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This profile was last updated on 11/5/15  and contains information from public web pages.

Sir Tafawa Balewa

Wrong Sir Tafawa Balewa?

Minister

Phone: (308) ***-****  HQ Phone
Local Address:  Lagos , Nigeria
House of Representatives
2447 Rayburn House Office Bldg
Washington D.C. , District of Columbia 20515
United States

Company Description: The House of Mexico is one of the next international cottages to be built in Balboa Park. The specific purposes of the House of Mexico are to provide patriotic,...   more
Background

Employment History

  • President
    Nigeria
  • Minister of Works
    Nigeria
  • Prime Minister
    Nigeria
  • Prime Minister

Board Memberships and Affiliations

Education

  • Bauchi Provincial School
  • Katsina Teacher Training College
200 Total References
Web References
Founding Fathers | La Commission du Bassin du Lac Tchad
www.cblt.org, 5 Nov 2015 [cached]
Alhaji Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa was born in Tafawa Balewa, North East State, Nigeria. After attending Katsina Teacher Training College (1928-1933), he was a teacher and later headmaster of the Bauchi Middle School. He studied at the London University Institute of Education (1945-1946), where he received a teacher's certificate in history. In 1943 he founded the Bauchi Discussion Circle, an organization interested in political reform. In 1948 he was elected vice president of the Northern Teacher's Association, the first trade union in Northern Nigeria. In 1949 he helped organize the Northern People's Congress (NPC), originally conceived as a cultural organization but by 1951 a political party.
In 1951, in the North's first elections, Tafawa Balewa won seats in the Northern House of Assembly and in the House of Representatives in Lagos, where he became a minister in the Central Council. In 1952 he became Nigerian minister of works and in 1954 minister of transport and the senior minister and leader of the NPC in the House of Representatives. In 1957 he became the first prime minister of Nigeria, He retained the post as Prime Minister when Nigeria gained independence in 1960, and was reelected in 1964. As prime minister, Tafawa Balewa developed a favorable reputation in international circles. He was an important leader in the formation of the Organization of African Unity and creating a cooperative relationship with French speaking African Countries. On 22nd of May, 1964 in Fort Lamy (today N'Djamena), along with the leaders of the three other Lake Chad riparian countries, he signed the Convention establishing the Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC). Tafawa Balewa died in January 1966 following army a military coup.
Permanent Representative's Remarks on 65th GA
www.nigeriaunmission.org, 23 June 2012 [cached]
Although Prime Minister Tafawa Balewa had the distinct honour of taking the world stage following the admission of Nigeria as member of the United Nations on October 7, 1960; it is President Jonathan's unparalleled honour to take the stage as Nigeria marks its milestone "Double-Golden Jubilee" anniversary of national independence and a major Troop Contributing Country (TCC) in international peacekeeping. He will be the first President of Nigeria to personally lead Nigeria's delegation in the UN Security Council Summit.
Biography of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa - ChatAfrik
chatafrik.com [cached]
Abubakar Tafawa Balewa was born in Tafawa Balewa, North East State, Nigeria.
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In 1946 Tafawa Balewa had been selected by the Bauchi Native Authority as their representative to the Northern House of Assembly, and the House of Assembly in turn selected him to become a member of the Nigerian Legislative Council. In 1951, in the North's first elections, Tafawa Balewa won seats in the Northern House of Assembly and in the House of Representatives in Lagos, where he became a minister in the Central Council. In 1952 he became Nigerian minister of works and in 1954 minister of transport and the senior minister and leader of the NPC in the House of Representatives. In 1957 he became the first prime minister of Nigeria, a position he held until his death.
As prime minister, Tafawa Balewa developed a favorable reputation in international circles. He was considered a pro-Western leader but was very critical of South African racial policies and of French plans to test atomic devices in the Sahara. His last public act was to convene a Commonwealth Conference in Lagos to discuss action against the white supremacist unilateral declaration of independence by Rhodesia.
