enslaved. To achieve this, he and five colleagues established the Dinka Committee in September 1989. The work was extremely dangerous and, initially, unsupported. For many years the Government of Sudan rejected allegations of slavery and targeted those campaigning against it. As a result, James has been arrested over 30 times and imprisoned on many occasions. From the beginning James and the Dinka Committee have been closely involved in the work of the CEAWC. Since it was founded, the Dinka Committee has secured the release of over 4,000 people. Throughout this time James has been personally involved in regular visits to the areas where abductees are kept and in negotiating for their release and repatriation with local leaders, government bodies, NGOs and international bodies. He has used his own home in Khartoum as a reception centre for released and escaped children and adults believed to have relatives in the area with whom they could be reunited. Now is a critical time for James and his work. James Aguer, chair of the Dinka Committee


Anti-Slavery - Reporter in brief - features

old.antislavery.org [cached]

James Aguer, Chair of the Dinka Committee in Sudan, was presented with the 2006 Anti-Slavery Award at a ceremony at London's Chatham House in November.
During the 20-year civil war between the Government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army an estimated 14,000 men, women and children were abducted and forced into slavery by government-backed militia. Against this backdrop, James Aguer worked tirelessly in order to locate and secure the release of those enslaved. Portrait of James © Georgina Cranston/Anti-Slavery International James Aguer, 2006 Anti-Slavery Award winner James was presented with the Award by the Earl of Sandwich, Anti-Slavery International trustee and member of the Associate Parliamentary Group for Sudan. Gemma Wolfes interviewed James during his visit to find out what inspired his fight against slavery and about his hopes for the future. James Aguer with Amou Nguong, 85, who was rescued after six years in slavery James Aguer with the 2006 Anti-Slavery award


Anti-Slavery - Reporter in brief - features

old.antislavery.org [cached]

In November, James Aguer, Chairperson of the Dinka Chiefs Committee, visited Anti-Slavery International and told Africa Programme Officer Asim Turkawi about the latest challenges for securing their release and returning them home.
portrait of James Aguer © Anti-Slavery International James Aguer The civil war between the Sudan Government and south's Sudan People's Liberation Movement/Army, which raged until 2003, fuelled the conditions that led to so many men, women and children being forced into slavery. The raids and subsequent abductions across villages in north and western Bahr El Gazal in southern Sudan, were carried out by government-supported militias. "The Arabic-speaking militias, the Murahaleen, had their own agendas; they had the chance to abduct boys whom they used to tend cattle and young girls to be used as sex slaves, wives or given as gifts. As time went on, more and more boys were abducted to be used as labour," James said. Two years on from the cease fire, the fate of these thousands of people remains uncertain. Although there have been returns -- almost 4,000 people have been released and returned since 2004 -- the Dinka Committee estimates 36,000 people are still in slavery and in need of release, return and integration. This number, James says, is far greater than the original estimate of those abducted because it takes into account the children born to those who were forced into slavery who will also have been used as forced labour. "We successfully lobbied the Government to fund its agency, the Committee for the Eradication of Abductions of Women and Children (CEAWC), in order to help the return process," James said. This process should not impede finding, registering and releasing people," James said. "First, systems to achieve this must be in place so that slaves are safe. Prosecution is part of CEAWC's mandate, and we will press for them to happen to ensure justice is carried out; but we have to wait until it is safe," he continued. However many obstacles to releasing, returning and integrating slaves there are, James is optimistic about the future: "Through the new government the large obstacles can be overcome; it is definitely not easy, but it is possible."


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