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This profile was last updated on 1/7/12  and contains information from public web pages.
 
Background

Employment History

  • Director
    National Museum
  • Member, Staff
    National Museum
  • Head
    Irland-Redaktion
  • Head
    Nazi Party
  • Head
    National Museum of Ireland
  • Liberties Press

Board Memberships and Affiliations

  • Director
    Irland-Redaktion
  • Director
    National Museum of Ireland
45 Total References
Web References
Events at the National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology & History - dublin - events
www.dublinks.com, 7 Jan 2012 [cached]
The then Director of the National Museum, archaeologist Adolf Mahr, was Albert Benders main point of contact throughout the donations.
State within a state: the Nazis in neutral Ireland / Features / Issue 6 (Nov/Dec 2006) / Volume 14 / historyireland.com
www.historyireland.com [cached]
Other Nazi Party members include (standing, left to right) Adolf Mahr, Otto Bene (head of the Nazi Party in London) and Oswald Mueller-Dubrow (a director of Siemans engineering company).
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Adolf Mahr
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Dr Adolf Mahr ...
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Dr Adolf Mahr on his appointment as director of the National Museum, Dublin, 1934. (National Museum of Ireland) Brase's successor was another Irish state employee, Dr Adolf Mahr, an Austrian archaeologist who had arrived in Dublin in 1927 to join the staff of the National Museum in Kildare Street (he was promoted to the top post of museum director in 1934 by Éamon de Valera's cabinet). Mahr scoured the country buying artefacts for the museum but, like other party members, he had a hidden agenda. After taking over as party leader in Ireland, Mahr set about building up the NSDAP's membership and was quite successful; at least 23 Germans were recruited to the party during Mahr's 1934-9 term (roughly a quarter of all adult German males in the 26 counties). Mahr's efforts on behalf of the Nazi Party were not restricted to German citizens. According to Irish military intelligence files, he 'made many efforts to convert Irish graduates and other persons with whom he had associations, to Nazi doctrines and beliefs'. Adolf Mahr was no 'Mr Nice Guy', and his recruitment methods have been described by Lt. Col. John P. Duggan (retd), a leading expert on Irish-German relations in the 1933-45 period, as 'bully boy tactics'. Those targeted by Mahr appear to have been given the choice of joining the party or being packed off to the Fatherland in disgrace. Visiting Germans had to report first to Mahr or face a reprimand. Using his virtually unlimited powers within the small German colony, Mahr was able to get two diplomats (Georg von Dehn-Schmidt, in 1934, and Erich Schroetter, in 1937) sent home to Berlin for not toeing the party line.
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From 1934 to 1939 Mahr was, de facto, Germany's top diplomatic representative in pre-war Ireland. Dr Mahr even represented the Irish branch of the Nazi Party at the May 1937 coronation of George VI in London, where he was joined by Ribbentrop, then Hitler's ambassador to the Court of St James. It was no coincidence, therefore, that Mahr secured a post as head of the Irish desk at the wartime foreign office in Berlin when Ribbentrop was foreign minister. Mahr also directed radio propaganda broadcasts to Ireland from 1941 to 1945. In the later stages of the war, his radio responsibilities were extended to include large parts of the English-speaking world. A major biography of Adolf Mahr by journalist Gerry Mullins (due to be published in 2007) will cast the Austrian in a more sinister light than hitherto seen, linking him to the Nazis' core anti-Semitic plans, particularly in the propaganda sphere.
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One of the museum director's colleagues, a Scottish archaeologist, Dr Howard Kilbride-Jones, recalled that in June 1938, when Mahr needed additional funding to complete an archaeo-logical dig in Drimnagh, they called to the taoiseach's office and left with de Valera's personal cheque for £400 (about ?25,000 in today's values).
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Annual Nazi Party rally in Nuremburg, 6 September 1938-Mahr left Dublin in July 1939 with the intention of attending the 1939 one, cancelled owing to the outbreak of war. (TimePix/Hugo Jaeger) Nazi Party members like Adolf Mahr found themselves in an awkward position as state employees in the 1930s because, essentially, they could not serve two masters without a conflict of interest arising.
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Adolf Mahr was assisted in his Nazi Party duties by a Dublin-based Siemens director, Oswald Mueller-Dubrow, who operated as Mahr's deputy in the Nazi Party's ausland (foreign) organisation, which kept an eye on Germans living abroad, enforced discipline among party members and produced regular reports for Berlin.
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According to Irish military intelligence records, Adolf Mahr and Otto Reinhard were both employed during the war in 'one of the German intelligence sections which dealt with matters concerning a landing in Ireland'.
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In July 1939 Mahr had received a letter from an SS war maps office in Prague thanking him for his 'efforts'. But, in the 1930s, were de Valera and his ministers aware that Nazi Party members were on the state payroll?
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Adolf Mahr had left Dublin two months earlier, officially for his annual holidays in Austria in July and to attend the sixth international congress of archaeology in Berlin in August. Unofficially, however, he had planned to attend the Nazi Party's annual rally at Nuremburg in September (cancelled on the outbreak of war). In addition, since early 1939 he had been feeling the pressure from top Irish officials over his Nazi Party role, and had been shadowed both by the Garda special branch and the army's military intelligence arm, G2.