Throughout his career Tafawa Balewa played a leading role in national policy making. In 1950 in the Northern House of Assembly he had advocated fundamental reforms to the system of Native Authorities in the North, a proposal highly unpopular among many of the Northern leaders. Throughout the 1950s he participated with great skill in the discussions on constitutional reform which ultimately led to independence. Nevertheless, Tafawa Balewa often seemed limited in his own personal power, because as vice president of the NPC he was answerable theoretically to Sir Ahmadu Bello, premier of the Northern Region and president of the NPC. Some observers have concluded that this relationship with Bello hindered Tafawa Balewa in handling the major crises which arose in the first years of Nigeria's independence.
...
It was one of these crises, the Western Region elections of 1965, which led to chaos in the Western Region and was the immediate cause of the downfall of Tafawa Balewa's government. In January 1966 a discontented segment of the army attempted a coup d'etat in which Tafawa Balewa was kidnaped and murdered.
Biography of Tafawa ...
www.chatafrik.com, 1 May 2012 [cached]
Biography of Tafawa Balewa
...
Biography of Tafawa Balewa
Alhaji Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa (1912-1966) was the first prime minister of independent Nigeria, serving from 1957 to 1966.
Abubakar Tafawa Balewa was born in Tafawa Balewa, North East State, Nigeria.
...
In 1946 Tafawa Balewa had been selected by the Bauchi Native Authority as their representative to the Northern House of Assembly, and the House of Assembly in turn selected him to become a member of the Nigerian Legislative Council. In 1951, in the North's first elections, Tafawa Balewa won seats in the Northern House of Assembly and in the House of Representatives in Lagos, where he became a minister in the Central Council. In 1952 he became Nigerian minister of works and in 1954 minister of transport and the senior minister and leader of the NPC in the House of Representatives. In 1957 he became the first prime minister of Nigeria, a position he held until his death.
As prime minister, Tafawa Balewa developed a favorable reputation in international circles. He was considered a pro-Western leader but was very critical of South African racial policies and of French plans to test atomic devices in the Sahara. His last public act was to convene a Commonwealth Conference in Lagos to discuss action against the white supremacist unilateral declaration of independence by Rhodesia.
Throughout his career Tafawa Balewa played a leading role in national policy making. In 1950 in the Northern House of Assembly he had advocated fundamental reforms to the system of Native Authorities in the North, a proposal highly unpopular among many of the Northern leaders. Throughout the 1950s he participated with great skill in the discussions on constitutional reform which ultimately led to independence. Nevertheless, Tafawa Balewa often seemed limited in his own personal power, because as vice president of the NPC he was answerable theoretically to Sir Ahmadu Bello, premier of the Northern Region and president of the NPC. Some observers have concluded that this relationship with Bello hindered Tafawa Balewa in handling the major crises which arose in the first years of Nigeria's independence.
...
It was one of these crises, the Western Region elections of 1965, which led to chaos in the Western Region and was the immediate cause of the downfall of Tafawa Balewa's government. In January 1966 a discontented segment of the army attempted a coup d'etat in which Tafawa Balewa was kidnaped and murdered.
Tafawa Balewa had very humble ...
www.zodml.org, 21 Dec 2013 [cached]
Tafawa Balewa had very humble origins. He was born on October 1, 1912 in the village of Tafawa Balewa, in modern-day Bauchi State.
...
Tafawa Balewa was his father's only child. Although it is widely presumed that he was Hausa, Balewa's father was in fact of Bageri ethnicity, and his mother Fatima Inna was Fulani. He attended Koranic school and learnt the first chapter of the Qur'an by heart. For his Western education he attended Bauchi Provincial School. According to his teacher and classmates he was shy, quiet and not an outstanding student. He later enrolled at Katsina Teacher Training College (1928-1933) and graduated with a third class certificate, performing best in English. He became a teacher and having passed the Senior Teacher's Certificate examination he would go on to become headmaster of the Bauchi Middle School. He and a handful of northern teachers obtained scholarships to study at the University of London's Institute of Education from 1945 to 1946, where he received a teacher's certificate in history. When he returned to Nigeria, Balewa said he "returned to Nigeria with new eyes, because [he] had seen people who lived without fear, who obeyed the law as part of their nature, who knew individual liberty.
...