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'I suggested to him, as I have frequently done to his minister [Hempel] and his minister's predecessor [Schroetter] that the existence of a Nazi organisation in Dublin . . . having as its chief member and organiser an employee of our state [Mahr] was not calculated to improve relations between our two governments.'
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Dr Eduard Hempel, Dr Vogelsang and Dr Adolf Mahr at the German legation's garden party in Dublin, 1938....
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Dr Eduard Hempel, Dr Vogelsang and Dr Adolf Mahr at the German legation's garden party in Dublin, 1938.
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On his release from a British army internment camp in Germany in April 1946, Adolf Mahr sought reinstatement as director of the National Museum (technically he was on leave of absence from his job in Dublin).
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Mahr was pensioned off against his wishes and never set foot on Irish soil again.
‘Dublin Nazi No 1′ ran Hitler Youth from National Museum | Alison O Riordan
alisonoriordan.com [cached]
Bender, who lived in America, significantly added to the collections of the National Museum, where Mahr was the first Keeper of Irish Antiquities and later Director.
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However, Mahr seemed to have little difficulty with individual Jews. Jewish children played in the Mahr home and Mahr exchanged letters throughout the Thirties with philanthropist Albert Bender in San Francisco.
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When the Nazis invaded Austria, Mahr wrote to Bender several times to see if Bender could help one of Mahr's Jewish friends get out of Austria and to safety in the US.
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Eventually I was put on the phone to a man who told me that Mahr had been director, that he had been considered a spy, that he was a Nazi and that he escaped from Ireland to Germany just before war broke out.
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It is startling today to see groups of young Irish and German boys and girls lined up in military format with a Swastika above their heads, arms outstretched in a Nazi salute, with Adolf Mahr at their head.
Mahr, who made an important contribution to Ireland's cultural life, left Ireland for Germany with his family in August 1939 to attend a seminar but got stranded there when the war began and was never to return to Ireland. During the war, Mahr became head of Irland-Redaktion, the Nazi regime's propaganda radio service, which broadcast into neutral Ireland.
After Germany's surrender, Mahr was arrested and spent time in a British prisoner-of-war camp. On his release, he tried to return to Ireland - but despite a well-mounted campaign by friends and personal begging letters to Eamon de Valera (which were ignored) he remained in Germany where he died in 1951, aged 64. To this day, he is considered in some circles to have been a spy who used his position at the National Museum to help prepare Germany's invasion plan of Ireland.
In the Thirties, Ireland - like most of Europe - was politically confused, with the Irish branch of the Nazi party being completely above board. Accounts of the group's Christmas parties were carried in national newspapers - and Irish Times editor RM Smylie even attended some of the Nazi parties.
'Dublin Nazi No 1: The Life of Adolf Mahr' by Gerry Mullins is available in all good bookshops nationwide
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Advert, Antiquities, Bender, Beneficiary, De Valera, Gustav, Hitler Youth, International Jewry, Irish Archaeology, Jewish Children, Jewish Friends, Leeson Street, Mahr, National Museum Of Ireland, Nazi Party, Nazi Youth, Philanthropist, Riordan, Thirties, Time Director
Dublin Nazi No. 1, Gerry Mullins, Liberties Press
www.libertiespress.com, 27 Aug 2008 [cached]
Dublin Nazi No.1 - The life of Adolf Mahr
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Dublin Nazi No.1 is a revealing biography by Gerry Mullins of the extraordinary life of Dr Adolf Mahr, who was head of the National Museum of Ireland and also the head of the Nazi Party in Ireland.
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In the 1930s, Dr Adolf Mahr was head of the National Museum of Ireland, where he earned the title the father of Irish archaeology. He was also the head of the Nazi Party in Ireland, and was dubbed Dublin Nazi No. 1. Under pressure from Irish and British military intelligence, he left for Germany shortly before the outbreak of war in 1939, never to return. To this day, he is considered in some circles to have been a spy who used his position at the museum to help prepare Germany's invasion plan of Ireland.
During the war, he became director of Irland-Redaktion, the German propaganda radio service that broadcast into neutral Ireland. He was later arrested and tortured by the British, and upon his release tried to return to Ireland, but to no avail. He remains one of the most controversial figures in twentieth-century Irish history.
World Affairs - Liberties Press
www.libertiespress.com, 1 Sept 2012 [cached]
Dublin Nazi No.1 - The life of Adolf Mahr Dublin Nazi No.1 is a revealing biography of the extraordinary life of Dr Adolf Mahr, who was head of the National Museum of Ireland and also the head of the Nazi Party in Ireland.
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This newly formatted edition of Dublin Nazi No.1: The Life of Adolf Mahr is the best-selling biography of the former director of the National Museum of Ireland and self-described 'Dublin Nazi No.1'.
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