In 1946 the Bauchi Native Authority had selected Tafawa Balewa as their representative to the Northern House of Assembly and the House of Assembly in turn selected him to become a member of the Nigerian Legislative Council. In the North's first elections in 1951, Tafawa Balewa won seats in the Northern House of Assembly and in the House of Representatives in Lagos, where he became a minister in the Central Council. By 1952 he became Minister of Works and in 1954 was made Minister of Transport and the Senior Minister and leader of the NPC in the House of Representatives. In 1957 he became the first prime minister of Nigeria, a position he held until his death. At first, Balewa was suspicious of Nigerian unification and feared that the Northern Region would be dominated by the better educated and dynamic South. He said that "the southern tribes who are now pouring into the north in ever increasing numbers...do not mix with the northern people in social matters and we...look upon them as invaders. Since 1914 the British government has been trying to make Nigeria into one country, but the Nigerian people themselves are historically different in their backgrounds, in their religious beliefs and customs, and do not show themselves any sign of willingness to unite. So what it comes to is that Nigerian unity is only a British intention in the country." He would later change his ideology and adopt a federal outlook following a visit to America in 1955. He reminisced that "in less than 200 years, this great country [America] was welded together by people of so many different backgrounds.
...
Tafawa Balewa, Princess Alexandra, Nigerian independence
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Princess Alexandra and Tafawa Balewa
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In 1957 Balewa was elected Chief Minister, forming a coalition government between the NPC and the NCNC (National Council of Nigeria and the Cameroons - later the National Council of Nigerian Citizens), led by Nnamdi Azikiwe.
...
As prime minister, Tafawa Balewa developed a favourable reputation in international circles. He was considered a pro-Western leader but was very critical of South African racial policies and of French plans to test atomic devices in the Sahara. His last public act was to convene a Commonwealth Conference in Lagos to discuss action against the unilateral declaration of independence by Rhodesia. Throughout his career Tafawa Balewa played a leading role in national policy making. In 1950 in the Northern House of Assembly he had advocated fundamental reforms to the system of Native Authorities in the North, a proposal highly unpopular among many of the Northern leaders. Throughout the 1950s he participated with great skill in the discussions on constitutional reform that ultimately led to independence. He played important roles in the continent's formative indigenous rule and was an important leader in the formation of the Organization of African Unity and the creation of a cooperative relationship with French-speaking African countries. He was also instrumental in negotiations between Moise Tshombe and the Congolese authorities during the Congo Crisis of 1960-1964, led a vocal protest against the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960 and also entered into an alliance with Commonwealth Ministers who wanted South Africa to leave the Commonwealth in 1961. As Prime Minister of Nigeria, Tafawa Balewa, from 1960 to 1961, doubled as the country's foreign affairs advocate.
...
Balewa proposed an amendment to Nigeria's constitution to give due recognition to the nation-building role played by then Governor-General Nnamdi Azikiwe. Balewa proposed that "Nnamdi Azikiwe shall be deemed to have been elected President and Commander in-Chief of the Armed Forces" because "Nigeria can never adequately reward Dr Azikiwe" for the nationalist role he played in building Nigeria and achieving independence.
...
On January 15, 1966 armed soldiers who were executing Nigeria's first military coup kidnapped Tafawa Balewa from his official residence. He was missing for several days and a search for him was ordered by the new military regime headed by Major-General Aguiyi-Ironsi. His family and friends continued to believe he was alive. Rumours claimed the rebel soldiers were holding him alive and that he would be released as part of a prisoner swap involving the imprisoned Obafemi Awolowo. However, these hopes were dashed when his decomposing corpse was found a few days later, dumped in a roadside bush. His corpse was taken to Ikeja Airport in the company of Police Commissioner Hamman Maiduguri, Inspector-General of Police Kam Selem, Maitama Sule, and his wives Laraba and Jummai, who also accompanied it as it was flown to Bauchi where he was buried. His body now lies inside a tomb which has since been declared a national monument. The tomb includes a library and a mosque. The famous race course square in Lagos was renamed "Tafawa Balewa Square" in his memory. His image appears on the N5 note. The Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University in Bauchi is named in his honour.
Watch: Tafawa Balewa in an interview with the BBC a few days after Nigeria's independence
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